– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter B: Bd, Be, Bf ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily. The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

Bb

 

Ba – Bc . Be . Bf . Bg – Bi . Bj – Bl . Bm – Bo . Bp – BrBs – Bu . Bv – Bz

 

Be

Be
 – For this word, the “e” is long

/bee/ – /biː/ –

 

Beach
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/bee-ch/ – /biː.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable –

 

Beak
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/bee-[k]/ – /biː.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Bear
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphtong

/bayr//beɪɹ/

 

Beard
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “d” is a flap-d, but is (often) stopped

/beer-[d]/ – /biːɹ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Bearings
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/bayr-ingz//beɪɹ.ɪŋz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Beat
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the single long letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/bee-[t]/ – /biː.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Beaten
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the single long letter “e”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/BEE-[t]ihn/ – /ˈbiː.[t]ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Beatles
 – For the name of this classic musical group, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “t” is a flap-t, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “t” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/BEE-dəlz//ˈbiː.ɾəlz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Beautiful
 – For this word, the “ea” combination disappears, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into an true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /BYOU-dih-fəl//ˈbju.ɾə(ɪ).fəl/ – Notice also that  the stress is on the first syllable

 

Beautifully
 – For this word, the “ea” combination disappears, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” turns into an true-schwa, , and for the “-fully” suffix – the “u” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /BYOU-dəf-lee//ˈbju.ɾəf.liː/ –  Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Beauty
 – For this word, the “ea” combination disappears, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/BYOU-dee/ – /ˈbju.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Because
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “au” combination is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the “e” is silent

– /bee-KUHZ//biː.ˈkʌz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Became
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/bee-KAYM//biː.keiːm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Become
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the final “e” is silent

/bee-KUHM/ – /biː.ˈkʌm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable  –

 

Bed
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/beh[d]/ – /bɛ[d]/ –

 

Bedroom
 – For this word,the “e” id short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), and the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/BEH-dʒroom//ˈbɛ.dʒɹum/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Beef
 – For this word,the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/bee-f//biː.f/ – Notice also that the “f” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Been
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced like an i-schwa

/bihn//bə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is no discernible word-stress –

 

Beer
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/beer/ – /biːɹ/ –

 

Before
.– For this word, the “e” is long, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/bee-FOHR//biː.ˈfoɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Began
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “g” is hard, and the “a” is short

/bee-GæN/ – /biː.ˈgæn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Beggars
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /BEH-g’r-z//ˈbɛ.gɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Begin
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “g” is hard, and the”i” is short

/bee-GIHN//biː.ˈgɪn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Beginning
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “g” is hard, the first “i” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced like the single letter “n”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/bee-GIH-ning//biː.ˈgɪ.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Behalf
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the “a” is short, and the “l” is silent

/bee-HæF//biː.ˈhæf/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Behave
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/be-HAYV//biː.ˈheiːv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Behavior
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “i” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y”, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /bee-HAYV-y’r//biː.ˈheiːv.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Behind
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the “i” is long, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/bee-HAIN-[d]//biːˈhaiːn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

 

Beige
 – For this word, the “ei” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

– /bayzh//beiːʒ/

 

Beijing
 – For this word, the “ei” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “j” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and and the “-ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/bay-ZHING//beiː.ˈʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Being
 – For this word, the “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “e” and the “i” (this is the product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /BEE-ying//ˈbiː.jɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Belgian
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “g” is soft, the “ia” combination turns into an i-schwa

/BEHL-dʒihn/ – /ˈbɛl.dʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Belgium
 – For this name, the “e” is short, the “g” is soft, and the “iu” combination turns into a true-schwa

/BEHL-dʒəm//ˈbɛl.dʒəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Belief
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/bə-LEEF//bə.ˈliːf/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Beliefs
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/bə-LEEF-s//bə.ˈliːf.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a separate syllable –

 

Believe
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the last “e” is silent

– /bə-LEEV/ – /bə.ˈliːv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Believes
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the last “e” is silent, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /bə-LEEV-z//bə.ˈliːv.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Bell
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l”

/behl//bɛl/

 

Belong
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “ring” or “rung” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/bee-LAWNG//biːˈlɔŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Beloved
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is pronounced like the short “u”, and since this word is actually an adjective or noun, the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped (this is different than the standard “-ed” pronunciation for words which end with the sound of the letter “v”)

/bə-LUH-vih[d]/ – /bə.ˈlʌ.və(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Below
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like single long letter “o” (the “w” does not have any affect on the pronunciation of the “o”)

/bə-LOH//bə.ˈlo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Belt
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/behl-[t]//bɛl.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Benchmark
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “k” is (often) stopped

– /BEHNCH-mahr-[k]//ˈbɛntʃ.mɑɹ.[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

 

Benchmarking
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /BEHNCH-mahr-king//ˈbɛntʃ.mɑɹ.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Bend
 – For this word, the “e” is short

/behn-d//bɛn.d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Beneath
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/bə-NEETH//bə.ˈniːθ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Beneficial
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into true-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-cial” suffix – the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/beh-nə-FIH-shəl//ˌbɛ.nə.ˈfɪ.ʃəl/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Benefit
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/BEH-nih-fih[t]//ˈbɛ.nə(ɪ).fə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Benefits
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is an i-schwa

/BEH-nih-fih-ts//ˈbɛ.nə(ɪ).fə(ɪ).ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Benghazi
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “n” is pronounce as normal (the letter “g” which is directly after it does not affect the pronunciation at all), the “g” is hard, the “h” is silent, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/behn-GAH-zee/ – /bɛn.ˈgɑ.ziː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Benjamin
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the “i” is an i-schwa

/BEHN-dʒuh-mihn//ˈbɛn.dʒə(ʌ).mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Bent
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/behn-[t]//bɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Berkeley
.– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is silent, and the final “ey” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/B’R-k-lee//ˈbɚ.k.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “k” acts as a separate syllable

 

Berkshire
 – For this word, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ire” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /B’R-k-shigh-yr//ˈbɚ.k.ʃʌɪ.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “k” acts as a separate syllable

 

Berlin
.– For this word, the “e” disappears, and the “i” is short

/b’r-LIHN//bɚ.ˈlɪn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Bernard
 – For this name, the “e” disappears, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /b’r-NAHR-[d]//bɚ.nɑɹ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that and the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts like a third syllable

 

Beside
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “i” is long, the “d” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/bee-SAI[D]//biː.ˈsaiː[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Best
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/behs-[t]//bɛs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Bet
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “t” is (usually) stopped

/beh[t]//bɛ[t]/

 

Betrayed
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ay” combination is pronounced simply like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphtong – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /bee-CHRAY-[d]//biː.tʃɹeiː.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Better
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like a single flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BEH-d’r//ˈbɛ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Betting
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “tt” is pronounced simply like a single flap-t, and “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /BEH-ding//ˈbɛ.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Between
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/bee-TWEEN//biː.ˈtwiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Beverage
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BEHV-rih-dʒ/ – /ˈbɛv.ɹə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Beverages
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the word is plural – the “e” merges with the “-es” ending and turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/BEHV-rih-dʒihz/ – /ˈbɛv.ɹə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Beyond
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “y” takes the consonant sound, the “o” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /bee-YAHN-[d]//biː.ˈjɑn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Bf

 

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter B ) –


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