– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter B ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.


Bb

 

Be . Bi . Bl . Bo . Br . Bu . By

 

Baby
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/BAY-bee/ – /ˈbeiː.biː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Babies
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/BAY-beez//ˈbeiː.biːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bachelor
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “e” disappears, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/Bæch-l’r//ˈbætʃ.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bachelorette
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the first “e” disappears, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ette” suffix – the first “e” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “t” but is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/bæch-l’r-EH[T]//bætʃ.lɚ.ˈɛ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Back
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) but is (often) stopped

– /bæ[k]/ – /bæ[k]/ –

Background
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced like the letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) but is (usually) stopped, the “g” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like an “ow” combination, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /[K]-grown[d]/ – /ˈbæ[k].gɹaun[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Backpack
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” disappears, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/[K]-pæ[k]/ – /ˈbæ[k].pæ[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Backward
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” disappears, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/[K]-w’r[d]/ – /ˈbæ[k].wɚ[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Backwards
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)the “a” disappears, the “d” is (almost) stopped, and the final “s” is pronounced (almost) like the letter “z”

/[K]-w’r-[d]z/ – /ˈbæ[k].wɚ.[d]z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “dz” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Bacteria
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, the “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/bæ[k]-TEER-ee-uh/ – /bæ[k].ˈtiːɹ.iː.ə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Bad
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

/bæ[d]/ – /bæ[ɾ]/ –

Bad-Tempered
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, the first “e” is short, the third “e” disappears, and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/bæ[d]-TEHM-p’r-[d]/ – /bæ[ɾ].ˈtɛm.pɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Badges
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “dg” combination is pronounced simply like the single soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/-dʒihz//ˈbæ.dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Badly
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/[D]-lee/ – /bæ[ɾ].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Bag
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “g” is hard but is (often) stopped

/bæ[g]/ – /bæ[g]/ –

Baggage
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-gih-dʒ/ – /ˈbæ.gə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

Bail-Outs
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and the “Ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination

/BAYL-ow-ts//ˈbeɪl.ɑu.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable –

Bake
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/bayk/ – /beiːk/ –

Bakery
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “e” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /BAY-kree/ – /ˈbeiː.kɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Baking
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “k” is (usually) almost stopped and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BAY-[k]ing/ – /ˈbeiː.[k]ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Balance
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-lihn-s/ – /bæ.lə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable

Balcony
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/BæL-kih-nee//ˈbæl.kə(ɪ).niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ball
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/bawl/ – /bɔl/ –

Ballet
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced like the single letter “l”, and the “et” ending is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

/bæ-LAY//bæ.ˈleiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Baltic
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/BAHL-tih[k]//ˈbɑl.tə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ban
 – For this word, the “a” is short

/bæn/ – /bæn/ –

Banana
 – For this word, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is short, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/bə--nuh//bə.ˈnæ.nə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Band
 – For this word, the “a” is short

/bæn-d/ – /bæn.d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable –

Bandage
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BæN-dih-dʒ/ – /ˈbæn.də(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

Bank
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it)

/bæng-k/ – /bæŋ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable –

Banker
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BæNG-k’r/ – /ˈbæŋ.kɚ/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable –

Bankruptcy
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the “t” is stopped, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long “e”

– /Bæŋ-Kruhp[t]-see/ – /ˈbæŋ.krə(ʌ)p[t].siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Banksy
 – For this name, the “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), and the final “y”

/BæNG-k-see/ – /ˈbæŋ.k.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Banned
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /bæn-[d]/ – /bæn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable –

Banquet
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/BæNG-kwih[t]//ˈbæŋ.kwə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Baptism
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like
the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/[P]-tih-zəm/ – /ˈbæ[p].tə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Baptized
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped, for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/[P]-taiz-[d]/ – /ˈbæ[p].taiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Bar
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/bahr/ – /bɑɹ/

Barbecue
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “e” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is hard, and the “final “ue” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”

– /BAHR-buh-kyou//ˈbɑɹ.bə(ʌ).kju/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Barcelona
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “c” is soft, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is long, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/bahr-sə-LOH-nuh//ˌbɑɹ.sə.ˈlo.nə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Bare
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/bayr//beɪɹ/

Bargain
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o” the “g” is hard, and the “ai” combination turns into an i-schwa

/BAHR-gihn/ – /ˈbɑɹ.gə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Barley
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the “ey” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/BAHR-lee/ – /ˈbɑɹ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Barricade
 – For this word, the “a” is long, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ade” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /BAYR-ih-kay-[d]/ – /ˈbeɪɹ.ə(ɪ).ke.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Barrier
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simple like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /BAYR-ee-’r/ – /ˈbeɪɹ.iː.ɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Barriers
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simple like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

– /BAYR-ee-’r-z/ – /ˈbeɪɹ.iː.ɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as fourth syllable

Base
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/bays/ – /beiːs/ –

Based
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “e” is silent, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /bays-[t]/ – /beiːs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable –

Bases
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “e” turns into an i-schwaI, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/BAY-sihz//ˈbeiː.sɪz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Basic
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /BAY-sih-[k]/ – /ˈbeiː.sə(ɪ).[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “k” ending acts as a third syllable

Basically
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BAY-sihk-lee/ – /ˈbeiː.sə(ɪ)k.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Basins
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/BAY-sihn-z//ˈbeiː.sə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Basis
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-sis” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BAY-sih-s/ – /ˈbeiː.sə(ɪ).s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable

Basket
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/BæS-kih[t]//ˈbæs.kə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bath
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/bæth/ – /bæθ/ –

Baths
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/bæth-s/ – /bæθ.s/ – Notice also that the final “s” acts as a separate syllable

Bathroom
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “th” is un-voiced, and the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/BæTH-room/ – /ˈbæθ.ɹum/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Battery
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced like the single flap-t (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ery” suffix – the “e” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-d’r-ee/ – /ˈbæ.ɾɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Batteries
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” disappears, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

– /-d’r-eez/ – /ˈbæ.ɾɚ.iːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Battle
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “t” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/-dəl/ – /ˈbæ.ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Bavaria
 – For this word, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to another), and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/buh-VAYR-ee-yuh//bə(ʌ).ˈveɪɹ.iː.jə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Bay
 – For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/bay/ – /beiː/ –

Be

Be
 – For this word, the “e” is long

/bee/ – /biː/ –

Beach
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/bee-ch/ – /biː.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable –

Beak
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/bee-[k]/ – /biː.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Bear
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphtong

/bayr//beɪɹ/

Beard
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “d” is a flap-d, but is (often) stopped

/beer-[d]/ – /biːɹ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Bearings
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/bayr-ingz//beɪɹ.ɪŋz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Beat
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the single long letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/bee-[t]/ – /biː.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Beaten
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the single long letter “e”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/BEE-[t]ihn/ – /ˈbiː.[t]ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Beatles
 – For the name of this classic musical group, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “t” is a flap-t, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “t” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/BEE-dəlz//ˈbiː.ɾəlz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Beautiful
 – For this word, the “ea” combination disappears, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into an true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /BYOU-dih-fəl//ˈbju.ɾə(ɪ).fəl/ – Notice also that  the stress is on the first syllable

Beautifully
 – For this word, the “ea” combination disappears, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” turns into an true-schwa, , and for the “-fully” suffix – the “u” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /BYOU-dəf-lee//ˈbju.ɾəf.liː/ –  Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Beauty
 – For this word, the “ea” combination disappears, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/BYOU-dee/ – /ˈbju.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Because
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “au” combination is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the “e” is silent

– /bee-KUHZ//biː.ˈkʌz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Became
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/bee-KAYM//biː.keiːm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Become
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the final “e” is silent

/bee-KUHM/ – /biː.ˈkʌm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable  –

Bed
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/beh[d]/ – /bɛ[d]/ –

Bedroom
 – For this word,the “e” id short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), and the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/BEH-dʒroom//ˈbɛ.dʒɹum/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Beef
 – For this word,the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/bee-f//biː.f/ – Notice also that the “f” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Been
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced like an i-schwa

/bihn//bə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is no discernible word-stress –

Beer
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/beer/ – /biːɹ/ –

Before (Be-fore)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/bee-FOHR//biːˈfoɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Began
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “g” is hard, and the “a” is short

/bee-GæN/ – /biː.ˈgæn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Beggars
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /BEH-g’r-z//ˈbɛ.gɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

Begin
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “g” is hard, and the”i” is short

/bee-GIHN//biːˈgɪn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Beginning
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “g” is hard, the first “i” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced like the single letter “n”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/bee-GIH-ning//biː.ˈgɪ.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Behalf
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the “a” is short, and the “l” is silent

/bee-HæF//biː.ˈhæf/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Behave
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/be-HAYV//biː.ˈheiːv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Behavior
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “i” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y”, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /bee-HAYV-y’r//biː.ˈheiːv.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Behind
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the “i” is long, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/bee-HAIN-[d]//biːˈhaiːn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Beige
 – For this word, the “ei” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

– /bayzh//beiːʒ/

Beijing
 – For this word, the “ei” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “j” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and and the “-ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/bay-ZHING//beiː.ˈʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Being
 – For this word, the “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “e” and the “i” (this is the product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /BEE-ying//ˈbiː.jɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Belgian
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “g” is soft, the “ia” combination turns into an i-schwa

/BEHL-dʒihn/ – /ˈbɛl.dʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Belgium
 – For this name, the “e” is short, the “g” is soft, and the “iu” combination turns into a true-schwa

/BEHL-dʒəm//ˈbɛl.dʒəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Belief
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, and the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/bee-LEEF//biːˈliːf/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Believe
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the last “e” is silent

– /bee-LEEV/ –/biː.ˈliːv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Believes
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the last “e” is silent, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /bee-LEEV-z//biː.ˈliːv.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Bell
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l”

/behl//bɛl/

Belong
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “ring” or “rung” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/bee-LAWNG//biːˈlɔŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Beloved
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is pronounced like the short “u”, and since this word is actually an adjective or noun, the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped (this is different than the standard “-ed” pronunciation for words which end with the sound of the letter “v”)

/bə-LUH-vih[d]/ – /bə.ˈlʌ.və(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Below
 – For this word, the “e” is long, and the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like single long letter “o” (the “w” does not have any affect on the pronunciation of the “o”)

/bee-LOH//biːˈlo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Belt
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/behl-[t]//bɛl.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Benchmark
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “k” is (often) stopped

– /BEHNCH-mahr-[k]//ˈbɛntʃ.mɑɹ.[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Benchmarking
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /BEHNCH-mahr-king//ˈbɛntʃ.mɑɹ.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bend
 – For this word, the “e” is short

/behn-d//bɛn.d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

Beneath
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/bee-NEETH//biːˈniːθ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Beneficial
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into true-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-cial” suffix – the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/beh-nə-FIH-shəl//ˌbɛ.nə.ˈfɪ.ʃəl/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Benefit
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/BEH-nih-fih[t]//ˈbɛ.nə(ɪ).fə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Benefits
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is an i-schwa

/BEH-nih-fih-ts//ˈbɛ.nə(ɪ).fə(ɪ).ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Benghazi
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “n” is pronounce as normal (the letter “g” which is directly after it does not affect the pronunciation at all), the “g” is hard, the “h” is silent, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/behn-GAH-zee/ – /bɛn.ˈgɑ.ziː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Bent
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/behn-[t]//bɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Berkeley
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is silent, and the final “ey” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/B’RK-lee//ˈbɚk.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Berkshire
 – For this word, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ire” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /B’RK-shigh-yr//ˈbɚk.ʃʌɪ.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Berlin
– For this word, the “e” disappears, and the “i” is short

/b’r-LIHN//bɚ.ˈlɪn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Bernard
 – For this name, the “e” disappears, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /b’r-NAHR-[d]//bɚ.nɑɹ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that and the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts like a third syllable

Beside
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “i” is long, the “d” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/bee-SAI[D]//biːˈsaiː[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Best
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/behs-[t]//bɛs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Bet
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “t” is (usually) stopped

/beh[t]//bɛ[t]/

Betrayed
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ay” combination is pronounced simply like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphtong – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /bee-CHRAY-[d]//biː.tʃɹeiː.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

Better
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like a single flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BEH-d’r//ˈbɛ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Betting
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “tt” is pronounced simply like a single flap-t, and “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /BEH-ding//ˈbɛ.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Between
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/bee-TWEEN//biːˈtwiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Beverage
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BEHV-rih-dʒ/ – /ˈbɛv.ɹə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

Beverages
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the word is plural – the “e” merges with the “-es” ending and turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/BEHV-rih-dʒihz/ – /ˈbɛv.ɹə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

Beyond
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “y” takes the consonant sound, the “o” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /bee-YAHN-[d]//biː.ˈjɑn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

Bi

Bias
 – For this word, the “i” is long,  there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to another), and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/BAI-yihs//ˈbaiː.jə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Biased
 – For this word, the “i” is long,  there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to another), the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/BAI-yihs-[t]//ˈbaiː.jə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Biased
 – For this word, the “i” is long,  there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to another), the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/BAI-yihs-[t]//ˈbaiː.jə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Bible
 – For this word, the “i” is long, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/BAI-bəl//ˈbaiː.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bicycle
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the first “c” is soft, the “y” turns into an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “c” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/BIGH-sih-kəl//ˈbʌiː.sə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bid
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /bih[d]//bɪ[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Big
 – For this word, the “i” is short

/bihg//bɪg/

Bike
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/bighk//bʌiːk/

Bilingual (bi-Lingual)
– For this word, the “i” is long, the “-in” combination is pronounced like an “-ing” combination, the “g” is hard (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of the “-ing” letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the letter “w”, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/bai-LING-gwawl//baiː.ˈlɪŋ.gwɔl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Bilingualism (bi-Lingual-ism)
– For this word, the “i” is long, the “-in” combination is pronounced like an “-ing” combination, the “g” is hard (pronounced separately from the letter “n”), the “u” is pronounced like the letter “w”, for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/bai-LING-gwawl-ih-zəm//baiː.ˈlɪŋ.gwɔl.ə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Bill
 – For this word, the “i” is short

/bihl//bɪl/

Billion
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l”, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “o”, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa

/BIHL-ee-yihn//ˈbɪl.iː.jə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Billionaires
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l”(this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “o”, the “o” turns into a i-schwathe “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/BIHL-ee-yihn-ayr-z/ – /ˈbɪl.iː.jə(ɪ)n.eɪɹ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and then that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

Bin
 – For this word, the “i” is short

/bihn//bɪn/

Bind
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “d” is (often) stopped

/bain-[d]//baiːn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Binds
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “d” is almost stopped, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/bain-dz//baiːn.dz/ – Notice also that the “dz” ending acts as a second syllable

Bio
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the “o” is long

/BAI-oh//ˈbaiː.o/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Biodegrade (bio-Degrade)
– For this word, the “i” is long, the “o” is long, the “e” is long, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ade” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/bai-oh-dee-GRAY[D]/ – /baiː.o.diː.ˈgɹeiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fourth syllable –

Biologist
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and for the “-ologist” suffix – the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/bai-AH-lə-dʒihs-[t]/ – /baiː.ˈɑ.lə.dʒə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Biology
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and for the “-ology” suffix – the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/bai-AH-lih-dʒee/ – /baiː.ˈɑ.lə(ɪ).dʒiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Biosphere
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “o” is long, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” is long, and the final “e” is silent

– /BAI-oh-sfeer//ˈbaiː.o.sfiːɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Biracial (bi-Racial)
– For this word, the first “i” is long, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-cial” suffix – the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/bai-RAY-shəl//baiː.ˈreiː.ʃəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Bird
 – For this word, the “i” disappears, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/b’r-[d]//bɚ.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Birdie
 – For this word, the “i” disappears, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “ie” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /B’R-dee//ˈbɚ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Birth
 – For this word, the “i” disappears, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/b’r-th//bɚ.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable

Birthday
 – For this word, the “i” disappears, the “th” is un-voiced, and the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /B’RTH-day//ˈbɚθ.deiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Births
 – For this word, the “i” disappears, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/b’r-ths//bɚ.θs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ths” ending acts as a second syllable –

Biscuit
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the “c” is hard, and the “ui” combination is pronounced simply like the single i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/BIHS-kih[t]//ˈbɪs.kə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Biscuits
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “c” is hard, and the “ui” combination is pronounced simply like the single i-schwa

– /BIHS-kih-ts//ˈbɪs.kɪ.ts/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

Bit
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/bih[t]//bɪ[t]/

Bitchy
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /BIH-chee//ˈbɪ.tʃiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bite
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/bigh[t]//bʌiː[t]/

Bitter
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BIH-d’r//ˈbɪ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bitterly
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/BIH-d’r-lee//ˈbɪ.ɾɚ.liː/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bizarre
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/bih-ZAHR//bə(ɪ).ˈzɑɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Bl

Black
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/blæ-k//blæ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Blacksmith
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/BLæK-smih-th/ – /ˈblæk.smɪ.θ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “th” ending acts as a third syllable

Blade
– For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/blay-[d]//ble.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

Blame
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/blaym//bleiːm/

Blank
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it)

/blæng-k//blæŋ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Blend
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/blehn-[d]//blɛn.[d]/

Blind
– For this word, the “i” is long

/blain-d//blaiːn.d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

Blighting
 – For this word, the “igh” combination sounds like in the word “night” or “flight” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is a flap-t, and “-ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /BLIGH-ding/ – /ˈblʌiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Blizzard
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “zz” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “z”, the “a” disappears, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/BLIH-z’r-[d]/ – /ˈblɪ.zɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable –

Bloated
 – For this word, the “oa” combination is pronounced like the long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/BLOH-dhi[d]//ˈblo.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Block
– For this word, the “o” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/blah-k//blɑ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Blockbuster
– For this word, the “o” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” but is almost stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BLAH[K]-buhs-t’r//ˈblɑ[k].bʌs.tɚ/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Blocking
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BLAH-king//ˈblɑ.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Blonde
– For this word, the “o” is short, and the final “e” is silent

/blahn-d//ˈblɑn.d / – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

Blondes
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/blahn-dz//ˈblɑn.dz / – Notice also that the “dz” ending acts as a second syllable –

Blood
– For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/bluh-[d]//blʌ.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

Blouse
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/blows//blɑus/

Blow
 – For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”)

/bloh//blo/

Blue
 – For this word, the “ue” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”

/bloo//blu/

Blurry
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /BL’R-ee//ˈblɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bo

Board
 – For this word, the “oa” is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /bohr-[d]//boɹ.[d]/ – Notice also that the flap-d ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Boards/’s
 – For this word, the “oa” is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “d” is (usually) stopped, and the possessive or plural “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /bohr-[d]z//boɹ.[d]z/ – Notice also that the “dz” ending (even when the “d” is stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Boat
 – For this word, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /boh[t]//bo[t]/ –

Bod
 – For this word, the “o” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /bah[d]/ – /bɑ[d]/ –

Body
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/BAH-dee//ˈbɑ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bogus
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “g” is hard, and the “u” turns into an i-schwa

/BOH-gihs//ˈbo.gə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Boil
 – For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, and there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “oi” combination and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)

/boy-yl//ˈboiː.yl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bolt
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/bol-[t]/ – /bol.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Bomb
– For this word, the “o” is short, and the final “b” is silent

/bahm//bɑm/

Bombarded
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the first “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/bahm-BAHR-dih[d]//bɑm.ˈbɑɹ.ɾə(ɪ)ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Bone
– For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/bohn//bon/

Bonfire
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “r”, and the final “e” is silent

/BAHN-figh-yr//ˈbɑn.fʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “r” ending acts as a third syllable –

Bonus
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the “u” turns into an i-schwa

/BOH-nihs/ – /ˈbo.nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bonuses
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “u” turns into an i-schwa, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/BOH-nih-sihz/ – /ˈbo.nə(ɪ).sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Book
– For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced as a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (like in the word “foot” or “put”)

/bəih-k//bəɪ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable –

Booked
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced as a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (like in the word “foot” or “put”), and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/bəih[k]-t//bəɪ[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Books
– For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced as a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (like in the word “foot” or “put”)

/bəih-ks//bəɪ.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable –

Bookstore
– For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced as a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (like in the word “foot” or “put”), the “k” is (usually) stopped, the third “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/BəIH[K]-stohr//ˌbəɪ[k].stoɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Boot
– For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/boo[t]//bu[t]/

Boots
– For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/boo-ts//bu.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” combination acts as a second syllable

Border
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BOHR-d’r//ˈboɹ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bore
– For this word, the “o” is long, the and the final “e” is silent

/bohr//boɹ/

Bored
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (sometimes) stopped

/bohr[d]/ – /boɹ[ɾ]/ –

Boring
– For this word, the “o” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BOH-ring//ˈbo.ɹɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Born
 – For this word, the “o” is long

– /bohrn//boɹn/ –

Borrow
– For this word, the first “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “rr” combination is pronounced like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ow” combination is pronounced like the single long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”)

/BAW-roh//ˈbɔ.ɹo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bosnia
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/BAHZ-nee-yuh//ˈbɑz.niː.jə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Boss
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/baws//bɔs/

Botanical
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the first “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/buh--nih-kəl//bə(ʌ).ˈtæ.nə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Botanist
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “t” becomes a glottal stop, the “a” virtually disappears, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /BAH-ʔ-nihs-[t]/ – /ˈbɑ.ʔ.nə(ɪ)s.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Botany
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “t” becomes a glottal stop, the “a” virtually disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /BAH-ʔnee/ – /ˈbɑ.ʔ.niː/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Both
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/boh-th//boθ/

Bother
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “th” combination is voiced, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BAH-th’r//ˈbɑ.ðɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bottle
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “t” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/BAH-dəl//ˈbɑ.ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bottom
– For this word, the first “o” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is one of two standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the second “o” turns into a true-schwa

/BAH-dəm//ˈbɑ.ɾəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bought
 – For this word, the “ough” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /baw[t]//bɔ[t]/ –

Bounce
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /bowns//bauns/

Bound
– For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination

/bown-d//baun.d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

Boundaries
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g”, the “a” disappears, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” sounds almost like the letter “z”

– /BOWN-dʒreez//ˈbaun.dʒɹiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bouquet
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the letter “k”, and the “et” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

/boo-KAY//bu.ˈkeiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Boutique
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the letter “k”, and the final “e” is silent

– /boo-TEEK//bu.ˈtiːk/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Boutiques
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the letter “k”, and the “e” is silent

– /boo-TEE-ks//bu.ˈtiː.ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a third syllable

Bowing
 – For this word, the “ow” combination sounds like in the word “how” or “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and “-ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /BOW-ing//ˈbau.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bowl
– For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”)

/bohl//bol/

Box
– For this word, the “o” is short, and the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/bah-ks//bɑ.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable

Boxes
– For this word, the “o” is short, and the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” and the final “s” is pronounced (almost) like the letter “z”

/BAHK-sihz//bɑk.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable

Boy
– For this word, the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “toy”, or “joy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/boy//boiː/

Boyfriend
– For this word, the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “toy” or “joy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/BOY-frehn-[d]//ˈboiː.frɛn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Br

Brain
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/brayn//bɹeiːn/

Branch
– For this word, the “a” is short

/bræn-ch//bɹæn.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

Brand
– For this word, the “a” is short

/bræn-d//bɹæn.d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

Brasil
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “s” is pronounced the letter “z”, and the “i” is short

– /bruh-ZIHL//bɹə(ʌ).ˈzɪl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Brasilian
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “s” is pronounced the letter “z”, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ian” suffix – the “i” (converted from the letter “y” of the root-word) is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /bruh-ZIHL//bɹə(ʌ).ˈzɪ.liː.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Brasil’s
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “s” is pronounced the letter “z”, the “i” is short, and the final (possessive) “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /bruh-ZIHL-z/ – /bɹə(ʌ).ˈzɪl.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Brave
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/brayv//bɹeiːv/

Bravely
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /BRAYV-lee//ˈbɹeiːv.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Brazil
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the “i” is short

– /bruh-ZIHL//bɹə(ʌ).ˈzɪl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Brazilian
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ian” suffix – the “i” (converted from the letter “y” of the root-word) is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /bruh-ZIHL//bɹə(ʌ).ˈzɪ.liː.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Breach
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/breech//bɹiːtʃ/

Bread
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/breh[d]//bɹɛ[ɾ]/ –

Break
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the True Long “A”

– /bray-k//bɹe.k/

Breakdown
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the True Long “A”, the “k” is (often) stopped, the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “now” or “how” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /bray[k]-down//bɹe[k].dɑun/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Breakfast
 – For this word, the”ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “k” is (usually) stopped, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/BREH[K]-fih-s[t]//ˈbɹɛ[k].fə(ɪ).s[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a third syllable –

Breaks
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the True Long “A”

– /bray-ks//bɹe.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable –

Breakthrough (Break-through)
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the True Long “A”, the “th” combination is un-voiced, and the “ough” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”

/BRAYK-throo/ – /ˈbɹek.θɹu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Breakwater
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BRAYK-waw-d’r//ˈˈbɹek.wɑ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Breast
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/breh-st//bɹɛ.st/ – Notice also that the “st” ending acts as a second syllable

Breath
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/brehth//bɹɛθ/

Breathe
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/breeth//bɹiːð/

Breathing
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “th” combination is voiced, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BREE-thing/ – /ˈbɹiː.ðɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Breathes
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “th” combination is un-voiced, and for the “-es” ending – the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/breeth-z//bɹiːð.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a separate syllable

Breed
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/bree[d]//bɹiː[ɾ]/

Bribe
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the second “b” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/brai[b]//ˈbɹaiː[b]/

Bribery
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and for the “-ery” suffix – the “e” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BRAI-b’r-ee//ˈbɹaiː.bɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Brick
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/brih-k//bɹɪ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Bride
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “d” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/brai[d]//ˈbɹaiː[ɾ]/

Bridge
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “dg” combination is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/brih-dʒ//bɹɪ.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable

Bridges
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “dg” combination is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/BRIH-dʒihz//ˈbɹɪ.dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable

Brief
 – For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/breef//bɹiːf/

Briefcase
 – This compound word is pronounced like two separate words – the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/BREEF-kays//ˈbɹiːf.keiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Briefly
 – For this word,the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/breef-lee//ˈbɹiːfɹ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Briefed
 – For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” of the “-ed” ending is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/breef-[t]//bɹiːf.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

Brigade
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “e” is silent

– /brih-GAY[D]//bɹə(ɪ).ˈge[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Bright
 – For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “night” or “sight”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/brigh-[t]//bɹʌiː.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Brilliant
 – For this word, the “first “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BRIH-lee-ihn-[t]//ˈbɹɪ.liː.ə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Bring
 – For this word, the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/bring//bɹɪŋ/

Britain
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the “t” becomes a glottal stop, and the “ai” combination turns into an i-schwa

/BRIH-ʔihn//ˈbɹɪ.ʔə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

British
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-
voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BRIH-dihsh//ˈbɹɪ.ɾə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Broad
 – For this word, the “oa” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

/braw-[d]/ – /bɹɔ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the flap-d ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Broadcast (Broad-cast)
– For this word, the “oa” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the “c” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/BRAW[D]-kæs-[t]//ˈbɹɔ[ɾ].kæs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Broaden
 – For this word, the “oa” combination sounds like the “aw” combination, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /BRAW-[d]’n//ˈbɹɔ[ɾ].ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Broadly
 – For this word, the “oa” combination sounds like the “aw” combination, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/BRAW-[d]-lee//ˈbɹɔ.[ɾ].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Brochure
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “ch” combination is pronounced as the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/broh-SH’R//bɹo.ˈʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Broccoli
 – For this word, the first “o” is short, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)the “o” disappears, and the final “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/BRAHK-lee/ – /ˈbɹɑk.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Broke
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “k” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/broh[k]//bɹo[k]/

Broken
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BROH-kihn//ˈbɹo.kə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Broth
 – For this word, the “o” sounds like the “aw” combination, and the “th” is un-voiced

– /braw-th//bɹɔ.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable –

Brother
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short “u”, the, “th” is voiced, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /BRUH-th’r//ˈbɹʌ.ðɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Brought
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “gh” combination is silent, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /braw-[t]/ – /bɹɔ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Brown
 – For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “now” or “how” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/brow-n//bɹau.n/ – Notice also that the “n” ending acts as a second syllable

Bruise
 – For this word, the “ui” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the “e” is silent

/brooz//bruz/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

Brush
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

/bruh-sh//bɹʌ.ʃ/ – Notice also that the “sh” ending acts as a second syllable

Brushes
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/bruh-shihz//bɹʌ.ʃə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the “sh” ending acts as a second syllable

Brutal
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

/BROO-dəl//ˈbɹu.təl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Brutality
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “a” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/broo--lih-dee//bɹu.ˈtæ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Bu

Bubble
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “bb” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “b”, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “bb” combination and the letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/BUH-bəl//ˈbʌ.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Buckingham
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), “-ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “h” is pronounced, and the “a” is short

– /BUH-king-hæm/ – /ˈbʌ.kɪŋ.hæm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Buddha
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “dd” combination is pronounced simply as the single flap-d (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “h” is silent, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/BOO-duh//ˈbu.ɾə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Buddhist
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “dd” combination is pronounced simply as the single flap-d (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “h” is silent, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BOO-dihs[t]//ˈbu.ɾə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Buddy
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “dd” combination is pronounced simply as the single flap-d (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/BUH-dee//ˈbʌ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Budget
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “dg” combination is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/BUH-dʒih-[t]/ – /ˈbʌ.dʒə(ɪ).[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts like a third syllable

Budgeted
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “dg” combination is pronounced simply like the single soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /BUH-dʒih-dih[d]//ˈbʌ.dʒə(ɪ).ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Buff
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the final “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /buhf//bʌf/

Buffalo
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “o” is long

/BUH-fuh-loh//ˈbʌ.fə(ʌ).lo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Buffet
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a u-shwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “et” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

– /buh-FAY//bə(ʌ).ˈfeiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Bug
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the “g” is hard

/buhg//bʌg/ – Notice also that the “g” ending acts as second syllable

Bugs
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /buh-gz//bʌ.gz/ – Notice also that the “gz” ending acts as a second syllable –

Build
 – For this word, the “ui” combination is pronounced like the short letter “i”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/bihl-[d]/ – /bɪl[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Building
 – For this word, the “ui” combination is pronounced like the short letter “i”, and the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/bihl-[d]ing/ – /bɪl.[ɾ]ɪŋ/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Built
 – For this word, the “ui” combination is pronounced like the short letter “i”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /bihl-[t]//bɪl.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable –

Bulgaria
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “a” is turns into a u-schwa

– /bəl-GAYR-ee-yuh//bəl.ˈgeɪɹ.iː.jə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Bullet
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/Bə-lih-[t]//ˈbə.lə(ɪ).[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Bulletin
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “i” is an i-schwa

/-lih-tihn//ˈbə.lə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Bullish
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/Bə-lihsh//ˈbə.lə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bully
 – For this word, the “u” turns into an true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/-lee//ˈbə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bullying
 – For this word, the “u” turns into an true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “y” and the “i” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and “-ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-lee-ying//ˈbə.liː.jɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bump
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/buhm[p]/ – /bʌm[p]/ –

Bunch
 – For this word, the “u” is short

/buhn-ch//bʌn.t ʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

Bundle
 – For this word, the “u” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “d” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/BUHN-dəl//ˈbʌ.dəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bundling
 – For this word, the “u” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “d” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BUHN-də-ling//ˈbʌ.də.lɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Buoy
 – For this word, the “uo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/BOO-ee//ˈbu.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Burbling
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/B’R-bə-ling/ – /bɚ.bə.lɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bureau
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “eau” combination is pronounced like the long letter “o”

/BYOO-roh//ˈbju.ɹo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bureaucracy
 – For this word, the first “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “eau” combination is pronounced like the long letter “o”, the first “c” is hard, and for the “-acy” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /byoo-RAHK-rə-see//bju.ˈɹɑ.kɹə.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Burglar
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, the “g” is hard, and the “a” disappears

/B’R-gl’r//ˈbɚ.glɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Buried
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and since the root-word ends with the letter “y” (converted to an “i” due to the addition of the suffix) – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

/BAYR-ee[d]//ˈbeɪɹ.iː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Burn
 – For this word, the “u” disappears

/b’rn//bɚn/

Burnt
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/b’rn-[t]//bɚn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Burst
– For this word, the “u” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/b’r-s[t]//bɚ.s[t]/ – Notice also that the “st” ending acts as a second syllable

Bury
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/BAYR-ee//ˈbeɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Bus
 – For this word, the “u” is short

/buhs//bʌs/

Bush
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa (like in the word “foot” or “put”)

/bəsh//bəʃ/

Bushes
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa (like in the word “foot” or “put”), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /-shihz//ˈbə.ʃə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Busiest
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /BIH-zee-ihs-[t]//ˈbɪ.ziː.ɪs.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Business
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” disappears, and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /BIHZ-nihs//ˈbɪz.nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Businesses
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” disappears, for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /BIHZ-nihs-ihz/ – /ˈbɪz.nə(ɪ)s.ɪz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Businessman
– For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” disappears, for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “a” is short

/BIHZ-nihs-mæn//ˈˈbɪz.nə(ɪ)s.mæn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Businesswoman
– For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” disappears, for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the “a” is short

/BIHZ-nihs-wə-mæn//ˈˈbɪz.nə(ɪ)s.wə.mæn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Busses
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/BUH-sihz//ˈbʌ.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Busy
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /BIH-zee//ˈbɪ.ziː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

But
– For this word, the “u” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/buh[t]//bʌ[t]/

Butcher
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (like in the word “foot” or “put”), the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /-ch’rz//ˈbə.tʃɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Butchers/’s
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (like in the word “foot” or “put”), the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /-ch’rz//ˈbə.tʃɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Butter
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BUH-d’r//ˈbʌ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Button
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “tt” turns into a glottal stop, and the “o” disappears

/BUH[T]-‘n//ˈbʌ.’ʔn / – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Buttons
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “tt” turns into a glottal stop, and the “o” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/BUH[T]-‘n-z//ˈbʌ.’ʔn.z / – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Buy
 – For this word, the “uy” combination is pronounced like the long letter “i”

– /bai//baiː/

Buyer
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, the “y” takes the consonant sound, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /BAI-y’r/ – /ˈbaiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Buying
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, the “y” takes the consonant sound, and “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BAI-ying/ – /ˈbaiː.jɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Buzz-Word
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “zz” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “z” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “o” disappears

/BUHZ-w’rd-z/ – /ˈbʌz.wɚd.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Buzz-Words
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “zz” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “z” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)the “o” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/BUHZ-w’rd-z/ – /ˈbʌz.wɚd.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

By

By
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/bai//baiː/

Bye
– For this word, the “ye” combination is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/bai//baiː/

Bystander (By-stander)
– For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, the “a” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, and and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/BAI-s-tæn-d’r//baiː.s.tæn.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter B ) –


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