– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter A:  Ac ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

Ac

 

Aa . Ab . Ad . Af . Ag . Ah . Ai . Aj . Ak . Al . Am . An . Ap . Aq . Ar . As . At . Au . Av . Aw

 

Academic
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ-kuh-DEH-mi[k]//æ.kə(ʌ).ˈdɛ.mə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Academy
– For this word, the “A” turns into the u-schwa, the “c” is hard, the second “a” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “e” turns into the true-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/uh-KæD-ə-mee//ə(ʌ).ˈkæ.ɾə.miː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Acceleration
– For this word, the “A” turns into an i-schwa, the first “c” is soft, the second “c” is soft, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-seh-l’r-AY-shihn//ə(ɪ)k.ˌsɛ.lɚ.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Accent
– For this word, the “A” is short, for the “cc” combination – the first “c” is hard, the second “c” is soft (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æK-sehn[t]//ˈæk.sɛn[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Accentuate
.– For this word, the “A” turns into an i-schwa, the first “c” is hard, the second”c” is soft, the first “e” is short, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, there is a phantom-w in-between the “u” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SEHN-choo-ay[t]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsɛn.tʃu.we[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Accentuated
– For this word, the “A” turns into an i-schwa, the first “c” is hard, the second “c” is soft, the “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, there is a phantom “w” in-between the “u” and the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns in an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihk-SEHN-choo-ay-dih[d]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsɛn.tʃu.we.ɾə(ɪ)ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Accept
– For this word, the “A” turns into the true-schwa, for the “cc” combination – the first “c” is hard, the second “c” is soft (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the “p” is (almost) stopped, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ək-SEH[P][T]//əkˈsɛ[p][t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Acceptable
.– For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, for the “cc” combination – the first “c” is hard, the second “c” is soft (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to another), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ək-SEH[P]-duh-bəl//ək.ˈsɛ[p].də(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Accepted
– For this word, the “A” turns into an true-schwa, for the “cc” combination – the first “c” is hard, the second “c” is soft (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ək-SEH[P]-dih[d]//ək.ˈsɛ[p].də(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Access
– For this word, the “A” is short,for the “cc” combination – the first “c” is hard, the second “c” is soft (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æK-sehs//ˈæk.sɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Accessibility
.– For this word, the “A” is short,for the “cc” combination – the first “c” is hard, the second “c” is soft (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, the third “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/æk-seh-sih-BIH-lih-dee//ˌæk.sɛs.sə(ɪ).ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Accessible
.– For this word, the “A” turns into an i-schwa, for the “cc” combination – the first “c” is hard, the second “c” is soft (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ible” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihK-SEH-sih-bəl//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsɛ.sə(ɪ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Accessories
– For this word, the “A” turns into an i-schwa, for the “cc” combination – the first “c” is hard, the second “c” is soft (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “o” disappears, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost, like the letter “s”

/ihk-SEH-s’r-eez//ə(ɪ)kˈsɛ.sɚ.iːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Accident
– For this word, the “A” is short, for the “cc” combination – the first “c” is hard, the second “c” is soft (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “e” is short, and the “t” is (often) stopped

/æK-sih-dehn-[t]//ˈæk.sə(ɪ).ˈdɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Accidental
– For this word, the “A” is short, for the “cc” combination – the first “c” is hard, the second “c” is soft (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “e” is short, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æk-sih-DEHN-təl//æk.sə(ɪ).ˈdɛn.təl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Accidentally
– For this word, the “A” is short, for the “cc” combination – the first “c” is hard, the second “c” is soft (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “e” is short, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æk-sih-DEHN[T]-ʔlee//æk.sə(ɪ).ˈdɛn.[t].ʔliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Acclimated
– For this word the “A” is short, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is an i-schwa, , for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped but with the addition of the “-ed” ending – the “t” is a flap-t, and the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” (even if it’s stopped) – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/æK-lih-may-dih[d]//ˈæk.lə(ɪ).meiː.ɾ(ɪ)[ɾ]/– Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Accommodated
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “o” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t”, the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uh-KAH-muh-day-dihd//ə(ʌ).ˈkɑ.mə(ʌ).deiː.ɾə(ɪ)ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Accommodation
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “o” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” turns into an i-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-kah-mih-DAY-shihn//ə(ʌ).ˌkɑ.mə(ɪ).ˈdeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Accommodations
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “o” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” turns into an i-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/uh-kah-mih-DAY-shihn//ə(ʌ).ˌkɑ.mə(ɪ).ˈdeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Accompany
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/uh-KUHM-pih-nee//ə(ʌ).ˈkʌm.pə(ɪ).niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Accomplice
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is short, and for the “-ice” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final
“e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-KAHM-plihs//ə(ʌ).ˈkɑm.plə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Accomplish
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is short, for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-KAHM-plihsh//ə(ʌ).ˈkɑm.plə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Accomplished
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is short, for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-
voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the “sh” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/uh-KAHM-plihsh-t//ə(ʌ).ˈkɑm.plə(ɪ)ʃ.t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Accomplishments
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is short, for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-
voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/uh-KAHM-plihsh-mihn-ts//ə(ʌ).ˈkɑm.plə(ɪ)sh.mə(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable, and that the “ts” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

According
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-KOHR-ding//ə(ʌ).ˈkoɹ.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Account
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/uh-KOWN-[t]//ə(ʌ).ˈkaun.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Accountability
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ou” combination is pronounced like an “ow” combination, and for the “-ability” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-cown-tuh-BIH-lih-dee//ə(ʌ).ˌkaun.tə(ʌ).ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/– Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable, that the major stress is on the fourth syllable, and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Accountant
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ou” combination is pronounced like an “ow” combination, the first “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-KOWN[T]-ihn-[t]//ə(ʌ).ˈkaun[t].ə(ɪ)n.[t]/– Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Accounting
– For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “‘ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə-KOWN-ting//ə.ˈkɑun.tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Accounts
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ou” combination is pronounced like an “ow” combination

/uh-KOWN-ts//ə(ʌ).ˈkaun.ts/– Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Accuracy
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “a” is turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-acy” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æK-you-rih-see//ˈæk.juɹ.ə(ɪ).siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Accurate
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æK-y’r-ih[t]//ˈæk.jɚ.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Accurately
– For this word, “A” is short, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ately” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, the “e” is silent, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ-kyou-rih[t]-lee//ˈæ.kju.rə(ɪ)[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Accuse
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/uh-KYOOZ//ə(ʌ).ˈkjuz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Accustomed
– For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the letter “m” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/ə-KUHS-tuhm-d//ə.ˈkʌs.tə(ʌ)m.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Ache
– For this word, the “A” is a True Long “A”, the “ch” combination is pronounced like the single hard letter “c”, and the final “e” is silent

/ay-k//e.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Achieve
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/uh-CHEEV//ə(ʌ).ˈtʃiːv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Achieved
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “v”– the “e” of te “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

/uh-CHEEV-[d]//ə(ʌ).ˈtʃiːv.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Achievement
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is silent, and for the “ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/uh-CHEEV-mihn-[t]//ə(ʌ).ˈtʃiːv.mə(ʌ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Achievements
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is silent, and for the “ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-CHEEV-mihn-ts//ə(ʌ).ˈtʃiːv.mə(ʌ)n.ts/ – Notice also that that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Achieving
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-CHEEV-ing//ə(ʌ).ˈtʃiːv.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Aching
– For this word, the “A” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ay-king//ˈeiː.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Acid
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/æ-sih[d]//ˈæ.sə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Acknowledge
– For this word, the “A” turns into an i-schwa, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” but is (often) stopped, the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “o”, the “e” turns into the i-schwa, the “dg” combination is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/ih[g]-NAH-lihdʒ//ə(ɪ)[g].ˈnɑ.lə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Acquaintance
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is silent, the “qu” is pronounced like a “kw” combination, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” becomes a glottal stop, for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-KWAYN-ihn-s//ə(ʌ).ˈkweiːn.ʔə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Acquaintances
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is silent, the “qu” is pronounced like a “kw” combination, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” becomes a glottal stop, for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/uh-KWAYN-‘ihn-sihz//ə(ʌ).ˈkweiːn.ʔə(ɪ)n.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Acquainted
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is silent, the “qu” is pronounced like a “kw” combination, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uh-KWAYN-tih[d]//ə(ʌ).ˈkweiːn.tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Acquire
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is silent, the “qu” combination is pronounced like a “kw” combination, and for the “-ire” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-KWIGH-y’r//ə(ʌ).ˈkwʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Acquired
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is silent, the “qu” combination is pronounced like a “kw” combination, and for the “-ire” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-KWIGH-y’r-[d]//ə(ʌ).ˈkwʌiː.jɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Acquiring
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is silent, the “qu” combination is pronounced like a “kw” combination,, and for the “-ire” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-KWIGH-yr-ing//ə(ʌ).ˈkwʌiː.jɚŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Acquisition
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is silent, the “qu” combination sounds like a “kw” combination, the first “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ-kwih-ZIH-shihn//æ.kwə(ɪ).ˈzɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Acquisitions
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is silent, the “qu” combination is pronounced like a “kw” combination, the first “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “i” is short, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/æ-kwih-ZIH-shihn-z//æ.kwə(ɪ).ˈzɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Acronym
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into the u-schwa, and the “y” turns into an i-schwa

/æK-ruh-nihm//ˈæk.ɹə(ʌ).nə(ɪ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Acronyms
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into the u-schwa, the “y” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/æK-ruh-nihm-z//ˈæk.ɹə(ʌ).nə(ɪ)m.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Across
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/uh-KRAWS//ə(ʌ).ˈkɹɔs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Act
– For this word, the “A” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped

/æ[k]t//æ[k]t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Action
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æK-shihn//ˈæk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Actions
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/æK-shihn-z//ˈæk.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Activate
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æK-dih-vay[t]//ˈæk.də(ɪ).ve[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Active
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æK-dihv//ˈæk.də(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Actively
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard, the “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/æK-dihv-lee//ˈæk.də(ɪ)v.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Activists
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard, the first “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æK-dih-vihs-ts//ˈæk.də(ɪ).və(ɪ)s.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Activities
– For this word, the “A” should be short, the “c” is hard, the first “i” is short, the second “i” turns into an i-schwa, the second “t” (usually) turns into the flap-d, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/æk-TIH-vih-deez//æk.ˈtɪ.və(ɪ).ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Activity
– For this word, the “A” should be short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æk-TIH-vih-dee//æk.ˈtɪ.və(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Actor
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ[K]-d’r//ˈæ[k].dɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Actors
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/æ[K]-d’r-z//ˈæ[k].dɚ.z/ – Notice also the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z’ ending acts as a third syllable

 

Actress
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ[K]-chrihs//ˈæ[k].tʃɹə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Actresses
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “e” of the “-es” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/æ[K]-chrihs-ihz//ˈæ[k].tʃɹə(ɪ).sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Actual
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æK-choo-əl//ˈæk.tʃu.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Actually
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped,the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æK-chuh-lee//ˈæk.tʃə(ʌ).liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Actuary
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æK-choo-ayr-ee//ˈæk.tʃu.eɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter A ) –


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