– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter B:  Bp, Bq, Br ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily. The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

Bb

 

Ba – Bc . Bd – Bf . Bg – Bi . Bj – Bl . Bm – Bo . Bq . Br . Bs – Bu . Bv – Bz

 

Bq

 

Br

Braces
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/BRAY-sihz//ˈbɹaiː.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Brain
.– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/brayn//bɹeiːn/

 

Branch
.– For this word, the “a” is short

/bræn-ch//bɹæn.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Brand
.– For this word, the “a” is short

/bræn-d//bɹæn.d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Brasil
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “s” is pronounced the letter “z”, and the “i” is short

– /bruh-ZIHL//bɹə(ʌ).ˈzɪl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Brasilian
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “s” is pronounced the letter “z”, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ian” suffix – the “i” (converted from the letter “y” of the root-word) is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /bruh-ZIHL//bɹə(ʌ).ˈzɪ.liː.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Brasil’s
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “s” is pronounced the letter “z”, the “i” is short, and the final (possessive) “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /bruh-ZIHL-z/ – /bɹə(ʌ).ˈzɪl.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Brave
.– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/brayv//bɹeiːv/

 

Bravely
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /BRAYV-lee//ˈbɹeiːv.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Brazil
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the “i” is short

– /bruh-ZIHL//bɹə(ʌ).ˈzɪl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Brazilian
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ian” suffix – the “i” (converted from the letter “y” of the root-word) is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /bruh-ZIHL//bɹə(ʌ).ˈzɪ.liː.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Breach
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/breech//bɹiːtʃ/

 

Bread
.– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/breh[d]//bɹɛ[ɾ]/ –

 

Break
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the True Long “A”

– /bray-k//bɹe.k/

 

Breakdown
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the True Long “A”, the “k” is (often) stopped, the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “now” or “how” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /bray[k]-down//bɹe[k].dɑun/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Breakfast
 – For this word, the”ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “k” is (usually) stopped, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/BREH[K]-fih-s[t]//ˈbɹɛ[k].fə(ɪ).s[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Breaks
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the True Long “A”

– /bray-ks//bɹe.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable –

 

Breakthrough
.– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the True Long “A”, the “th” combination is un-voiced, and the “ough” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”

/BRAYK-throo/ – /ˈbɹek.θɹu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Breakwater
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BRAYK-waw-d’r//ˈbɹek.wɑ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Breast
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/breh-st//bɹɛ.st/ – Notice also that the “st” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Breath
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/brehth//bɹɛθ/

 

Breathe
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/breeth//bɹiːð/

 

Breathing
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “th” combination is voiced, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BREE-thing/ – /ˈbɹiː.ðɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Breathes
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “th” combination is un-voiced, and for the “-es” ending – the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/breeth-z//bɹiːð.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Breed
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/bree[d]//bɹiː[ɾ]/

 

Bribe
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the second “b” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/brai[b]//ˈbɹaiː[b]/

 

Bribery
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and for the “-ery” suffix – the “e” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BRAI-b’r-ee//ˈbɹaiː.bɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Brick
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/brih-k//bɹɪ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Bride
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “d” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/brai[d]//ˈbɹaiː[ɾ]/

 

Bridge
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “dg” combination is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/brih-dʒ//bɹɪ.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Bridges
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “dg” combination is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/BRIH-dʒihz//ˈbɹɪ.dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Brief
 – For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/breef//bɹiːf/

 

Briefcase
 – This compound word is pronounced like two separate words – the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/BREEF-kays//ˈbɹiːf.keiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Briefly
 – For this word,the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/BREEF-lee//ˈbɹiːfɹ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Briefed
 – For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” of the “-ed” ending is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/breef-[t]//bɹiːf.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

 

Brigade
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “e” is silent

– /brih-GAY[D]//bɹə(ɪ).ˈge[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Bright
 – For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “night” or “sight”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/brigh-[t]//bɹʌiː.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Brilliant
 – For this word, the “first “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BRIH-lee-ihn-[t]//ˈbɹɪ.liː.ə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

 

Bring
 – For this word, the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/bring//bɹɪŋ/

 

Britain
.– For this word, the first “i” is short, the “t” becomes a glottal stop, and the “ai” combination turns into an i-schwa

/BRIH-ʔihn//ˈbɹɪ.ʔə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

British
.– For this word, the first “i” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-
voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BRIH-dihsh//ˈbɹɪ.ɾə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Broad
 – For this word, the “oa” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

/braw-[d]/ – /bɹɔ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the flap-d ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Broadcast
.– For this word, the “oa” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the “c” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/BRAW[D]-kæs-[t]//ˈbɹɔ[ɾ].kæs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Broaden
 – For this word, the “oa” combination sounds like the “aw” combination, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /BRAW-[d]’n//ˈbɹɔ[ɾ].ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Broadly
 – For this word, the “oa” combination sounds like the “aw” combination, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/BRAW-[d]-lee//ˈbɹɔ.[ɾ].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Brochure
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “ch” combination is pronounced as the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/broh-SH’R//bɹo.ˈʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Broccoli
 – For this word, the first “o” is short, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)the “o” disappears, and the final “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/BRAHK-lee/ – /ˈbɹɑk.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Broke
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “k” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/broh[k]//bɹo[k]/

 

Broken
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BROH-kihn//ˈbɹo.kə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Broth
 – For this word, the “o” sounds like the “aw” combination, and the “th” is un-voiced

– /braw-th//bɹɔ.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable –

 

Brother
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short “u”, the, “th” is voiced, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /BRUH-th’r//ˈbɹʌ.ðɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Brought
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “gh” combination is silent, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /braw-[t]/ – /bɹɔ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Brown
 – For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “now” or “how” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/brow-n//bɹau.n/ – Notice also that the “n” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Bruise
 – For this word, the “ui” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the “e” is silent

/brooz//bruz/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Brush
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

/bruh-sh//bɹʌ.ʃ/ – Notice also that the “sh” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Brushes
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/bruh-shihz//bɹʌ.ʃə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the “sh” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Brutal
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

/BROO-dəl//ˈbɹu.təl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Brutality
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “a” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/broo--lih-dee//bɹu.ˈtæ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter B ) –


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