– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter A:  Av ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

Av

 

Aa . Ab . Ac . Ad . Af . Ag . Ah . Ai . Aj . Ak . Al . Am . An . Ap . Aq . Ar . As . At . Au . Aw

 

Available
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “ai” combination is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to another), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-VAYL-uh-bəl/ – /ʌ.ˈveɪ.lə.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Avant-Garde
 – For this term, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the second “a” is pronounced like a short letter “o”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “G” is hard, the third “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/ah-vahn[t]-GAHR-[d]/ – /ɑ.vɑn[t]-ˈgɑɹ[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

 

Avatar
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the last “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

– /AH-vuh-tahr/ – /ˈɑ.və(ʌ).tɑɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Avenue
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ue” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”

/æ-vih-noo//ˈæ.və(ɪ).nu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Avenues
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “ue” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/æ-vih-nooz//ˈæ.və(ɪ).nuz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Average
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “e” disappears, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æV-rihdʒ/ – /ˈæv.ɹə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Aversion
 – For this word, the “A” is a u-schwa, the “e” disappears, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-V’R-zhihn//ə(ʌ).ˈvɚ.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Aviation
 – For this word, the “A” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ay-vee-YAY-shihn//ˌeiː.viː.jeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Avocado
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “o” is long

– /ah-və-KAH-doh/ – /ɑ.və.ˈkɑ.ɾo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

 

Avoid
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uh-VOY-[d]//ə(ʌ).ˈvoiː.[d]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as third syllable

 

Avoidance
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the final “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-VOY-dihn-s//ə(ʌ).ˈvoiː.də(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter A ) –


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