– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter A:  Aj, Ak, Al ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily. The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

Aa

 

Aa – Ac . Ad – Af . Ag – Ai . Ak . Al . Am – Ao . Ap – ArAs – Au . Av – Az

 

Ak

 

Al

Alarm
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, and the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/uh-LAHRM//ə(ʌ).ˈlɑɹm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Alarmed
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “m” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/uh-LAHRM-d//ə(ʌ).ˈlɑɹm.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Alarming
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, and the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-LAHR-ming//ə(ʌ).ˈlɑɹ.mɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Alejandra
 – For this name, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “e” is pronounce like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “j” is pronounced like the letter “h”, the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/ah-lay-HAHN-dʒruh//ɑ.leiː.ˈhɑn.dʒɹə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Albeit
 – For this ridiculous pseudo-word, the the “A” is short, the “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “e” and the “i” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/æl-BEE-yih[t]//æl.ˈbiː.jə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Albums
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /æL-buhm-z/ – /ˈæl.bə(ʌ)m.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Alcohol
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “c” is hard, the first “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, and the second “o” is short

/AHL-koh-hahl//ˈɑl.ko.hɑl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Alive
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/uh-LAIV//ə(ʌ)ˈlaiːv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Align
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is long, and the “g” is silent

/uh-LAIN//ə(ʌ).ˈlaiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Aligned
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is long, the “g” is silent, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/uh-LAIN//ə(ʌ).ˈlaiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Alkaloids
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/æL-kuh-loyd-z//ˈæl.kə(ʌ).loiːd.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

 

All
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/awl//ɔl/

 

Allegory
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “o” is long, and the final letter “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/æ-lə-gohr-ee//ˈæ.lə.goɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Allergic
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” disappears, the “g” is soft, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-L’R-dʒihk/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈlɚ.dʒə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Allergies
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” disappears, the “g” is soft, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/æ-l’r-dʒeez//ˈæ.lɚ.dʒiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Allegations
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, the second “a” is a Long ‘A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/æ-lih-GAY-shihn-z/ – /æl.ə(ɪ).ˈgeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “z” ending acts like a fifth syllable –

 

Alleviate
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-LEE-vee-yay[t]//ˈe[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Alliance
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ll” is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-LAI-ihn-s/ – /(əʌ).ˈlaiː.(əɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

 

Allied
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, and since the root-word ends with the letter “y” (converted to an “i” for the addition of the suffix) – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

/æ-lai[d]//ˈæ.laiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Allies
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, the “e” of the “-es” ending is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/æ-laiz/ – /ˈæ.laiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Allocate
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ-loh-kay[t]//ˈæ.lo.ke[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Allocated
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “c” is hard, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped but with the addition of the “-ed” ending – the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is pronounced like an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /æ-loh-kay-dih[d]/ – /ˈæl.o.ke.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

 

Allocating
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “c” is hard, the second “a” is Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ-loh-kay-ding//ˈæl.o.keiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Allow
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “now” or “how” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-LOW/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈlau/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Allowance
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounce simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “now” or “how” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-LOW-ihn-s//ə(ʌ).ˈlau.ə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Allowed
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “now” or “how” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root word ends with the sound of the  “ow” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /uh-LOW[D]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈlau[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Ally
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/æ-lai//ˈæ.laiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Almost
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/AHL-mohs-[t]//ˈɑl.mos.[t]/ –  –Or…
/ahl-MOHS-[t]//ɑl.ˈmos.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress for this word can be on either syllable  –

 

Alone
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/uh-LOHN//ə(ʌ)ˈlon/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Along
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “wing” or “fang” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/uh-LAWNG//ə(ʌ)ˈlɔŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Alongside
.– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “wing” or “fang” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/uh-lawngSAI-[d]//ə(ʌ)ˌlɔŋˈsaiː.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllablethe major stress is on the third syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Aloud (a’Loud)
.– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the “d” ending is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uh-LOW-[d]//ə(ʌ)ˈlau.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Alphabet
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/æL-fuh-beh-[t]//ˈæl.fə(ʌ).bɛ.t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Alphabetical
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æl-fuh-BEH-dih-kəl//ˌæl.fə(ʌ).ˈbɛ.ɾə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Alphabetically
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ally” suffix – the “a” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/æl-fuh-BEH-dih-klee//ˌæl.fə(ʌ).ˈbɛ.ɾə(ɪ).kliː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Already
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/awl-REH-dee//ɔlˈrɛ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Also
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “o” is long

/AWL-so//ˈɔl.so/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Alter
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AWL-t’r//ˈɔl.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Alternate (adjective)
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /AWL-t’r-nih[t]/ – /ˈɔl.tɚ.nə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Alternate (verb)
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /AWL-t’r-nay[t]/ – /ˈɔl.tɚ.ne[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Alternative
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /awl-T’R-nuh-dihv/ – /ˈɔl.tɚ.nə.ɾ(əɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Alternatives
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /awl-T’R-nuh-dihv-z/ – /ˈɔl.tɚ.nə.ɾ(əɪ)v.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

 

Alternatively
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/awl-T’R-nuh-dihv-lee//ˈɔl.tɚ.nə.ɾ(əɪ)v.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Although
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “th” is voiced, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the long letter “o”, and the “gh” is silent

– /awl-THOH/ – /ɔl.ˈðo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Altogether (All-together)
.– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the first “e” is short, the “th” combination is voiced, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/awl-tə-GEH-th’r//ɔl.tə.ˈgɛ.ðɚ/ – Notice also that there is a stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Altruist (All-true-ist)
.– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AWL-chroo-is[t]//ˈɔl.tʃɹu.ə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Altruistic (All-true-ist-ic)
.– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is long, for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/awl-chroo-IHS.tih[k]//ɔl.tʃɹu.ˈə(ɪ)s.tə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Always (All-ways)
.– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/AWL-ways//ˈɔl.weiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Alzheimer’s
.– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, “ei” combination is pronounced like the long letter “i”, the second “e” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/AWLZ-hai-m’r-z//ˈɔlz.haiː.mɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter A ) –


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