– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter A:  Ar ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

Ar

 

Aa . Ab . Ac . Ad . Af . Ag . Ah . Ai . Aj . Ak . Al . Am . An . Ap . Aq . As . At . Au . Av . Aw

 

Arab
– For this word, the “A” is long, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “b” is (often) stopped

/AYR-uh[b]//ˈeɪɹ.ə(ʌ)[b]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Arbitration
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ahr-bih-CHRAY-shihn//ɑɹ.bə(ɪ).ˈtʃɹeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Archer
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AHR-ch’r//ˈɑɹ.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Architect
– For this word, the “A” sounds like the short letter “o”, the “ch” combination sounds like the letter “k”, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/AHR-kih-tehk-[t]//ˈɑr.kə(ʌ).tɛk.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

 

Architecture
– For this word, the “A” sounds like the short letter “o”, the “ch” combination sounds like the letter “k”, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AHR-kih-tehk-ch’r//ˈɑr.kə(ʌ).tɛk.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Are
– This word is pronounced exactly like the name for the name of the letter “R”

/ahr//ɑr/

 

Area
– For this word, the “A” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” is long, and the final “a” is pronounced like the short letter “u”

/AYR-ee-uh//ˈeɪɹ.iː.ʌ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Arena
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is long, and the final “a” is pronounced like the short letter “u”

/uh-REE-nuh//ə(ʌ).ˈɹiː.nʌ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Aren’t
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the “e” disappears, and the “‘t” is (often) stopped

/ahrn-[t]//ɑɹn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Argentina
.– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/ahr-dʒehn-TEE-nuh//ɑɹ.dʒɛn.ˈtiː.nə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Argentinian
.– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ian” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ahr-dʒə(ɪ)n-TIH-nee-yihn//ɑɹ.dʒə(ɪ)n.ˈtɪ.niː.jə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Arguably
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ably” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AHR-gyoo-uh-blee//ˈɑɹ.gju.ə(ʌ).bliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Argue
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is hard, and the “ue” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”

/AHR-gyoo//ˈɑɹ.gju/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Argued
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “g” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/AHR-gyoo[d]//ˈɑɹ.gju[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Argues
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is hard, the “ue” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/AHR-gyouz//ˈɑɹ.gjuz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Arguing
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AHR-gyoo-ing//ˈɑɹ.gju.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Argument
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AHR-gyoo-mihn-[t]//ˈɑɹ.gju.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

 

Arise
– For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/ə-RAIZ//ə.ˈɹaiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Arithmetic
– For this word, the “A” is an u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the “th combination is un-voiced, the “e” is a true-schwa, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/uh-RIHTH-mə-tih[k]//ə(ʌ).ˈɹɪθ.mə.tə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Arkansas
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the third “a” is pronounced like an “aw” combination, and the final “s” is silent

/AHR-kihn-saw//ˈɑɹ.kə(ɪ)n.sɔ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Arm
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”,

/ahr-m//ɑɹ.m/ – Notice also that the “m” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Armadillo
– For this word, the “A” is short, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the letter “o” is long

/ahr-muh-DIH-loh//ɑɹ.mə(ʌ)ˈdɪ.lo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Armed
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “m” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/ahrm-d//ɑɹm.d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Arms
.– For this word,the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ahrm-z//ɑɹm.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Army
.– For this word,the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/AHR-mee//ˈɑɹ.miː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Around
.– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/uh-ROWN-[d]//ə(ʌ)ˈɹaun.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Arrange
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/uh-RAYN-dʒ//ə(ʌ).ˈreiːn.dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and the the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Arranged
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the soft letter “g” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced almost like the letter “t” (this is due to the soft “g” sound directly before it)

/uh-RAYN-dʒ-t//ə(ʌ).ˈreiːn.dʒ.t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and the the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Arrangement
.– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, the first “e” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-RAYN-dʒ-mihn-[t]//ə(ʌ)ˈɹeiːn.dʒ.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

 

Arranging
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-RAYN-dʒing//ə(ʌ).ˈreiːn.dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Arrest
.– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/uh-REHS-[t]//ə(ʌ)ˈɹɛs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Arrested
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uh-REHS-dih[d]//ə(ʌ).ˈɹɛs.də(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Arrival
.– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-RAI-vəl//ə(ʌ)ˈɹaiː.vəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Arrivals
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/uh-RAI-vəl-z//ə(ʌ)ˈɹaiː.vəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Arrive
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, and the “e” is silent

/uh-RAIV//ə(ʌ).ˈɹaiːv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Arrived
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “v” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/uh-RAIV-[d]//ə(ʌ).ˈɹaiːv.[d]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Arrogant
– For this word, the “A” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AYR-uh-gihn-[t]//ˈeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).gə(ɪ)n.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Arrow
.– For this word, the “A” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” is long, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (the letter “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”)

/AYR-oh//ˈeɪɹ.o/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Art
.– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ahr-[t]//ɑɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Article
.– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “c” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent

/AHR-dih-kəl//ˈɑɹ.ɾə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Articles
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “c” and the “l”, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/AHR-dih-kəl-z//ˈɑɹ.ɾə(ɪ).kəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Artificial
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is a flap-t, the first “i” turns into an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the “-cial” suffix – the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ahr-dih-FIH-shəl//ɑɹ.ɾə(ɪ).ˈfɪ.ʃəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Artist
.– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the first “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AHR-dihs-[t]//ˈɑɹ.ɾə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Artistic
.– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ahr-TIHS-dihk/ /ɑɹˈtə(ɪ)s.ɾə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Artists
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often)
stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AHR-dihs-ts//ˈɑɹ.ɾə(ɪ)s.ts/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter A ) –


Jump To…

Aa . Bb . Cc . Dd . Ee . Ff . Gg . Hh . Ii . Jj . Kk . Ll . Mm . Nn . Oo . Pp . Qq . Rr . Ss . Tt . Uu . Vv . Ww . Xx . Yy . Zz
Numbers

 


 

Explore GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!

Leave a Reply

Yo!