– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter A ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.


Aa

 

A – Am . An . Ao . Ap . Aq . Ar . As . At . Au . Av . Aw . Ax . Ay . Az

An

An
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “e”

/ehn//ɛn/

Anaglyph
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “y” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/æN-uh-glihf/ – /ˈæ.nə(ʌ).ɡlə(ɪ)f/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Analyses
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, and second “a” is short, the “y” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is long, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

– /uh--lə-seez/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈnæ.lə.siːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Analysis
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, and second “a” is short, the “y” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-sis” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh--lə-sihs/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈnæ.lə.sə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Analyst
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “y” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/æ-nuh-lih-s[t]//ˈæ.nə(ʌ).lə(ɪ).s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “st” ending (even when the “t” is stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Analyze
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, and the final “e” is silent

/æN-uh-laiz//ˈæ.nə(ʌ).laiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Analyzing
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard
pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ-nuh-lai-zing//ˈæ.nə(ʌ).laiː.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ancestor
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is soft, the “e” is short, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æN-sehs-t’r//ˈæn.sehs.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ancestors
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is soft, the “e” is short, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /æN-sehs-t’r-z//ˈæn.sehs.tɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Ancient
 – For this word, the “A” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the “ch” combination, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AYN-chihn[t]/ – /ˈeiːn.tʃə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

And
 – For this word, the “A” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/æn-[d]//æn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Andes
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “e” is long, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/æN-deez/ – /ˈæn.diːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Androgynous (Androgyn-ous)
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” is short, the “g” is soft, the “y” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æn-dʒRAH-dʒih-nihs//æn.ˈdʒɹɑ.dʒə(ɪ).nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Anecdotal
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard
pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æ-nihk-doh-dəl/ – /ˈæ.nə(ɪ)k.do.ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Anecdote
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “o” is long, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /æ-nihk-doh[t]/ – /ˈæ.nə(ɪ)k.do[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Anesthesiology
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “th” is un-voiced, the second “e” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ology” suffix – the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æ-nihs-thee-zee-AH-lə-dʒee/ – /æ.nə(ɪ)s.θiː.ziː.ˈɑ.lə.dʒiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fifth syllable –

Anesthetics
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “th” is un-voiced, the second “e” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æ-nihs-THEH-dih-ks/ – /æ.nə(ɪ)s.ˈθɛ.ɾə(ɪ).ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

Anger
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination, the “g” is hard (pronounced separately from the “ng” combination), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æNG-g’r//ˈæŋ.gɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Angle
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination, the “g” is hard (pronounced separately from the “ng” combination), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “g” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent

/æNG-gəl//ˈæŋ.gəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Angry
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination, the “g” is hard (pronounced separately from the “ng” combination), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/æNG-gree/ – /ˈæŋ.gɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Animal
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ-nih-məl//ˈæ.nə(ɪ).məl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ankle
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “k” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent

/æNG-kəl//ˈæŋ.kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Anniversary
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æn-ə-V’R-sə-ree/ – /æn.ə.ˈvɚ.sə.ɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Announce
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a the u-schwa, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/uh-NOWN-s//ə(ʌ)ˈnaun.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

Announced
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ou” combination sounds like the “ow” combination, the “c” is soft, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the”e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

– /uh-NOWN-st/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈnaun.st/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a third syllable –

Announcement
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a the u-schwa, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “c” is soft, the first “e” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-NOWN-smihn-[t]//ə(ʌ)ˈnaun.smə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (whne not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Annoy
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “toy” and “boy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/uh-NOY//ə(ʌ)ˈnoiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable  –

Annoyed
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “toy” or “boy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “y” – the “e” of the “-ed ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uh-NOY-[d]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈnoiː.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Annoying
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “toy” or “boy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-NOY-ing/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈnoiː.ɪŋ/ – notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Annoys
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “nn” combination is pronounced like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “toy” or “boy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/uh-NOY-z//ə(ʌ).ˈnoiː.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Annual
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æN-you-əl/ – /ˈæn.ju.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Annually
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æN-you-ə-lee/ – /ˈæn.ju.ə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Anomaly
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is short, the second “a” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/uh-NAH-mə-lee//ə(ʌ).ˈnɑ.mə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Anonymous
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is short, the “y” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-NAH-nih-mihs//ə(ʌ).ˈnɑ.nə(ɪ).mə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Another
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “th” is voiced, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-NUH-th’r/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈnʌ.ðɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Answer
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “w” is silent, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æN-s’r/ – /ˈæn.sɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Anthropology
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ology” suffix –  the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æn-thrə-PAH-lih-dʒee//ˌæn.θɹə.ˈpɑ.lə(ɪ).dʒiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Anticipate
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the first “i” is short, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æn-TIH-cih-pay[t]//ænˈtɪ.sə(ɪ).pe[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Antique
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “qu” combination sounds like the letter “k” and the final “e” is silent

– /æn-TEEK/ – /æn.ˈtiːk/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Antonym
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the “y” turns into an i-schwa

/æN-tə-nihm/ – /ˈæn.tə.nə(ɪ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Anxieties
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “x” direct after it), the “x” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is long, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (usually) a flap-t, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter z

/æng-ZAI-ih-deez/ – /æŋ.ˈzaiː.ə(ɪ).ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Anxiety
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “x” direct after it), the “g” is hard but is almost stopped, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is long, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/æng-ZAI-ih-dee/ – /æŋ.ˈzaiː.ə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable  –

Anxious
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “x” directly after it), the “xi” combination is pronounced like a “ksh” combination, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æNGK-shihs/ – /ˈæŋk.ʃə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Any
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “e”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/EH-nee//ˈɛ.niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Anybody (Any-body)
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “e”, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/EH-nee-buh-dee//ˈɛ.niː.bʌ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Anyone (Any-one)
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “e”, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom “w” in-between the “y” and the “o”, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/EH-nee-wuhn//ˈɛ.niː.wʌn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Anything (Any-thing)
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “e”, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “th” combination is un-voiced, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EH-nee-thing//ˈɛ.niː.θɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Anyway (Any-way)
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “e”, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “ay” combination is pronounced simply like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/EH-nee-way//ˈɛ.niː.weiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Anywhere (Any-where)
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “e”, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the first “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/EH-nee-wayr//ˈɛ.niː.weɪɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Ao

 

Ap

Apart (a’Part)
– For this word, The “A” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/uh-PAHR-[t]//ə(ʌ)ˈ.pɑɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Apartheid (Apart-heid)
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “th” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “t” (the “h” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “t”), the “ei” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uh-PAHR-tai[d]//ə(ʌ).ˈpɑɹ.taiː[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Apartment (Apart-ment)
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the first “t” is stopped, and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-PAHR-[t]-mihn[t]//ə(ʌ)ˈ.pɑɹ.[t].mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Apologies
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is soft, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/uh-PAH-lə-dʒeez//ə(ʌ)ˈpɑ.lə.dʒiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Apologize
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is soft, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

– /uh-PAH-lə-dʒaiz/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈpɑ.lə.dʒaiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Apologized
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into an true-schwa, the “g” is soft, the “i” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e”  of the “-ed” ending is silent

– /uh-PAH-lə-dʒaiz-d/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈpɑ.lə.dʒaiːz.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a fifth syllable

Apology
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ology” suffix – the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-PAH-lə-dʒee/ – /ə(ʌ)ˈpɑ.lə.dʒiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Apparatus
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” turns into a true-schwa, the third “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “u” turns into an i-schwa

– /æp-ə--dihs/ – /æ.pəˈɹæ.ɾ(əɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Apparent
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-PAYR-ihn-[t]//ə(ʌ).ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)n.t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Apparently
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is
(often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/uh-PAYR-ihn[t]-lee//ə(ʌ)ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)n[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Appeal
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/uh-PEEL/ – /ə(ʌ).piːl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Appear
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/uh-PEER//ə(ʌ)ˈpiːɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Appearance
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-PEER-ihn-s//ə(ʌ)ˈpiːɹ.ə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Appeared
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the sing letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “e”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is a flap-d, but is (often) stopped

/uh-PEER-[d]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈpiːɹ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Appendectomy
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the second “e” is also short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, and for the “-omy” suffix – the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æ-pehn-DEHKT-uh-mee/ – /ˌæ.pənˈdɛk.tə(ʌ).miː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

Appendicitis
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the first “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and for the “-itis” suffix – the second “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and the last “i” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-pehn-dih-SIGH-dihs/ – /ˌə(ʌ).ˈpɛn.də.sʌiː.ɾə(ʌ)s/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the stress is on the fourth syllable

Appendix
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p”, the “e” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/uh-PEHN-dih-ks//ə(ʌ).ˈpɛn.də(ɪ).ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ks” ending acts like a fourth syllable –

Appetite
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the last “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /æ-pih-tigh[t]//ˈæ.pə(ɪ).tʌiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Appetizer
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “i” is long, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ-pih-tai-z’r/ – /ˈæ.pə(ɪ).taiː.zɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Appetizers
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/æ-pə.tai-z’r-z//ˈæ.pə.taiː.zɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Apple
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent

/æ-pəl//ˈæ.pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Apples
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/æ-pəl-z//ˈæ.pəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

Appliances
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/uh-PLAI-ihn-sihz/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈplaiː.ə(ɪ)n.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Application
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æp-lih-KAY-shihn//æp.lə(ɪ).ˈkeiː.ʃə ( ɪ )n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Applies
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/uh-PLAIZ//ə(ʌ).ˈplaiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Apply
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/uh-PLAI//ə(ʌ).ˈplaiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Appoint
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/uh-POYN-[t]//ə(ʌ)ˈpoiːn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Appointment
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-POYN-[t]-mihn[t]//ə(ʌ)ˈpoiːn.[t].mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Appreciate
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is long, the “c” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-PREE-shee-ay[t]/ – /(əʌ).ˈpɹiː.ʃiː.eiː(t)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Appreciated
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination sounds simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is long, the “c” is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped but with the addition of the “-ed” ending – the “t” is a flap-t, and the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” (even if it’s stopped) – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /uh-PREE-shee-ay-tih[d]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈpɹiː.ʃiː.eiː.ɾə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Appreciation
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is long, the “c” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-pree-shee-AY-shihn/ – /ə(ʌ).ˌpɹiː.ʃiː.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

Appreciative
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is long, the “c” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is the product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-PREE-shyuh-tihv//ə(ʌ)ˈpɹiː.ʃjə(ʌ).tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Apprehensive
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the second “e” is short, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æp-ree-HEHN-sihv/ – /ˌæp.ɹiː.ˈhɛn.sə(ʌ)v/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

Apprentice
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and for the “-ice” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-PREHN-tihs/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈpɹɛn.tə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Apprenticeship
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, for the “-ice” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ship” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-PREHN-tihs-shih[p]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈpɹɛn.tə(ɪ)s.ʃə(ɪ)[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Approach
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “oa” combination is pronounced like the long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-PROHCH/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈprotʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Appropriate
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-PROH-pree-ih[t]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈpɹo.pɹiː.ə(ɪ)t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Approval
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-PROO-vəl//ə(ʌ).ˈpɹu.vəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Approve
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/uh-PROOV//ə(ʌ)ˈ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Approved
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “v” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/uh-PROOV-d/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈpɹuv.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Approving
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-PROOV-ing//ə(ʌ)ˈpru.vɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Approximately
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ately” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, the “e” is silent, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-PRAHK-sih-mih[t]-lee//ə(ʌ)ˈpɹɑk.sə(ɪ).mə(ɪ)[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Apps
 – For this abbreviation of the word “applications”, the “A” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/æps/ – /ˈæps/ –

April
 – For this word, the “A” is long, and the “i” turns into a true-schwa

– /AY-prəl//ˈeɪ.pɹəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Aq

Aquarium
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “qu” combination sounds like the “kw” combination, the second “a” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “u” turns into a u-schwa

/uh-KWAYR-ee-uhm//ə(ʌ).ˈkweɪɹ.iː.ə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Ar

Arab
 – For this word, the “A” is long, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “b” is (often) stopped

/AYR-uh[b]//ˈeɪɹ.ə(ʌ)[b]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Arbitration
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ahr-bih-CHRAY-shihn/ – /ɑɹ.bə(ɪ).ˈtʃɹeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Archer
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AHR-ch’r/ – /ˈɑɹ.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Architect
 – For this word, the “A” sounds like the short letter “o”, the “ch” combination sounds like the letter “k”, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /AHR-kih-tehk-[t]/ – /ˈɑr.kə(ʌ).tɛk.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable –

Architecture
 – For this word, the “A” sounds like the short letter “o”, the “ch” combination sounds like the letter “k”, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /AHR-kih-tehk-ch’r/ – /ˈɑr.kə(ʌ).tɛk.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Are
 – This word is pronounced exactly like the name for the name of the letter “R”

– /ahr/ – /ɑr/ –

Area
 – For this word, the “A” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” is long, and the final “a” is pronounced like the short letter “u”

– /AYR-ee-uh/ – /ˈeɪɹ.iː.ʌ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Arena
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is long, and the final “a” is pronounced like the short letter “u”

/uh-REE-nuh/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈɹiː.nʌ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Aren’t
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the “e” disappears, and the “‘t” is (often) stopped

/ahrn-[t]//ɑɹn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Argentina
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/ahr-dʒehn-TEE-nuh//ɑɹ.dʒɛn.ˈtiː.nə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Argentinian
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ian” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ahr-dʒə(ɪ)n-TIH-nee-yihn//ɑɹ.dʒə(ɪ)n.ˈtɪ.niː.jə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Arguably
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ably” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AHR-gyoo-uh-blee//ˈɑɹ.gju.ə(ʌ).bliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Argue
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is hard, and the “ue” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”

/AHR-gyoo//ˈɑɹ.gju/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Argues
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is hard, the “ue” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /AHR-gyouz/ – /ˈɑɹ.gjuz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Arguing
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AHR-gyoo-ing//ˈˈɑɹ.gju.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable  –

Argument
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /AHR-gyoo-mihn[t]/ – /ˈɑɹ.gju.mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Arise
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/ə-RAIZ/ – /ə.ˈɹaiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Arithmetic
 – For this word, the “A” is an u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the “th combination is un-voiced, the “e” is a true-schwa, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/uh-RIHTH-mə-tih[k]//ə(ʌ).ˈɹɪθ.mə.tə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Arkansas
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the third “a” is pronounced like an “aw” combination, and the final “s” is silent

/AHR-kihn-saw/ – /ˈɑɹ.kə(ɪ)n.sɔ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Arm
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”,

– /ahrm/ – /ɑɹm/ – Notice also that –

Armadillo
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the letter “o” is long

/ahr-muh-DIH-loh//ɑɹ.mə(ʌ)ˈdɪ.lo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Armed
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “m” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/ahrm-d/ – /ɑɹm.d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable –

Arms
– For this word,the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ahrm-z//ɑɹm.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

Army
– For this word,the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/AHR-mee//ˈɑɹ.miː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Around
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/uh-ROWN-[d]//ə(ʌ)ˈɹaun.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Arrange
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /uh-RAYN-dʒ/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈreiːn.dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and the the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

Arranged
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the soft letter “g” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced almost like the letter “t” (this is due to the soft “g” sound directly before it)

– /uh-RAYN-dʒ-t/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈreiːn.dʒ.t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and the the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Arrangement
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, the first “e” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-RAYN-dʒ-mihn-[t]//ə(ʌ)ˈɹeiːn.dʒ.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable –

Arranging
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-RAYN-dʒing/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈreiːn.dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Arrest
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/uh-REHS-[t]//ə(ʌ)ˈɹɛs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Arrested
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uh-REHS-dih[d]//ə(ʌ).ˈɹɛs.də(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Arrival
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-RAI-vəl//ə(ʌ)ˈɹaiː.vəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Arrive
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, and the “e” is silent

– /uh-RAIV/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈɹaiːv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Arrived
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “v” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /uh-RAIV-[d]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈɹaiːv.[d]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

Arrogant
 – For this word, the “A” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /AYR-uh-gihn-[t]/ – /ˈeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).gə(ɪ)n.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Arrow
– For this word, the “A” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” is long, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (the letter “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”)

/AYR-oh//ˈeɪɹ.o/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Art
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ahr-[t]//ɑɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Article
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “c” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent

/AHR-dih-kəl//ˈɑɹ.ɾə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Articles
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “c” and the “l”, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/AHR-dih-kəl-z/ – /ˈɑɹ.ɾə(ɪ).kəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Artificial
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is a flap-t, the first “i” turns into an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the “-cial” suffix – the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ahr-dih-FIH-shəl//ɑɹ.ɾə(ɪ).ˈfɪ.ʃəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Artist
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the first “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ist” suffix –  the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AHR-dihs-[t]//ˈɑɹ.ɾə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Artistic
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, for the “-ist” suffix –  the “i” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ahr-TIHS-dihk/ /ɑɹˈtə(ɪ)s.ɾə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Artists
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often)
stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /AHR-dihs-ts/ – /ˈɑɹ.ɾə(ɪ)s.ts/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable –

As

As
 – For this word, the “A” is short, and the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

– /æz/ /æz/ –

ASA
 – For this acronym (as with any acronym that does not spell a discernible word) we say the names for each individual letter

– /ay-ehs-ay/ – /eiː-ɛs-eiː/ – 

Ashes
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/æ-shiz//ˈæ.ʃə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ashamed
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and since the root-word ends with the letter “m” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/uh-SHAYM-[d]//ə(ʌ)ˈʃeiːm.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Asia
 – For this word, the “A” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “si” is pronounced as the voiced “sh” combination, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

– /AY-zhuh/ – /ˈeiː.ʒə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress in on the first syllable

Asian
 – For this word, the “A” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the second “a” turns into an i-schwa

– /AY-zhihn/ – /ˈeiː.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Aside
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is long, the “d” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/uh-SAI-[d]//ə(ʌ)ˈsaiː.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Ask
 – For this word, the “A” is short, and the “k” is (often) stopped

/æs-[k]//æs.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Asks
 – For this word, the “A” is short

/æs-ks//æs.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable

Asked
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “k” is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/æs-[k]-t/ – /ˈæs-[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable –

Asleep (a’Sleep)
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/uh-SLEE[P]//ə(ʌ)ˈsliː[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Aspect
– For this word, the “A” is short the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/æS.peh[k]-[t]//ˈæs.pɛ[k].[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Aspects
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

– /æS-peh[k]-ts/ – /ˈæs.pɛ[k].ts/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable – and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

Aspirin
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the first “i” disappears, and the second “i” is an i-schwa

/æS-prihn//ˈæs.pɹə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Assailants
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-SAYL-ihn-ts/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈseɪl.ə(ɪ)n.ts/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Assault
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “au” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “u”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/uh-SUHL-[t]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈsʌl.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Assaulted
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “au” combination is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/uh-SUHL-tih[d]//ə(ʌ).ˈsʌl.tə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Assemble
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/ə-SEHM-bəl//əˈsɛm.bəl/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Assembled
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ə-SEHM-bəl-[d]//əˈsɛm.bəl.[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Assertive
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-S’R-dihv/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈsɚ.ɾə(ɪ)v/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Assertiveness
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss”
combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-S’R-dihv/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈsɚ.ɾə(ɪ)v.nə(ɪ)s/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Assess
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the first “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciations of this letter combination  in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-SEH-sing/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈsɛ.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Assessing
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the first “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue),the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciations of this letter combination  in The Common Tongue), and “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-SEH-sing/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈsɛ.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Assets
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” is short

– /æ-seh-ts//ˈæ.sɛ.ts/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

Assign
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, and the “g” is silent

– /uh-SIGN/ – /(əʌ).ˈsaiːn/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Assigned
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, and the “g” is silent, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /uh-SIGN-[d]/ – /(əʌ).ˈsaiːn.[d]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Assignment
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, the “g” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-SIGN-mihn-[t]/ – /(əʌ).ˈsaiːn.m(əɪ)n.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Assignments
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, the “g” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-SIGN-mihn-ts/ – /(əʌ).ˈsaiːn.m(əɪ)n.ts/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Assist
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/uh-sihs-[t]//ə(ʌ)ˈsə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Assistance
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-SIHS-tihn-s//ə(ʌ)ˈsɪs.tə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Assistant
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-SIHS-tihn-[t]//ə(ʌ)ˈsɪs.tə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Associate (noun)
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-SOH-see-ih[t]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈso.siː.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Associate (verb)
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-SOH-see-ay[t]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈso.siː.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Associated
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped but with the addition of the “-ed” ending – the “t” is a flap-t, and the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” (even if it’s stopped) – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uh-SOH-see-ay-tih[d]//ə(ʌ)ˈso.siː.eiː.tə(ɪ)ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Associates 
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-SOH-see-ih-ts//ə(ʌ).ˈso.siː.ə(ɪ).ts/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

Association
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-soh-see-AY-shihn//ə(ʌ)ˌso.siːˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Assume
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is long, and the final “e” is silent

– /uh-SOOM/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈsum/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Assumption
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s”,  the “u” is short, the “p” is almost stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə-SUH[P]-shihn//ə.ˈsʌm[p].ʃə ( ɪ )n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Assure
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent.

/uh-SH’R/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Astonish
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is short, for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-
voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-STAH-nihsh/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈstɑ.nə(ɪ)ʃ./ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Astonished
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is short, for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-
voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the “sh” combination, the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/uh-STAH-nihsh-[t]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈstɑ.nə(ɪ)ʃ.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Astor
 – For this word, the “A” is short, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æS-t’r//ˈæs.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Astounding
– For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-STOWN-ding//ə(ʌ).ˈstaun.dɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Astronaut
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/æS-chrə-naw[t]//ˈæs.tʃɹə.nɔ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Asylum
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, and the “u” turns into a true-schwa

– /uh-SAI-ləm/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈsaiː.ləm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

At

At
– For this word,the “A” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/æ[t]//æ[t]/ – Notice also that –

Athens
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/æ-thin-z//ˈæ.θə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a separate syllable –

Athlete
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “th” is un-voiced, the first “e” is long, the second “e” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /æTH-lee[t]/ – /ˈæθ.liː[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable –

Athletes
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “th” is un-voiced, the first “e” is long, and the second “e” disappears

– /æTH-lee-ts/ – /ˈæθ.liː.ts/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable –

Atlanta
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the first “t” is (usually) stopped, the second “a” is also short, and the final “a” is pronounced like the short letter “u”

– /ə[t]-LæN-tuh/ – /ə[t].ˈlæn.tʌ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Atmosphere
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/æ[T]məs-feer/ – /ˈæ[t].məs.fiːɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Atom
– For this word,the “A” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “o” turns into a true-schwa

/æ-dəm//ˈæ.dəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Atrocities
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “o” is short, the “c” is soft, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /uh-CHRAH-sih-deez/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈtʃɹɑ.sɪ.ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Attach
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “t” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the second “a” is short

/uh-TæCH//ə(ʌ)ˈtætʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Attack
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “t” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/uh-TæK//ə(ʌ)ˈtæk/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Attackers
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “t” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/uh--k’rz/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈtæ.kɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Attempt
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “t” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and the “p” is (usually) stopped

/uh-TEHM-[p]-t//ə(ʌ)ˈtɛm.[p].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Attempted
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “t” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, the third “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/uh-TEHM-[p]-tih[d]//ə(ʌ)ˈtɛm.[p].tə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Attend
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “t” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and the final “d” is (usually) stopped

/uh-TEHN-[d]//ə(ʌ).ˈtɛn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Attendee
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “t” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” is short, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/uh-tehn-DEE//ə(ʌ).tɛn.ˈdee/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Attendees
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “t” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” is short, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/uh-tehn-DEEZ//ə(ʌ).tɛn.ˈdeez/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Attended
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “t” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” is short, and since the root-word ends with the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/uh-TEHN-dih[d]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈtɛn.də(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Attention
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “t” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-TEHN-shihn//ə(ʌ)ˈtɛn.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Attentive
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “t” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-TEHN-tihv//ə(ʌ).tɛn.tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Attire
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “t” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/uh-TIGH-‘r//ʌ.ˈtʌiː.ɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Attitude
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is an i-schwa, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /æ-dih-too[d]/ – /ˈæ.ɾɪ.tu[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Attorney
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “t” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)the “o” disappears, and the “ey” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/uh-T’R-nee//ə(ʌ)ˈtɚ.niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Attract
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “tt” combination is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/uh-CHRæ[K]-t//ə(ʌ)ˈtʃɹæ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Attraction
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “tt” combination is pronounced like the single letter “t”(this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-CHRæ[K]-shihn//ə(ʌ)ˈtʃɹæ[k].ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Attractions
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “tt” combination is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after them), the “a” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/uh-CHRæK-shihn-z//ə(ʌ)ˈtʃɹæk.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Attractive
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “tt” combination is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the third “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/uh-CHRæ[K]-dihv//ə(ʌ)ˈtʃɹæ[k].də(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Attribute (noun)
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /æ-chrih-byoo[t]/ – /ˈæ.tʃɹə(ɪ).bju[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Attribute (verb)
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “tt” combination is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /æ-CHRIH-byoo[t]/ – /æ.ˈtʃɹɪ.bju[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Attributed
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “tt” combination  is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” direct after it), the “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and because root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uh-CHRIH-byou-tih[d]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈtʃɹɪ.bju.tə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Attributes (noun)
 – For this word, the “A” is short the “tt” combination is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the “e” is silent

/æ-chrih-byou-ts//ˈæ.tʃɹə(ɪ).bju.ts/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Attrition
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “tt” combination is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-CHRIH-shihn//ə(ʌ).ˈtʃɹɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

A-typical
 – For this word, the “A” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ay-TIH-pih-kəl/ – /eiː.ˈtɪ.pə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Atwood
 – For this name, the “A” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (as in the words “put” or foot”), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/æ[T]-wəih[d]//ˈæ[t].wəɪɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Au

Audience
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long “e”, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AW-dee-ihns//ˈɔ.ɾiː.ə(ɪ)ns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Audiences
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long “e”, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/AW-dee-ihn-sihz//ˈɔ.ɾiː.ə(ɪ)n.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Audio
 – For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “o” is long

/AW-dee-yo//ˈɔ.ɾiː.jo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Audiologist
 – For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “d” is a flap-d, the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/aw-dee-AH-lih-gihs-[t]/ – /ɔ.ɾiː.ˈɑ.lə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Audit
 – For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /AW-dih[t]/ – /ˈɔ.ɾə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Auditor
 – For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /AW-dih-t’r/ – /ˈɔ.ɾə(ɪ).tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Auditors
 – For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /AW-dih-t’r-z/ – /ˈɔ.ɾə(ɪ).tɚ.z/–Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Audits
 – For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like an “aw” combination, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa

/AW-dih-ts/ – /ˈɔ.ɾə(ɪ).ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

August
 – For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “g” is hard, the “u” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is often stopped

/AW-gihs-[t]/ – /ˈɔ.gə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Aunt
– This word has two common pronunciations.  In one:  the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination – in the other: th “Au” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “a”, and in both versions: the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/awn-[t]//ɔn.[t]/ –  Or – /æn-[t]//æn.[t]/ – Notice also that, in both pronunciations, the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Aurora Borealis
 – For this term, in the first word,  the “Au” combination turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is long, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa, – then for the second word, the “o” is long, the “e” is long, the “a” is short, and the “i” is an i-schwa

/uh-ROHR-uh-bohr-ee-æ-lihs//ə(ʌ)ˈɹoɹ.ə(ʌ).boɹ.iː.ˈæ.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress in the first word is on the second syllable, and the stress in the second word is on the third syllable

Australasia
 – For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into a true-schwa, the third “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/aws-chrəl-AY-zhuh//ɔs.t ʃɹəl.ˈeiː.ʒə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Australia
 – For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like an “Aw” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” is short, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

– /aw-SCHRæ-lee-uh/ – /ɔs.ˈtʃɹæ.liː.ə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Australian
 – For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” is short, and for the “-ian” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and
the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/aws-CHRæ-lee-ihnz/ – /ɔs.tʃɹæ.liː.ə(ɪ)nz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Australians
 – For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” is short, and for the “-ian” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and
the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/aws-CHRæ-lee-ihnz/ – /ɔs.tʃɹæ.liː.ə(ɪ)nz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Austria
 – For this country name, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

– /AWS-chtree-uh/ – /ˈɔs.tʃɹiː.ə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Austrian
 – For this country name, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the second “a” turns into an i-schwa

– /AWS-chtree-ihn/ – /ˈɔs.tʃɹiː.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Authentic
 – For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “e” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/aw-THEHN-tihk//ɔ.ˈθɛn.tə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Authenticate
 – For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “e” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/aw-THEHN-tih-kay[t]//ɔ.ˈθɛn.tə(ɪ).ke[iː][t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Author
 – For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “th” is un-voiced, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AW-th’r/ – /ˈɔ.θɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Authoritarian
 – For this word, the “Au” turns into a true-schwa, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa,the second “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ian” suffix – the “i” (converted from the letter “y” of the root-word) is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə-thohr-ih-TAYR-ee-ihn//ˌə.θoɹ.ə(ɪ).ˈteɪɹ.iː. ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable  –

Authoritative
 – For this word, the “Au” turns into a true-schwa, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the third “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə-thohr-ih-TAY-dihv//ˌə.θoɹ.ə(ɪ).ˈte.də(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable  –

Authorization
 – For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “o” disappears, the “i” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/aw-th’r-ai-ZAY-shihn/ – /ˌɔ.θɚ.aiː.ˈzeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

Authorizations
 – For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “o” disappears, the “i” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/aw-th’r-ai-ZAY-shihn-z/ – /ˌɔ.θɚ.aiː.ˈzeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

Authorized
 – For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “th” is un-voiced, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the “e” joins with the “-ed” ending, and the final “d” of the “-ed” ending is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/AW-th’r-aiz-[d]/ – /ˈɔ.θɚ.aiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

Authors
 – For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “th” is un-voiced, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /AW-th’r-z/ – /ˈɔ.θɚ.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable – and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

Authority
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/uh-THOHR-ih-dee//ə(ʌ)ˈθoɹ.ə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Autocratic
 – For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, the “o” is long, the “c” is hard, the second “a” is short, the second “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c”is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/aw-doh-KRæ-dih[k]//ˌɔ.ɾo.ˈkɹæ.ɾə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Automatic
 – For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like in the “Aw” combination, the “t” is a flap-d, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is short, the second “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /aw-də--dihk/ – /ɔ.ɾə(ʌ).ˈmæ.ɾə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Automatically
 – For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like in the “Aw” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is short, the second “t” is a flap-t, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /aw-də--dihk-lee/ – /ɔ.ɾə(ʌ).ˈmæ.ɾə(ɪ)k.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Autonomous
 – For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa

/aw-TAH-nih-mihs/ – /ɔ.ˈtɑ.nə(ɪ).mə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Autonomy
 – For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/aw-TAH-nə-mee/ – /ɔ.ˈtɑ.nə.miː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Autopilot
 – For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, the first “o” is long, the “i” is long, the second “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/AW-doh-pai-lih[t]//ˈɔ.ɾo.paiː.lə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Autumn
 – For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, the “u” is a u-schwa, and the final “n” is silent

– /AW-duhm//ˈɔ.ɾə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Auxiliary
– For this word, the “Au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/awg-ZIH-lee-ary//ɔtg.ˈzɪ.liː.eɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Av

Available
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “ai” combination is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to another), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-VAYL-uh-bəl/ – /ʌ.ˈveɪ.lə.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Avant-Garde
 – For this term, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the second “a” is pronounced like a short letter “o”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “G” is hard, the third “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/ah-vahn[t]-GAHR-[d]/ – /ɑ.vɑn[t]-ˈgɑɹ[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Avatar
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the last “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

– /AH-vuh-tahr/ – /ˈɑ.və(ʌ).tɑɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Avenue
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ue” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”

– /æ-vih-noo/ – /ˈæ.və(ɪ).nu / – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Avenues
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “ue” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

– /æ-vih-nooz/ – /ˈæ.və(ɪ).nuz / – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Average
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “e” disappears, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æV-rihdʒ/ – /ˈæv.ɹə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Aviation
 – For this word, the “A” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ay-vee-YAY-shihn//ˌeiː.viː.jeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Avocado
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “o” is long

– /ah-və-KAH-doh/ – /ɑ.və.ˈkɑ.ɾo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Avoid
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uh-VOY-[d]//ə(ʌ).ˈvoiː.[d]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as third syllable

Aw

Awake
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “k” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/uh-WAY[K]/ /ə(ʌ)ˈweiː[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Award
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is pronounced like the long letter “o”, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/uh-WOHR-[d]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈwoɹ.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the final “d” (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Awards
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is pronounced like the long letter “o”, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/uh-WOHR-dz/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈwoɹ.dz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “dz” ending acts as a third syllable

Aware
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/uh-WAYR//ə(ʌ)ˈweɪɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Awareness (Aware-ness)
– For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “e” is silent, and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə-WAYR-nihs/ – /ə.ˈweɪɹ.nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Away
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, and the “ay” combination is pronounce like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/uh-WAY//ə(ʌ)ˈweiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Awful (Awe-full)
– For this word, the “Aw” combination is pronounced like in the word “law” or “paw” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AW-fəl//ˈɔ.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Awfully (Awe-full-ly)
– For this word, the “Aw” combination is pronounced like in the word “law” or “paw” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-fully” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AW-fə-lee//ˈɔ.fə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Awkward
– For this word, the “Aw” combination is pronounced like in the word “law” or “paw” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “k” is almost stopped, the second “a” disappears, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/AWK-w’r-[d]//ˈɔk.wɚ.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Awry
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “w” is silent, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/uh-RAI//ə(ʌ).ɹaiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Ax

 

Ay

 

Az

 

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– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter A ) –


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