– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter A ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.


Aa

 

Ab . Ac . Ad . Ae . Af . Ag . Ah . Ai . Aj . Ak . Al . Am
An – Az

 

A
 – The name of the letter “A” is pronounced as the sound of the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

– /ay/ – /eiː/ –

 

Ab

Abandon
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is short, the “o” turns into an i-schwa 

/uh-BæN-dihn/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈbæn.də(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Abandoned
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is short, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/uh-BæN-dihn-d/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈbæn.də(ɪ)n.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

Abbreviation
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “bb” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “b” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” is a True Long “A”, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-bree-vee-AY-shihn/ – /ə(ʌ).bɹiː.viː.ˈe.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the major stress is on the fourth syllable and that there is a minor stress on the second syllable –

Abbreviations
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “bb” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “b” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” is a True Long “A”, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/uh-bree-vee-AY-shihn-z/ – /ə(ʌ).bɹiː.viː.ˈe.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the major stress is on the fourth syllable, that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a separate syllable –

Abdomen
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “b” is almost stopped, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ[B]-dih-mihn//ˈæ[b].də(ɪ).mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Abdominal
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “b” is almost stopped, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə[b]-DAH-mih-nəl//ə[b].ˈdɑ.mə(ɪ).nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Ability
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-BIH-lih-dee/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈbɪ.lə.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Able
 – For this word, the “A” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/AY-bəl//ˈeiː.bəl/ – Notice also thatthe stress is on the first syllable –

Abnormal (ab-Normal)
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “b” is (usually) stopped, the “o” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ[b]-NOHR-məl/ – /æ[b].ˈnoɹ.məl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Abort
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/uh-BOHR[T]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈboɹ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Abortion
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-BOHR-shihn/ –/ə(ʌ).ˈboɹ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

About
 – For this word, the “A” turns into the u-schwa, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /uh-BOW[T]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈbau[t]/  – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Above
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the final “e” is silent

/uh-BUHV/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈbə(ʌ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Abreast (A’breast)
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/uh-BREHS-[t]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈbɹɛs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Abroad (A’broad)
– For this word, the “A” turns into u-schwa, the “oa” is pronounced like the “aw” combination(this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but (often) stopped

– /uh-BRAW[D]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈbɹɔ[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Absence
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “b” is (sometimes) stopped, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ[B]-sihn-s/ – /ˈæb.sə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Absent
 – For this word, The “A” is short, the “b” is (almost) stopped, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ[B]-sihn[t]/ – /ˈæ[b].sə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Absenteeism
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “b” is (almost) stopped, for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is
(often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”(this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æb-sihn-TEE-ih-zəm//æb.sə(ɪ)n.tiː.ə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Absolute
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “b” is (almost) stopped, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/æb-sə-LOO[T]/ – /æb.sə.ˈlu[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Absolutely
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “b” is (almost) stopped, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/æb-sə-LOO[T]-lee/ – /æb.sə.ˈlu[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Absorb
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “b” is (usually) stopped, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “o” is long, and the final “b” is (often) stopped

/uh[b]-ZOHR[B]/ – /ə(ʌ)[b].ˈzoɹ[b]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Absurd
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” disappears, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /əb-S’R[D]//əb.ˈsəɹ[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Abundance
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “u” is short, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-BUHN-dihn-s/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈbʌn.də(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Abuse
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the final “e” is silent

/uh-BYOUS//ə(ʌ).ˈbjus/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Abusive
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə-BYOO-sihv//ə.ˈbju.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Ac

Academic
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æ-kuh-DEH-mi[k]/ – /æ.kə(ʌ).ˈdɛ.mə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Academy
 – For this word, the “A” turns into the u-schwa, the “c” is hard, the second “a” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “e” turns into the true-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /uh-KæD-ə-mee/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈkæ.ɾə.miː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Acceleration
 – For this word, the “A” turns into an i-schwa, the first “c” is soft, the second “c” is soft, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-seh-l’r-AY-shihn//ə(ɪ)k.ˌsɛ.lɚ.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Accent
 – For this word, the “A” is short, for the “cc” combination – the first “c” is hard, the second “c” is soft (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æK-sehn[t]/ – /ˈæk.sɛn[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Accept
 – For this word, the “A” turns into the true-schwa, for the “cc” combination –  the first “c” is hard, the second “c” is soft (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the “p” is (almost) stopped, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /ək-SEH[P][T]/ – /əkˈsɛ[p][t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Acceptable (Acceptable)
– For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, for the “cc” combination – the first “c” is hard, the second “c” is soft (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to another), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ək-SEH[P]-duh-bəl/ – /ək.ˈsɛ[p].də(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Accepted
 – For this word, the “A” turns into an true-schwa, for the “cc” combination – the first “c” is hard, the second “c” is soft (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ək-SEH[P]-dih[d]/ – /ək.ˈsɛ[p].də(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Access
 – For this word, the “A” is short,for the “cc” combination – the first “c” is hard, the second “c” is soft (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æK-sehs/ – /ˈæk.sɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Accessibility (Access-ability)
– For this word, the “A” is short,for the “cc” combination – the first “c” is hard, the second “c” is soft (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, the third “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/æk-seh-sih-BIH-lih-dee/ – /ˌæk.sɛs.sə(ɪ).ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Accessible (Access-able)
– For this word, the “A” turns into an i-schwa, for the “cc” combination – the first “c” is hard, the second “c” is soft (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ible” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihK-SEH-sih-bəl/ – /ə(ɪ)k.ˈsɛ.sə(ɪ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Accessories
 – For this word, the “A” turns into an i-schwa, for the “cc” combination – the first “c” is hard, the second “c” is soft (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “o” disappears, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost, like the letter “s”

/ihk-SEH-s’r-eez//ə(ɪ)kˈsɛ.sɚ.iːz / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Accident
 – For this word, the “A” is short, for the “cc” combination – the first “c” is hard, the second “c” is soft (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “e” is short, and the “t” is (often) stopped

– /æK-sih-dehn-[t]/ – /ˈæk.sə(ɪ).ˈdɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Accidental
 – For this word, the “A” is short, for the “cc” combination – the first “c” is hard, the second “c” is soft (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “e” is short, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æk-sih-DEHN-təl/ – /æk.sə(ɪ).ˈdɛn.təl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Accidentally
 – For this word, the “A” is short, for the “cc” combination – the first “c” is hard, the second “c” is soft (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “e” is short, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æk-sih-DEHN[T]-ʔlee/ – /æk.sə(ɪ).ˈdɛn.[t].ʔliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Acclimated
 – For this word the “A” is short, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is an i-schwa, , for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped but with the addition of the “-ed” ending – the “t” is a flap-t, and the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” (even if it’s stopped) – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /æK-lih-may-dih[d]/ – /ˈæk.lə(ɪ).meiː.ɾ(ɪ)[ɾ]/– Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Accommodated
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “o” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t”, the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uh-KAH-muh-day-dihd/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈkɑ.mə(ʌ).deiː.ɾə(ɪ)ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Accommodation
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “o” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” turns into an i-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-kah-mih-DAY-shihn/ – /ə(ʌ).ˌkɑ.mə(ɪ).ˈdeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

Accommodations
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “o” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” turns into an i-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/uh-kah-mih-DAY-shihn/ – /ə(ʌ).ˌkɑ.mə(ɪ).ˈdeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

Accompany
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/uh-KUHM-pih-nee/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈkʌm.pə(ɪ).niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Accomplice
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is short, and for the “-ice” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final
“e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-KAHM-plihs//ə(ʌ).ˈkɑm.plə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Accomplish
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is short, for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-KAHM-plihsh/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈkɑm.plə(ɪ)ʃ./ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Accomplished
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is short, for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-
voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the “sh” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/uh-KAHM-plihsh-t/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈkɑm.plə(ɪ)ʃ.t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Accomplishments
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is short, for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-
voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/uh-KAHM-plihsh-mihn-ts/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈkɑm.plə(ɪ)sh.mə(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable, and that the “ts” ending acts as a fifth syllable

According
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-KOHR-ding/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈkoɹ.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Account
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/uh-KOWN-[t]//ə(ʌ).ˈkaun.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Accountability (Account-ability)
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ou” combination is pronounced like an “ow” combination, and for the “-ability” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-cown-tuh-BIH-lih-dee/ – /ə(ʌ).ˌkaun.tə(ʌ).ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/– Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable, that the major stress is on the fourth syllable, and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Accountant
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ou” combination is pronounced like an “ow” combination, the first “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-KOWN[T]-ihn-[t]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈkaun[t].ə(ɪ)n.[t]/– Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Accounting
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “‘ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə-KOWN-ting//ə.ˈkɑun.tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Accounts
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ou” combination is pronounced like an “ow” combination

– /uh-KOWN-ts/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈkaun.ts/– Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

Accuracy
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “a” is turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-acy” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æK-you-rih-see//ˈæk.juɹ.ə(ɪ).siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Accurate
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æK-y’r-ih[t]/ – /ˈæk.jɚ.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Accurately
 – For this word, “A” is short, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ately” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, the “e” is silent, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ-kyou-rih[t]-lee/ – /ˈæ.kju.rə(ɪ)[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Accuse
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/uh-KYOOZ/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈkjuz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Accustomed
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the letter “m” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/ə-KUHS-tuhm-d//ə.ˈkʌs.tə(ʌ)m.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Ache
– For this word, the “A” is a True Long “A”, the “ch” combination is pronounced like the single hard letter “c”, and the final “e” is silent

/ay-k//e.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a separate syllable

Achieve
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

– /uh-CHEEV//ə(ʌ).ˈtʃiːv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Achieved
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “v”– the “e” of te “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

/uh-CHEEV-[d]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈtʃiːv.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Achievement
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is silent, and for the “ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /uh-CHEEV-mihn-[t]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈtʃiːv.mə(ʌ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Achievements
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is silent, and for the “ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-CHEEV-mihn-ts/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈtʃiːv.mə(ʌ)n.ts/ – Notice also that that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Achieving
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-CHEEV-ing//ə(ʌ).ˈtʃiːv.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Aching
 – For this word, the “A” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ay-king//ˈeiː.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Acid
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /æ-sih[d]//ˈæ.sə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Acknowledge
 – For this word, the “A” turns into an i-schwa, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” but is (often) stopped, the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “o”, the “e” turns into the i-schwa, the “dg” combination is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

– /ih[g]-NAH-lihdʒ/ – /ə(ɪ)[g].ˈnɑ.lə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Acquaintance
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is silent, the “qu” is pronounced like a “kw” combination, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” becomes a glottal stop, for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-KWAYN-ihn-s//ə(ʌ).ˈkweiːn.ʔə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Acquaintances
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is silent, the “qu” is pronounced like a “kw” combination, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” becomes a glottal stop, for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /uh-KWAYN-‘ihn-sihz//ə(ʌ).ˈkweiːn.ʔə(ɪ)n.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Acquainted
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is silent, the “qu” is pronounced like a “kw” combination, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /uh-KWAYN-tih[d]//ə(ʌ).ˈkweiːn.tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Acquire
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is silent, the “qu” combination is pronounced like a “kw” combination, and for the “-ire” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-KWIGH-y’r/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈkwʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Acquired
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is silent, the “qu” combination is pronounced like a “kw” combination, and for the “-ire” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-KWIGH-y’r-[d]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈkwʌiː.jɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Acquiring
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is silent, the “qu” combination is pronounced like a “kw” combination,, and for the “-ire” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next) – (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-KWIGH-yr-ing/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈkwʌiː.jɚŋ/ — Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Acquisition
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is silent, the “qu” combination sounds like a “kw” combination, the first “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æ-kwih-ZIH-shihn/ – /æ.kwə(ɪ).ˈzɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Acquisitions
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is silent, the “qu” combination is pronounced like a “kw” combination, the first “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “i” is short, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /æ-kwih-ZIH-shihn-z/ – /æ.kwə(ɪ).ˈzɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

Acronym
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into the u-schwa, and the “y” turns into an i-schwa

– /æK-ruh-nihm/ – /ˈæk.ɹə(ʌ).nə(ɪ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Acronyms
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into the u-schwa, the “y” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /æK-ruh-nihm-z/ – /ˈæk.ɹə(ʌ).nə(ɪ)m.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Across
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/uh-KRAWS/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈkɹɔs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Act
 – For this word, the “A” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped

/æ[k]t/ – /æ[k]t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable –

Action
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æK-shihn/ – /ˈæk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Actions
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/æK-shihn-z/ – /ˈæk.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

Activate
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æK-dih-vay[t]/ – /ˈæk.də(ɪ).ve[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Active
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æK-dihv/ – /ˈæk.də(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Actively
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard, the “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/æK-dihv-lee//ˈæk.də(ɪ)v.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Activists
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard, the first “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ist” suffix –  the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æK-dih-vihs-ts/ – /ˈæk.də(ɪ).və(ɪ)s.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Activities
 – For this word, the “A” should be short, the “c” is hard, the first “i” is short, the second “i” turns into an i-schwa, the second “t” (usually) turns into the flap-d, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /æk-TIH-vih-deez/ – /æk.ˈtɪ.və(ɪ).ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Activity
 – For this word, the “A” should be short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æk-TIH-vih-dee/ – /æk.ˈtɪ.və(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Actor
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æ[K]-d’r/ – /ˈæ[k].dɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Actors
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /æ[K]-d’r-z/ – /ˈæ[k].dɚ.z/ – Notice also the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z’ ending acts as a third syllable –

Actress
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æ[K]-chrihs/ – /ˈæ[k].tʃɹə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Actresses
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “e” of the “-es” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /æ[K]-chrihs-ihz/ – /ˈæ[k].tʃɹə(ɪ).sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Actual
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æK-choo-əl/ – /ˈæk.tʃu.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Actually
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped,the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æK-chuh-lee/ – /ˈæk.tʃə(ʌ).liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Actuary
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æK-choo-ayr-ee//ˈæk.tʃu.eɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Ad

Ad
 – For this word, the “A” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/æ[d]/ – /æ[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Adage
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ-dihdʒ/ – /ˈæ.ɾə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Adapt
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is short, and the “p” is (usually) stopped

– /uh-[P]-t/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈdæ[p].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Add
 – For this word, the “A” is short, and the “dd” combination turns into a single flap-d but is often stopped

/æ[d]/ – /æ[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Addicted
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “dd” combination is pronounced like the single letter “d” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uh-DIH[K]-dih[d]//ə(ʌ).ˈdɪ[k].də(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Adding
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “dd” combination is pronounced like the single flap-d (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ-ding//ˈæ.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Addition
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “dd” combination is pronounced simply as the single letter “d” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-DIH-shihn//ə(ʌ).ˈdɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Additionally
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “dd” combination is pronounced simply as the single letter “d” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is short, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-DIH-shihn-ə-lee//ə(ʌ).ˈdɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.ə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Address (noun)
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “dd” combination is pronounced like the soft “g”, and for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æ-dʒrehs//ˈæ.dʒɹɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Address (verb)
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “dd” combination is pronounced like the soft “g”, and for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-dʒREHS/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈdʒɹɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Addressed
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “dd” combination is pronounced like the soft “g”, for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – th “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

– /uh-dʒREH-st/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈdʒɹɛ.st/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a third syllable

Adept (adjective)
– For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, and the “p” is (usually) stopped

/ə-DEH[P]-t/ – /ə.ˈdɛ[p].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Adept (noun)
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “e” is short, and the “p” is (usually) stopped

/æ-deh[p]-t/ – /ˈæ.dɛ[p].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable –

Adequate
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination, and for the “-ate” suffix –the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ-dih-kwih[t]/ – /ˈæ.ɾə(ɪ).kwə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Adhere
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the first “e” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/æd-HEER//æɾ.ˈhiːɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Adipose
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

– /æ-dih-pohz/ – /ˈæɾ.ə(ɪ).poz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Adjective
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is almost stopped, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the first “e” is short, the “c” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ[D]-dʒeh[k]-tihv//ˈæ[d].dʒɛ[k].tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Adjust
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “d” is stopped, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “u” is short, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/uh-dʒUH-s[t]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈdʒʌ.s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “st” (even when the “t” is stopped) ending acts as a third syllable –

Adjustments
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “d” is stopped, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “u” is short, the first “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-dʒUHS-[t]-mihn-ts/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈdʒʌs.[t].mə(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable –

Administer
 – For this word, the “A” turns into an i-schwa, the “d” is (often) stopped, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ih[d]-MIH-nih-st’r/ – /ə(ɪ)[d].ˈmɪ.nə(ɪ).stɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Administered
 – For this word, the “A” turns into an i-schwa, the “d” is (often) stopped, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-er” suffix – the first “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this
suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ih[d]-MIH-nih-st’r[d]/ – /ə(ɪ)[d].ˈmɪ.nə(ɪ).stɚ[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Administration
 – For this word, the “A” turns into an i-schwa, the “d” is is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ih[d]-mih-nihs-CHRAY-shihn/ – /ə(ɪ)[ɾ].ˌmɪ.nə(ɪ)s.ˈtʃɹeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Administrative
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa the “d” is (usually) stopped, the first “i” is short, the second “i” turns into an i-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the second “t” (usually) turns into a flap-d, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə[d]-MIH-nihs-chray-dihv//ə[d].ˈmɪ.nə(ɪ)s.tʃɹeiː.ɾə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Admirable (Admire-able)
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the “i” disappears, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to another), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æ[ɾ]-m’r-uh-bəl/ – /ˈæ[ɾ].məɹ.ə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Admiration
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the “i” disappears, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ[d]-m’r-AY-shihn//ˌæ[ɾ].mɚ.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and the major stress is on the third syllable

Admire
 – For this word, the “A” turns into an true-schwa, the “d” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ire” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə[d]-MIGH-yr//ə[d].ˈmʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Admirer
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), there is an additional phantom letter “r” in-between the first “r” and the “e” (this is a product of two of the same sound right next to each other), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə[d]-MIGH-y’r-rər-z//ə[d].mʌiː.jɚ.ɹɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable

Admirers
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), there is an additional phantom letter “r” in-between the first “r” and the “e” (this is a product of two of the same sound right next to each other), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə[d]-MIGH-y’r-rər-z//ə[d].mʌiː.jɚ.ɹɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable

Admit
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ə[d]-MIH[T]/ – /ə[ɾ].ˈmɪ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Admits
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is (usually) stopped, and the “i” is short

– /ə[d]-MIH-ts/ – /ə[d].ˈmɪ.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

Admitting
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the first “i” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə[d]-MIH-ding/ – /ə[ɾ].ˈmɪ.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Adolescence
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “e” is short, the “sc” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s”, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ-də-LEH-sihns/ – /ˌæ.ɾə.ˈlɛ.sə(ɪ)ns/ – Notice also that the major stress is on the third syllable and that there is a minor stress is on the first syllable –

Adopt
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped

/uh-DAH[P]-t/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈdɑ[p].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Adopted
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped, the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uh-DAH[P]-tih[d]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈdɑ[p].tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Adrenaline
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” is short, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is short, and the final “e” is silent

/uh-dʒREH-nuh-lihn//ə(ʌ).ˈdʒɹɛ.nə(ʌ).lɪn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Adult
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “u” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/uh-DUHL-[t]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈdʌl.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Adults
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, and the “u” is short

– /uh-DUHL-ts/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈdʌl.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable –

Advance
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, the second “a” is short, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /ə[d]-VæNS/ – /ə[ɾ].ˈvæns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Advanced
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” isa flap-d but is (often) stopped, the second “a” is short, the “c” is soft, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

– /ə[d]-VæN-st/ – /ə[ɾ].ˈvæn.st/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a third syllable

Advancement
 – For this word, the “A” turns into an true-schwa, the “d” is (usually) stopped, the second “a” is short, the “c” is soft, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə[d]-VæNS-mihn-[t]/ – /ə[d].ˈvæns.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Advantage
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is (often) stopped, the second “a” is short, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /əd-VæN-tihdʒ/ – /əd.ˈvæn.tə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Advantages
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-scwa, the “d” is (usually) stopped, the second “a” is short, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/əd-VæN-tih-dʒihz/ – /əd.ˈvæn.tə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Adventure
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, the “e” is short, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə[d]-VEHN-ch’r/ – /ə[ɾ].ˈvɛn.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Adventuring
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is (usually) stopped, the “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə[d]-VEHN-ch’ring//ə[d].vɛn.tʃɚ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Adventurous
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is (usually) stopped, the “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə[d]-VEHN-ch’r-ihs//ə[d].vɛn.tʃɚ.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Adverb
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is almost stopped, the “e” disappears, and the final “b” is (usually) stopped

/æ[D]-v'[b]//ˈæ[d].vɚ[b]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Adversary
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is (often) stopped, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ[D]-v’r-sayr-ee/ – /ˈæ[d].vɚ.seɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Adverse
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is (often) stopped, the “e” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/æ[d]-V’R-s//æ[d]ˈvɚs / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Advert
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is (usually) stopped, the “e” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/æ[D]-v’r-[t]//ˈæ[d].vɚ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Advertise
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is (often) stopped, the “e” disappears, the first “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

– /æ[D]-v’r-taiz/ – /ˈæ[d].vɚ.taiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Advertisement
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is (often) stopped, the “e” disappears, the first “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /æ[D]-v’r-taiz-mihn[t]/ – /ˈæ[d].vɚ.taiːz.mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

Advertising
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is (often) stopped, the “e” disappears, the first “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue

– /æD-v’r-tai-zing/ – /ˈæ[d].vɚ.taiː.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Advice
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ice” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə[d]-VIGHS//ə[ɾ].ˈvʌiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Advise
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/ə[d]-VAIZ/ – /ə[d].ˈvaiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Adviser
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə[d]-VAI-z’r/ – /ə[d].ˈvaiː.zɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Advisor
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə[d]-VAI-z’r/ – /ə[d].ˈvaiː.zɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Advocates
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “d” is a flap-d (often) stopped, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ[D]-və-kih-ts//ˈæ[ɾ].və.kə(ɪ).ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that  –

Ae

 

Af

Affair
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the a “Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it) – (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/uh-FAYR/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈfeɪɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Affect
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/uh-FEH[K]-t/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈfɛ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Affection
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-FEHK-shihn/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈfɛk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Affiliation
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a’ is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-fih-lee-AY-shihn/ – /ə(ʌ).ˌfɪ.liː.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Afford
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/uh-FOHR-[d]//ə(ʌ).ˈfoɹ.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

Affordable (Afford-able)
– For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply as the single letter “f”, the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to another), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə-FOHR-duh-bəl//ə.ˈfoɹ.də(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Afraid
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uh-FRAY[D]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈfɹeiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable –

Africa
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

– /æ-frih-kuh/ – /ˈæ.fɹə(ɪ).kə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

African
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and the second “a” turns into an i-schwa

– /æ-frih-kihn/ – /ˈæ.fɹə(ɪ).kə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Africans
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /æ-frih-kihn-z/ – /ˈæ.fɹə(ɪ).kə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

After
 – For this word, the “A” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æF-t’r//ˈæf.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Afternoon
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “e” disappears, and the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/æf-t’r-NOON//ˌæf.tɚˈnun/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable  –

Afterwards
 – For this word, the “A” is short, and the “e” disappears, the second “a” disappears, the “d” is (often) stopped, and the final “z” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/æF-t’r-w’r[d]-z//ˈæf.tɚ.wɚ[d].z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “dz” ending (even when the “d” is stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Ag

Again
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is hard, and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the short letter “e”

/uh-GEHN//ə(ʌ).ˈgɛn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Against
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is hard, and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the short letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/uh-GEHN-s[t]//ə(ʌ).ˈgɛn.s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “st” (even when the “t” is not stopped) ending acts as a third syllable

Age
 – For this word, the “A” is a True Long “A”, the “g” is short, and the final “e” is silent

/ay-dʒ//e.dʒ/

Aged (adjective)
– For this word, the “A” is a True Long “A”, the “g” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/AY-dʒih[d]//ˈe.dʒə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Aged (verb)
– For this word, the “A” is a True Long “A”, the “g” is soft, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the soft letter “g” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/ay-dʒ-[d]//e.dʒ.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Agencies
 – For this word, the “A” is a True Long “A”, the “g” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/AY-dʒihn-seez//ˈe.dʒə(ɪ)n.siːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Agency
 – For this word, the “A” is a True Long “A”, the “g” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/AY-dʒihn-see//ˈe.dʒə(ɪ)n.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Agenda
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is soft, the “e” is short, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/uh-dʒEHN-duh//ə(ʌ).ˈdʒɛm.də(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Agent
 – For this word, the “A” is a True Long “A”, the “g” is soft, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is
(often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AY-dʒihn-[t]//ˈe.dʒə(ɪ).[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Agents
 – For this word, the “A” is a True Long “A”, the “g” is soft, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is
(often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /AY-dʒə(ɪ)n-ts/ – /ˈe.dʒə(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

Ages
 – For this word, the “A” is a True Long “A”, the “g” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

– /AY-dʒə(ɪ)z/ – /ˈe.dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Aggression
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a true-schwa, the “gg” combination is pronounced like the single hard letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and the first “s” merges with the “-sion” suffix, and for the “-ssion” suffix – the “ssi” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə-GREH-shihn//ə.ˈgɹɛ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Aggressive
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-GREH-sihv//ə(ʌ)ˈgɹɛ.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Aging
 – For this word, the “A” is a True Long “A”, the first “g” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AY-dʒing//ˈe.dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ago
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is hard, and the final “o” is long

/uh-go//ə(ʌ).go/ – Notice also that this word, though having two syllables, does not have a discernible word-stress  –

Agree
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is hard, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/uh-GREE//ə(ʌ)ˈgɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Agreeable (Agree-able)
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to another), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-GREE-ub-bəl/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈɡriː.ə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Agreement
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-GREE-mihn[t]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈɡɹiː.mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Agriculture
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “g” is hard, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the first “u” is a u-schwa, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ-grih-cuhl-ch’r//ˈæ.gɹə(ɪ).kə(ʌ)l.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Ah

Ahead (A’head)
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, and the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /uh-HEH-[d]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈhɛ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Ai

Aid
 – For this word, the “Ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ay-[d]//eiː.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

Aim
 – For this word, the “Ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/aym//eiːm/

Aimed
 – For this word, the “Ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root word ends with the letter “m” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/aym-d//eiːm.d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

Air
 – For this word, the “Ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it) – (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ayr//eɪɹ/

Airbus
 – For this word, the “Ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it) – (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “u” is short

– /AYR-buhs/ – /ˈeɪɹ.bʌs/ –

Aircraft
 – For this word, the “Ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it) – (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/AYR-kræf-[t]//ˈeɪɹ.kɹæf.[t]/ Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable  –

Airport
 – For this word, the “Ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it) – (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/AYR-pohr[t]//ˈeɪɹ.poɹ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Aisle
 – For this word, the “Ai” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i”, the “s” is silent, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the sound of the “s” and the “l” (this is the product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

– /AI-yl/ – /ˈaiː.jl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable (This word sounds exactly like the contracted version of “I Will”:  I’ll) –

 

Aj

 

Ak

 

Al

Alarm
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, and the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/uh-LAHRM//ə(ʌ).ˈlɑɹm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Alarmed
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “m” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/uh-LAHRM-d//ə(ʌ).ˈlɑɹm.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

Alarming
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, and the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-LAHR-ming//ə(ʌ).ˈlɑɹ.mɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Alejandra
 – For this name, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “e” is pronounce like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “j” is pronounced like the letter “h”, the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/ah-lay-HAHN-dʒruh//ɑ.leiː.ˈhɑn.dʒɹə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Albeit
 – For this ridiculous pseudo-word, the the “A” is short, the “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “e” and the “i” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/æl-BEE-yih[t]//æl.ˈbiː.jə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Albums
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /æL-buhm-z/ – /ˈæl.bə(ʌ)m.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Alcohol
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “c” is hard, the first “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, and the second “o” is short

/AHL-koh-hahl//ˈɑl.ko.hɑl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Alive
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/uh-LAIV//ə(ʌ)ˈlaiːv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Align
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is long, and the “g” is silent

/uh-LAIN//ə(ʌ).ˈlaiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Aligned
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is long, the “g” is silent, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/uh-LAIN//ə(ʌ).ˈlaiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Alkaloids
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/æL-kuh-loyd-z//ˈæl.kə(ʌ).loiːd.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

All
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/awl//ɔl/

Allegory
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “o” is long, and the final letter “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/æ-lə-gohr-ee//ˈæ.lə.goɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Allergic
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” disappears, the “g” is soft, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-L’R-dʒihk/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈlɚ.dʒə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Allergies
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” disappears, the “g” is soft, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/æ-l’r-dʒeez//ˈæ.lɚ.dʒiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Allegations
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, the second “a” is a Long ‘A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/æ-lih-GAY-shihn-z/ – /æl.ə(ɪ).ˈgeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “z” ending acts like a fifth syllable –

Alleviate
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-LEE-vee-yay[t]//ˈe[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Alliance
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ll” is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-LAI-ihn-s/ – /(əʌ).ˈlaiː.(əɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Allied
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, and since the root-word ends with the letter “y” (converted to an “i” for the addition of the suffix) – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

/æ-lai[d]//ˈæ.laiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Allies
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, the “e” of the “-es” ending is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/æ-laiz/ – /ˈæ.laiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Allocate
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ-loh-kay[t]//ˈæ.lo.ke[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Allocated
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “c” is hard, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped but with the addition of the “-ed” ending – the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is pronounced like an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /æ-loh-kay-dih[d]/ – /ˈæl.o.ke.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

Allocating
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “c” is hard, the second “a” is Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æ-loh-kay-ding//ˈæl.o.keiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Allow
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “now” or “how” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-LOW/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈlau/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Allowance
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounce simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “now” or “how” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-LOW-ihn-s//ə(ʌ).ˈlau.ə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Allowed
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “now” or “how” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root word ends with the sound of the  “ow” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /uh-LOW[D]/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈlau[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Ally
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/æ-lai//ˈæ.laiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Almost
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/AHL-mohs-[t]//ˈɑl.mos.[t]/ –  –Or…
/ahl-MOHS-[t]//ɑl.ˈmos.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress for this word can be on either syllable  –

Alone
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/uh-LOHN//ə(ʌ)ˈlon/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Along
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “wing” or “fang” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/uh-LAWNG//ə(ʌ)ˈlɔŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Alongside (along-Side)
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “wing” or “fang” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/uh-lawngSAI-[d]//ə(ʌ)ˌlɔŋˈsaiː.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllablethe major stress is on the third syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Aloud (a’Loud)
– For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the “d” ending is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uh-LOW-[d]//ə(ʌ)ˈlau.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Alphabet
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/æL-fuh-beh-[t]//ˈæl.fə(ʌ).bɛ.t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Alphabetical
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æl-fuh-BEH-dih-kəl//ˌæl.fə(ʌ).ˈbɛ.ɾə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Alphabetically
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ally” suffix – the “a” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/æl-fuh-BEH-dih-klee//ˌæl.fə(ʌ).ˈbɛ.ɾə(ɪ).kliː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Already
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/awl-REH-dee//ɔlˈrɛ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Also
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “o” is long

/AWL-so//ˈɔl.so/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Alter
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AWL-t’r//ˈɔl.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Alternate (adjective)
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /AWL-t’r-nih[t]/ – /ˈɔl.tɚ.nə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Alternate (verb)
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /AWL-t’r-nay[t]/ – /ˈɔl.tɚ.ne[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Alternative
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /awl-T’R-nuh-dihv/ – /ˈɔl.tɚ.nə.ɾ(əɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Alternatives
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /awl-T’R-nuh-dihv-z/ – /ˈɔl.tɚ.nə.ɾ(əɪ)v.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

Alternatively
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/awl-T’R-nuh-dihv-lee//ˈɔl.tɚ.nə.ɾ(əɪ)v.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Although
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “th” is voiced, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the long letter “o”, and the “gh” is silent

– /awl-THOH/ – /ɔl.ˈðo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Altogether (All-together)
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the first “e” is short, the “th” combination is voiced, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/awl-tə-GEH-th’r//ɔl.tə.ˈgɛ.ðɚ/ – Notice also that there is a stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Altruist (All-true-ist)
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AWL-chroo-is[t]//ˈɔl.tʃɹu.ə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Altruistic (All-true-ist-ic)
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “Aw” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is long, for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/awl-chroo-IHS.tih[k]//ɔl.tʃɹu.ˈə(ɪ)s.tə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Always (All-ways)
– For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/AWL-ways//ˈɔl.weiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Am

Amadeus
– For this name, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the second “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “u” turns into an i-schwa

/ah-mə-DAY-ihs//ɑ.mə.ˈdeiː.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Amaze
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/uh-MAYZ//ə(ʌ)ˈmeiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Amazed
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z”– the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/uh-MAYZ-[d]//ə(ʌ)ˈmeiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

Amazing
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-MAY-zing/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈmeiː.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Amazon
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the “o” is short

/æ-muh-zahn/ – /ˈæ.mə(ʌ).zɑn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Ambiance
 – For this word, the “A” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AHM-bee-ihns/ – /ˈɑm.biː.ə(ɪ)ns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Ambiguity
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æm-bih-GYOU-ih-dee//æm.bɪ.ˈgju.ɪ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Ambiguous
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “i” is short, the “g” is hard, the first “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æm-BIH-gyoo-ihs//æm.ˈbɪ.gju.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Ambition
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the first “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æm-BIH-shihn//æmˈbɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Ambitious
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the first “i” is short, and for the “-tious” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æm-BIH-shihs//æm.ˈbɪ.ʃə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Ambled
 – For this word, the “A” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/æM-bəl-[d]//ˈæm.bəl.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ambulance
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æM-byoo-lihn-s//ˈæm.bju.lə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Amenities
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/uh-MEH-nih-deez//ə(ʌ).ˈmɛ.nə(ɪ).ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

America
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and the final “a” also turns into a u-schwa

– /uh-MAYR-ih-kuh/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈmeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)kə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

American
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwathe “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and the second “a” turns into an i-schwa

/uh-MAYR-ih-kihn/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈmeɪɹ.ə(ɪ).kə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Americans
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwathe “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/uh-MAYR-ih-kihn-z/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈmeɪɹ.ə(ɪ).kə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

Amnesty
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /æM-nihs-tee/ – /ˈæm.nə(ɪ)s.tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Among
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “wing” or “fang” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /uh-MUHNG/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈmʌŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Amongst
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, and the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”

/uh-MUHNG-st//ə(ʌ).ˈmʌŋ.st/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a third syllable

A-Moral
 – For this word, the “A” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “o” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AYMOHR-əl//ˈeiː.ˈmoɹ.əl/ – Notice also that there is an equal stress on both the first and the second syllable

Amount
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/uh-MOWN-[t]//ə(ʌ)ˈmaun.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Amphibious
– For this word, the “A” is short, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/æm-FIH-bee-ihs//æm.ˈfɪ.biː.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Amplified
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is long, and since the root-word ends with the letter “y” (converted to the letter “i” due to the the addtion of the suffix) – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/æM-plih-fai[d]//ˈæm.plɪ.faiː[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Amplify
 – For this word, the “A” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/æM-plih-fai//ˈæm.plɪ.faiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Amuse
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/uh-MYOOZ//ə(ʌ)ˈmjuz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Amused
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/uh-MYOOZ-[d]//ə(ʌ)ˈmjuz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Amusement
 – For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the first “e” is silent, and and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-MYOOZ-mihn[t]//ə(ʌ)ˈmjuz.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Amusing
 – For this word, For this word, the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-MYOO-zing//ə(ʌ)ˈmju.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

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– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter A ) –


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Aa . Bb . Cc . Dd . Ee . Ff . Gg . Hh . Ii . Jj . Kk . Ll . Mm . Nn . Oo . Pp . Qq . Rr . Ss . Tt . Uu . Vv . Ww . Xx . Yy . Zz
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