– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter A:  As ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

As

 

Aa . Ab . Ac . Ad . Af . Ag . Ah . Ai . Aj . Ak . Al . Am . An . Ap . Aq . Ar . At . Au . Av . Aw

 

As
 – For this word, the “A” is short, and the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

– /æz/ /æz/ –

 

ASA
 – For this acronym (as with any acronym that does not spell a discernible word) we say the names for each individual letter

– /ay-ehs-ay/ – /eiː-ɛs-eiː/ – 

 

Ashes
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/æ-shiz//ˈæ.ʃə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Ashamed
.– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and since the root-word ends with the letter “m” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/uh-SHAYM-[d]//ə(ʌ)ˈʃeiːm.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Asia
 – For this word, the “A” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “si” is pronounced as the voiced “sh” combination, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

– /AY-zhuh/ – /ˈeiː.ʒə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress in on the first syllable

 

Asian
 – For this word, the “A” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the second “a” turns into an i-schwa

– /AY-zhihn/ – /ˈeiː.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Aside
.– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is long, the “d” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/uh-SAI-[d]//ə(ʌ)ˈsaiː.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Ask
 – For this word, the “A” is short, and the “k” is (often) stopped

/æs-[k]//æs.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Asks
 – For this word, the “A” is short

/æs-ks//æs.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Asked
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “k” is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/æs-[k]-t/ – /ˈæs-[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable –

 

Asleep (a’Sleep)
.– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/uh-SLEE[P]//ə(ʌ)ˈsliː[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Aspect
.– For this word, the “A” is short the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/æS.peh[k]-[t]//ˈæs.pɛ[k].[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

 

Aspects
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

– /æS-peh[k]-ts/ – /ˈæs.pɛ[k].ts–Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable – and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Aspirin
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the first “i” disappears, and the second “i” is an i-schwa

/æS-prihn//ˈæs.pɹə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Assailants
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-SAYL-ihn-ts/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈseɪl.ə(ɪ)n.ts/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Assault
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “au” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “u”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/uh-SUHL-[t]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈsʌl.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

 

Assaulted
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “au” combination is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/uh-SUHL-tih[d]//ə(ʌ).ˈsʌl.tə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Assemble
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/ə-SEHM-bəl//əˈsɛm.bəl/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Assembled
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ə-SEHM-bəl-[d]//əˈsɛm.bəl.[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Assertive
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-S’R-dihv/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈsɚ.ɾə(ɪ)v/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Assertiveness
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-S’R-dihv/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈsɚ.ɾə(ɪ)v.nə(ɪ)s/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Assess
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the first “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciations of this letter combination  in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-SEH-sing/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈsɛ.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Assessing
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the first “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue),the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciations of this letter combination  in The Common Tongue), and “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-SEH-sing/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈsɛ.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Assets
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” is short

– /æ-seh-ts//ˈæ.sɛ.ts/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Assign
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, and the “g” is silent

– /uh-SIGN/ – /(əʌ).ˈsaiːn/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Assigned
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, and the “g” is silent, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /uh-SIGN-[d]/ – /(əʌ).ˈsaiːn.[d]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

 

Assignment
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, the “g” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-SIGN-mihn-[t]/ – /(əʌ).ˈsaiːn.m(əɪ)n.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Assignments
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, the “g” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-SIGN-mihn-ts/ – /(əʌ).ˈsaiːn.m(əɪ)n.ts/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Assimilated
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the second “a” is a Long A / Long Diphthong, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uh-SIH-mih-lay-dih[d]//ə(ʌ).ˈsɪ.mə(ɪ).leiː.ɾə(ɪ)ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Assist
.– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/uh-sihs-[t]//ə(ʌ)ˈsə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Assistance
.– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-SIHS-tihn-s//ə(ʌ)ˈsɪs.tə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

 

Assistant
.– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-SIHS-tihn-[t]//ə(ʌ)ˈsɪs.tə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Associate (noun)
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-SOH-see-ih[t]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈso.siː.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Associate (verb)
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-SOH-see-ay[t]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈso.siː.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Associated
.– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped but with the addition of the “-ed” ending – the “t” is a flap-t, and the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” (even if it’s stopped) – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uh-SOH-see-ay-tih[d]//ə(ʌ)ˈso.siː.eiː.tə(ɪ)ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Associates 
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-SOH-see-ih-ts//ə(ʌ).ˈso.siː.ə(ɪ).ts/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

 

Association
.– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-soh-see-AY-shihn//ə(ʌ)ˌso.siːˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Assume
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is long, and the final “e” is silent

– /uh-SOOM/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈsum/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Assumption
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s”,  the “u” is short, the “p” is almost stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə-SUH[P]-shihn//ə.ˈsʌm[p].ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Assure
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent.

/uh-SH’R/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Astonish
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is short, for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-STAH-nihsh/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈstɑ.nə(ɪ)ʃ/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Astonished
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is short, for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the “sh” combination, the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/uh-STAH-nihsh-[t]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈstɑ.nə(ɪ)ʃ.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Astor
 – For this word, the “A” is short, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æS-t’r//ˈæs.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Astounding
.– For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-STOWN-ding//ə(ʌ).ˈstaun.dɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Astronaut
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/æS-chrə-naw[t]//ˈæs.tʃɹə.nɔ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Asylum
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, and the “u” turns into a true-schwa

– /uh-SAI-ləm/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈsaiː.ləm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter A ) –


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