– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter A:  Au ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

Au

 

Aa . Ab . Ac . Ad . Af . Ag . Ah . Ai . Aj . Ak . Al . Am . An . Ap . Aq . Ar . As . At . Av . Aw

 

Audience
.– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long “e”, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AW-dee-ihn-s//ˈɔ.ɾiː.ə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

 

Audiences
.– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long “e”, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/AW-dee-ihn-sihz//ˈɔ.ɾiː.ə(ɪ)n.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Audio
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “o” is long

/AW-dee-yo//ˈɔ.ɾiː.jo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Audiologist
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “d” is a flap-d, the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/aw-dee-AH-lih-gihs-[t]//ɔ.ɾiː.ˈɑ.lə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Audit
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/AW-dih[t]//ˈɔ.ɾə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Auditor
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AW-dih-t’r//ˈɔ.ɾə(ɪ).tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Auditors
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/AW-dih-t’r-z//ˈɔ.ɾə(ɪ).tɚ.z/–Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Auditory
 – For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for “-ory” suffix – the “o” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the
long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AW-dih-tohr-ee//ˈɔ.ɾ.ə(ɪ).toɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Audits
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like an “aw” combination, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa

/AW-dih-ts//ˈɔ.ɾə(ɪ).ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

August
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “g” is hard, the “u” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is often stopped

/AW-gihs-[t]//ˈɔ.gə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Aunt
.– This word has two common pronunciations. In one: the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination – in the other: th “Au” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “a”, and in both versions: the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/awn-[t]//ɔn.[t]/ – Or – /æn-[t]//æn.[t]/ – Notice also that, in both pronunciations, the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Aurora Borealis
– For this term, in the first word, the “Au” combination turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is long, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa, – then for the second word, the “o” is long, the “e” is long, the “a” is short, and the “i” is an i-schwa

/uh-ROHR-uh-bohr-ee-æ-lihs//ə(ʌ)ˈɹoɹ.ə(ʌ).boɹ.iː.ˈæ.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress in the first word is on the second syllable, and the stress in the second word is on the third syllable

 

Australasia
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into a true-schwa, the third “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/aws-chrəl-AY-zhuh//ɔs.t ʃɹəl.ˈeiː.ʒə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Australia
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like an “Aw” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” is short, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/aw-SCHRæ-lee-uh//ɔs.ˈtʃɹæ.liː.ə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Australian
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” is short, and for the “-ian” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and
the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/aws-CHRæ-lee-ihn-z//ɔs.tʃɹæ.liː.ə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Australians
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” is short, and for the “-ian” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/aws-CHRæ-lee-ihn-z//ɔs.tʃɹæ.liː.ə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Austria
– For this country name, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/AWS-chtree-uh//ˈɔs.tʃɹiː.ə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Austrian
– For this country name, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the second “a” turns into an i-schwa

/AWS-chtree-ihn//ˈɔs.tʃɹiː.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Authentic
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “e” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/aw-THEHN-tihk//ɔ.ˈθɛn.tə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Authenticate
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “e” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/aw-THEHN-tih-kay[t]//ɔ.ˈθɛn.tə(ɪ).ke[iː][t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Author
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “th” is un-voiced, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AW-th’r//ˈɔ.θɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Authoritarian
– For this word, the “Au” turns into a true-schwa, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa,the second “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ian” suffix – the “i” (converted from the letter “y” of the root-word) is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə-thohr-ih-TAYR-ee-ihn//ˌə.θoɹ.ə(ɪ).ˈteɪɹ.iː. ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Authoritative
– For this word, the “Au” turns into a true-schwa, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the third “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə-thohr-ih-TAY-dihv//ˌə.θoɹ.ə(ɪ).ˈte.də(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Authorization
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “o” disappears, the “i” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/aw-th’r-ai-ZAY-shihn//ˌɔ.θɚ.aiː.ˈzeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Authorizations
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “o” disappears, the “i” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/aw-th’r-ai-ZAY-shihn-z//ˌɔ.θɚ.aiː.ˈzeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Authorized
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “th” is un-voiced, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the “e” joins with the “-ed” ending, and the final “d” of the “-ed” ending is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/AW-th’r-aiz-[d]//ˈɔ.θɚ.aiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

 

Authors
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “th” is un-voiced, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/AW-th’r-z//ˈɔ.θɚ.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable – and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Authority
.– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/uh-THOHR-ih-dee//ə(ʌ)ˈθoɹ.ə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Autocratic
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, the “o” is long, the “c” is hard, the second “a” is short, the second “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c”is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/aw-doh-KRæ-dih[k]//ˌɔ.ɾo.ˈkɹæ.ɾə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Automatic
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like in the “Aw” combination, the “t” is a flap-d, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is short, the second “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/aw-də--dihk//ɔ.ɾə(ʌ).ˈmæ.ɾə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Automatically
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like in the “Aw” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is short, the second “t” is a flap-t, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/aw-də--dihk-lee//ɔ.ɾə(ʌ).ˈmæ.ɾə(ɪ)k.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Autonomous
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa

/aw-TAH-nih-mihs//ɔ.ˈtɑ.nə(ɪ).mə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Autonomy
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/aw-TAH-nə-mee//ɔ.ˈtɑ.nə.miː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Autopilot
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, the first “o” is long, the “i” is long, the second “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/AW-doh-pai-lih[t]//ˈɔ.ɾo.paiː.lə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Autumn
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, the “u” is a u-schwa, and the final “n” is silent

/AW-duhm//ˈɔ.ɾə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Auxiliary
.– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/awg-ZIH-lee-ary//ɔtg.ˈzɪ.liː.eɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter A ) –


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