– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter A:  Ad, Ae, Af ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily. The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

Aa

 

Aa – Ac . Ae . Af . Ag – Ai . Aj – Al . Am – Ao . Ap – Ar . As – Au . Av – Az

 

Ad
 – For this word, the “A” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/æ[d]/ – /æ[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Adage
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ-dihdʒ/ – /ˈæ.ɾə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Adapt
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is short, and the “p” is (usually) stopped

– /uh-[P]-t/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈdæ[p].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Adaptability
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ability” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-dæ[p]-tuh-BIH-lih-dee//ə(ʌ).dæ[p].tə(ʌ).ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Add
 – For this word, the “A” is short, and the “dd” combination turns into a single flap-d but is often stopped

/æ[d]/ – /æ[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Addicted
.– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “dd” combination is pronounced like the single letter “d” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uh-DIH[K]-dih[d]//ə(ʌ).ˈdɪ[k].də(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Adding
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “dd” combination is pronounced like the single flap-d (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ-ding//ˈæ.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Addition
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “dd” combination is pronounced simply as the single letter “d” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-DIH-shihn//ə(ʌ).ˈdɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Additionally
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “dd” combination is pronounced simply as the single letter “d” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is short, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-DIH-shihn-ə-lee//ə(ʌ).ˈdɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.ə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Address (noun)
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “dd” combination is pronounced like the soft “g”, and for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æ-dʒrehs//ˈæ.dʒɹɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Address (verb)
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “dd” combination is pronounced like the soft “g”, and for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-dʒREHS/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈdʒɹɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Addressed
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “dd” combination is pronounced like the soft “g”, for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – th “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

– /uh-dʒREH-st/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈdʒɹɛ.st/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Adept (adjective)
– For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, and the “p” is (usually) stopped

/ə-DEH[P]-t/ – /ə.ˈdɛ[p].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Adept (noun)
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “e” is short, and the “p” is (usually) stopped

/æ-deh[p]-t/ – /ˈæ.dɛ[p].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Adequate
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination, and for the “-ate” suffix –the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ-dih-kwih[t]/ – /ˈæ.ɾə(ɪ).kwə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Adhere
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the first “e” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/æd-HEER//æɾ.ˈhiːɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Adipose
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

– /æ-dih-pohz/ – /ˈæɾ.ə(ɪ).poz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Adjective
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is almost stopped, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the first “e” is short, the “c” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ[D]-dʒeh[k]-tihv//ˈæ[d].dʒɛ[k].tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Adjust
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “d” is stopped, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “u” is short, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/uh-dʒUH-s[t]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈdʒʌ.s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “st” (even when the “t” is stopped) ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Adjustments
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “d” is stopped, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “u” is short, the first “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-dʒUHS-[t]-mihn-ts/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈdʒʌs.[t].mə(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Administer
 – For this word, the “A” turns into an i-schwa, the “d” is (often) stopped, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ih[d]-MIH-nih-st’r/ – /ə(ɪ)[d].ˈmɪ.nə(ɪ).stɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Administered
 – For this word, the “A” turns into an i-schwa, the “d” is (often) stopped, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-er” suffix – the first “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ih[d]-MIH-nih-st’r[d]/ – /ə(ɪ)[d].ˈmɪ.nə(ɪ).stɚ[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Administration
 – For this word, the “A” turns into an i-schwa, the “d” is is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ih[d]-mih-nihs-CHRAY-shihn/ – /ə(ɪ)[ɾ].ˌmɪ.nə(ɪ)s.ˈtʃɹeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Administrative
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa the “d” is (usually) stopped, the first “i” is short, the second “i” turns into an i-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the second “t” (usually) turns into a flap-d, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə[d]-MIH-nihs-chray-dihv//ə[d].ˈmɪ.nə(ɪ)s.tʃɹeiː.ɾə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Admirable
.– For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the “i” disappears, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to another), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æ[ɾ]-m’r-uh-bəl/ – /ˈæ[ɾ].məɹ.ə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Admiration
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the “i” disappears, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ[d]-m’r-AY-shihn//ˌæ[ɾ].mɚ.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Admire
 – For this word, the “A” turns into an true-schwa, the “d” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ire” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə[d]-MIGH-y’r//ə[d].ˈmʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Admirer
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), there is an dditional phantom letter “r” in-between the first “r” and the “e” (this is a product of two of the same sound right next to each other), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə[d]-MIGH-y’r-rər-z//ə[d].mʌiː.jɚ.ɹɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Admirers
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), there is an dditional phantom letter “r” in-between the first “r” and the “e” (this is a product of two of the same sound right next to each other), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə[d]-MIGH-y’r-rər-z//ə[d].mʌiː.jɚ.ɹɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Admit
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ə[d]-MIH[T]/ – /ə[ɾ].ˈmɪ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Admits
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is (usually) stopped, and the “i” is short

– /ə[d]-MIH-ts/ – /ə[d].ˈmɪ.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Admitting
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the first “i” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə[d]-MIH-ding/ – /ə[ɾ].ˈmɪ.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Adolescence
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “e” is short, the “sc” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s”, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ-də-LEH-sihn-s/ – /ˌæ.ɾə.ˈlɛ.sə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the major stress is on the third syllable and that there is a minor stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Adopt
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped

/uh-DAH[P]-t/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈdɑ[p].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Adopted
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped, the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uh-DAH[P]-tih[d]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈdɑ[p].tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Adrenaline
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” is short, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is short, and the final “e” is silent

/uh-dʒREH-nuh-lihn//ə(ʌ).ˈdʒɹɛ.nə(ʌ).lɪn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Adult
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “u” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/uh-DUHL-[t]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈdʌl.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Adults
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, and the “u” is short

– /uh-DUHL-ts/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈdʌl.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Advance
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, the second “a” is short, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /ə[d]-VæN-s/ – /ə[ɾ].ˈvæn.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and the “s” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Advanced
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” isa flap-d but is (often) stopped, the second “a” is short, the “c” is soft, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

– /ə[d]-VæN-st/ – /ə[ɾ].ˈvæn.st/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Advancement
 – For this word, the “A” turns into an true-schwa, the “d” is (usually) stopped, the second “a” is short, the “c” is soft, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə[d]-VæNS-mihn-[t]/ – /ə[d].ˈvæns.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Advantage
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is (often) stopped, the second “a” is short, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /əd-VæN-tihdʒ/ – /əd.ˈvæn.tə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Advantages
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-scwa, the “d” is (usually) stopped, the second “a” is short, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/əd-VæN-tih-dʒihz/ – /əd.ˈvæn.tə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

 

Advantageous
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, the second “a” is short, the third “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphtong, the “g” is soft, and for the “eou” combination turns into an i-schwa

– /æ[d]-væn-TAY-dʒihs/ – /æ[d].væn.ˈteiː.dʒə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

 

Adventure
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, the “e” is short, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə[d]-VEHN-ch’r/ – /ə[ɾ].ˈvɛn.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Adventuring
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is (usually) stopped, the “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə[d]-VEHN-ch’ring//ə[d].vɛn.tʃɚ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Adventurous
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is (usually) stopped, the “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə[d]-VEHN-ch’r-ihs//ə[d].vɛn.tʃɚ.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Adverb
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is almost stopped, the “e” disappears, and the final “b” is (usually) stopped

/æ[D]-v'[b]//ˈæ[d].vɚ[b]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Adversaries
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is (often) stopped, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/æ[D]-v’r-sayr-eez/ – /ˈæ[d].vɚ.seɪɹ.iːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Adversary
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is (often) stopped, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ[D]-v’r-sayr-ee/ – /ˈæ[d].vɚ.seɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Adverse
.– For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is (often) stopped, the “e” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/æ[d]-V’R-s//æ[d]ˈvɚs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Advert
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is (usually) stopped, the “e” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/æ[D]-v’r-[t]//ˈæ[d].vɚ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Advertise
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is (often) stopped, the “e” disappears, the first “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

– /æ[D]-v’r-taiz/ – /ˈæ[d].vɚ.taiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Advertisement
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is (often) stopped, the “e” disappears, the first “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æ[D]-v’r-taiz-mihn-[t]/ – /ˈæ[d].vɚ.taiːz.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

 

Advertising
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is (often) stopped, the “e” disappears, the first “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue

– /æD-v’r-tai-zing/ – /ˈæ[d].vɚ.taiː.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Advice
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ice” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə[d]-VIGHS//ə[ɾ].ˈvʌiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Advise
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/ə[d]-VAIZ/ – /ə[d].ˈvaiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Adviser
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə[d]-VAI-z’r/ – /ə[d].ˈvaiː.zɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Advisor
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə[d]-VAI-z’r/ – /ə[d].ˈvaiː.zɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Advocates
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is a flap-d (often) stopped, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ[D]-və-kih-ts//ˈæ[ɾ].və.kə(ɪ).ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that  –

Ae

 

Af

 

Affair
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the a “Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it) – (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/uh-FAYR/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈfeɪɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Affect
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/uh-FEH[K]-t/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈfɛ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Affection
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-FEHK-shihn/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈfɛk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Affiliation
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a’ is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-fih-lee-AY-shihn/ – /ə(ʌ).ˌfɪ.liː.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Afford
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/uh-FOHR-[d]//ə(ʌ).ˈfoɹ.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Affordable
.– For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply as the single letter “f”, the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to another), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə-FOHR-duh-bəl//ə.ˈfoɹ.də(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Afraid
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uh-FRAY[D]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈfɹeiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Africa
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

– /æ-frih-kuh/ – /ˈæ.fɹə(ɪ).kə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

African
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and the second “a” turns into an i-schwa

– /æ-frih-kihn/ – /ˈæ.fɹə(ɪ).kə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Africans
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /æ-frih-kihn-z/ – /ˈæ.fɹə(ɪ).kə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

 

After
 – For this word, the “A” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æF-t’r//ˈæf.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Afternoon
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “e” disappears, and the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/æf-t’r-NOON//ˌæf.tɚˈnun/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable  –

 

Afterwards
 – For this word, the “A” is short, and the “e” disappears, the second “a” disappears, the “d” is (often) stopped, and the final “z” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/æF-t’r-w’r[d]-z//ˈæf.tɚ.wɚ[d].z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “dz” ending (even when the “d” is stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter A ) –


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