– American English Pronunciation–

– ( Letter C:  Ca, Cb, Cc ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily. The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

Cc

 

Cb . Cc . Cd – Cf . Cg – Ci . Cj – Cl . Cm – Col . Com . Con . Coo – CozCp – Cr . Cs – Cu . Cv – Cz

 

 

Cabinet
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “b” is (often) stopped, the “i” is almost silent, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/[B]-(i)-nih[t]/ – /ˈkæ[b].(i).nə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Cable
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/KAY-bəl/ – /ˈkeiː.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Cafeteria
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the first “e” turns into a true-schaw, the second “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/kæ-fuh-TEER-ee-yuh//kæ.fə(ʌ).ˈtiːɹ.iːjə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Cage
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is TRUE Long “A”, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/kay-dʒ//ke.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Cairo
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the final “o” is long

/KIGH-roh//ˈkʌiː.ɹo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Cajun
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is TRUE Long “A”, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), and the “u” turns into an i-schwa

/KAY-dʒihn/ – /ke.dʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Cake
 – For this word, The “C” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “k” is (sometimes) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/kay-[k]/ – /keiː[k]/ –

 

Calamari
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the second “a” turns into a true-schwa, the third “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/kah-lə-MAH-ree/ – /kɑ.lə.ˈmɑ.ɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

 

Calamity
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is short,, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kə--mih-dee//kə.ˈlæ.mə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Calculate
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the second “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KæL-kyou-lay[t]/ – /ˈkæl.kju.le[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Calculating
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the second “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” (usually) turns into a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KæL-kyou-lay-ding//ˈkæl.kju.leiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Calculation
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” is short, the second “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kæl-kyou-LAY-shihn/ – /kæl.ju.ˈleiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

 

Calculator
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the second “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is  a flap-t, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KæL-kyou-lay-d’r/ – /ˈkæl.kju.le.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Calf
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the “l” is silent

/kæf//kæf/

 

California
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the first “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the “second “i” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/kæ-lih-FOHRN-yuh//kæ.lə(ɪ).ˈforn.jə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Call
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like an “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination sounds simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /kawl/ – /kɔl/ – 

 

Called
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “ll” combination is pronounced like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /kawl-[d]/ – /kɔl.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Calm
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination

/kahlm/ – /kɑlm/ –

 

Calmed
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and since the root-word ends with the letter “m” – the “e” of  the “-ed” ending is silent

– /kawlm-d/ – /kɔlm.d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Calming
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “l” is almost silent, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAWL-ming/ – /ˈkɔ[l]m.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Calmly
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAWL-m-lee//ˈkɔl.m.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Calmness
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KAW[L]M-nihss//ˈkɔ[l]m.nə(ɪ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Calories
 – for this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “o” disappears, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/-l’r-eez//ˈkæ.lɚ.iːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Camaraderie
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the fist “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second, the second “a” disappears, the third “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “d” is a flap-d, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /kəm-RAH-d’r-ee//kəm.ˈrɑ.ɾɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Came
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/kaym/ – /keiːm/ –

 

Camera
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “e” disappears, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/KæM-ruh//ˈkæm.ɹə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Cameras
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “e” disappears, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/KæM-ruhz//ˈkæm.ɹə(ʌ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Cameron
 – For this name, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “e” disappears, and the “o” turns into a true-schwa

– /KæM-rən//ˈkæm.rən/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Camp
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “p” if (often) stopped

/kæm-[p]/ – /kæm.[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Campaign
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “g” is silent

/kæm-PAYN/ – /kæm.ˈpeiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Campaigners
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “g” is silent, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/kæm-PAYN/ – /kæm.ˈpeiːnɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Camping
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KæM-ping/ – /kæm.pɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Campus
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the “u” turns into an i-schwa

/KæM-pihs/ – /ˈkæm.pə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Can
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “a” is short

– /kæn/ – /kæn/ –

 

Canada
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” is short, the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/-nih-duh//ˈkæ.nə(ɪ).də(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Canadian
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, and for the “-ian” suffix – the “i” (converted from the letter “y” of the root-word) is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kə-NAY-dee-ihn//ˈkə.ne.diː.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Canal
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the second “a” is short

– /kuh-NæL//kə(ʌ).ˈnæl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Canals
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is short, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /kuh-NæL-z//kə(ʌ).ˈnæl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Canal
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the second “a” is short

/kuh-NæL//kə(ʌ).ˈnæl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Canary
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /kuh-NAYR-ee//kə(ʌ).ˈneɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Cancel
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the second “c” is soft, and the “e” turns into a true-schwa

/KæN-səl//ˈkæn.səl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Cancelled
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the second “c” is soft, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /KæN-səl-[d]//ˈkæn.səl.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Cancer
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the second “c” is soft, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KæN-s’r/ – /ˈkæn.sɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Candidate
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KæN-dih-day[t]/ – /ˈkæn.də(ɪ).ɾe[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Candy
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/KæN-dee/ – /ˈkæn.diː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Cannot (Can not)
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” disappears, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is short, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/k’-NAH-[t]/ – /k’.nɑ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Canoe
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the “oe” combination is pronounced like the the long letter “u”

/kuh-NOO//kə(ʌ).ˈnu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Can’t
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the “t” is (usually) stopped

– /kæn-[t]/ – /kæn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Cap
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/kæ[p]/ – /kæ[p]/ –

 

Capabilities
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” (usually) turns into a flap-d, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /kay-puh-BIHL-ih-deez//keiː.pə(ʌ).ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

 

Capability
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-ability” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” (usually) turns into a flap-d, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /kay-puh-BIHL-ih-dee//keiː.pə(ʌ).ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

 

Capable
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KAY-puh-bəl//ˈkeiː.pə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Capacity
 – For this word, the first “C” is hard, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is short, the second “c” is soft, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kuh--sih-dee//kə(ʌ).ˈpæ.sə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Capital
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-pih-dəl/ – /ˈkæ.pə(ɪ).ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Capitalize
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-pih-dəl-aiz/ – /ˈkæ.pə(ɪ).ɾəl.aiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Captain
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, and the “ai” combination turns into an i-schwa

– /[P]-tihn//ˈkæ[p].tə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Captivating
 – for this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, the first “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the second “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-dih-vay-ding/ – /ˈkæ[p].də(ɪ).veiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Captive
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /[P]-tihv//ˈkæ[p].də(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Capture
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/[P]-ch’r/ – /ˈkæ[p].tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Car
 – For this word, The “C” is hard, and the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

– /kahr//kɑɹ/

 

Carafe
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is short, and the final “e” is silent

/kuh-RæF//kə(ʌ)ˈræf/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Carbohydrates
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “o” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kahr-boh-HIGH-dʒray-ts//kɑɹ.bo.ˈhʌiː.dʒɹe.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Caramel
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the and the “e” is short

/KAYR-uh-mehl//ˈkeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).mɛl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Carbs
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “b” is (often) stopped, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /kahr[b]-z//kɑɹ[b].z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable –

 

Card
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/kahr[d]/ – /kɑɹ[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable –

 

Cards
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “d” is (often) stopped, and the final “s” is pronounced (almost) like the letter “z”

/kahr-dz/ – /kɑɹ.dz/ – Notice also that the “dz” ending acts as a separate syllable –

 

Cardboard
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “d” is (usually) stopped, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/KAHR[D]-bohr[d]/ – /ˈkɑɹ[d].boɹ[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

 

Cardio
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “o” is long

/KAHR-dee-yoh//ˈkɑɹ.ɾiː.jo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Care
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/kayr/ – /keɪɹ/ –

 

Career
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/kuh-REE-r/ – /kə(ʌ).ˈɹiː-ɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable, that the “r” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Careful
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” is silent, and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAYR-fəl/ – /ˈkeɪɹ.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Carefully
.– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” is silent, and for the “-fully” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAYR-fə-lee//ˈkeɪɹ.fə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Careless
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “e” is silent, and for the “-less” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAYR-lihs/ – /ˈkeɪɹ.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Caribbean
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is an i-schwa, the “bb” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “b” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is long, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/kayr-ih-BEE-ihn/ – /keɪɹ.ə(ɪ).ˈbiː.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

 

Carpet
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (almost always) stopped

/KAHR-pih[t]/ – /ˈkɑɹ.pə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Carpool
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/KAHR-pool//ˈkɑɹ.pul/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Carriage
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced as the Long “A” / Short “I” diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is silent and does not affect the pronunciation in any way but is simply there because this word is actually the word “carry” with the suffix “age” — therefore the “i” is only there as the grammatical rule of changing the final “y” to an “i” before adding the suffix, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAYR-ihdʒ//ˈkeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Carrot
 – for this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (almost always) stopped

– /KAYR-ih-[t]/ – /ˈkeɪɹ.ə(ɪ).[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Carrots
 – for this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

– /KAYR-ih-ts/ – /ˈkeɪɹ.ə(ɪ).ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Carry
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/KAYR-ee/ – /ˈkeɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Cars
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” sounds like the short letter “o”, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /kahr-z/ – /kɑɹ.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable –

 

Cartoon
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /kahr-TOON//kɑɹ.ˈtun/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Cartridges
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is an i-schwa, the “dg” combination is pronounced simply like the single soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” of the “-es” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/KAHR-chrih-dʒihz//ˈkɑɹ.tʃɹə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Case
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/kays/ – /keiːs/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable –

 

Cash
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

/kæsh/ – /kæʃ/ – Notice also that the “sh” ending acts as a second syllable –

 

Cashew
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the “ew” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”

– /kæ-SHYOO//kæ.ˈʃju/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Casino
 – For this word, The “C” is hard, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “o” is long

– /kuh-SEE-noh//kə(ʌ).ˈsiː.no/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Cast
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) silent

/kæs-[t]/ – /kæs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Castle
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “t” is silent, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “t” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/-səl/ – /ˈkæ.səl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Casual
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “s” sounds like the voiced version of the “sh” combination, the “u” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /-zhoo-əl//ˈkæ.ʒu.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Cat
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kæ[t]/ – /kæ[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Catamaran
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “a” turns into a true-schwa, the third “a” disappears, and the last “a” is short

/-duh-m’r-æn//kæ.ɾə(ʌ).mɚ.æn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Catastrophe
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is short, the second “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is long

– /kuh-TæS-chruh-fee//kə(ʌ).ˈtæs.tʃɹə(ʌ).fiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Catastrophes
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is short, the second “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is long, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /kuh-TæS-chruh-feez//kə(ʌ).ˈtæs.tʃɹə(ʌ).fiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Catastrophic
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” is short, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kæ-duhs-CHRAH-fihk//kæ.tə(ʌ)s.ˈtʃɹɑ.fə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Catch
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “e”, and the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/kə-ch/ – /kə.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable –

 

Catchy
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “e”, the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/KEH-chee//ˈkɛ.tʃiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Categorize
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “o” is long, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/Kæ-dih-gohr-aiz//ˈkæ.ɾih.goɹ.aiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Category
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, and for “-ory” suffix – the “o” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /-də-gohr-ee//ˈkæ.ɾə.goɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Cater
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAY-d’r/ – /ˈke.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Catering
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAY-d’r-ing/ – /ˈke.ɾɚ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Catholic
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “th” is un-voiced, the “o” disappears, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KæTH-lihk/ – /ˈkæθ.lə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Catholicism
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “th” is un-voiced, the “o” is short, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “c” is soft (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kə-THAH-lih-sih-zəm/ – /kə.ˈθɑ.lə(ɪ).sə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Cats
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kæ-ts/ – /kæ.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a separate syllable –

 

Caucasian
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the second “c” is hard, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, and for the “-sian” suffix, the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/kaw-KAY-zhihn//kɑ.ˈke.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Caught
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “augh” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kaw[t]/ – /kɔ[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Cause
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

– /kawz//kɔz/

 

Caused
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /kawz-[d]//kɔz.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Causes
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “s” sounds like the letter “z”, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /KAW-zihz//ˈkɔ.zə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Cautious
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and for the “-tious” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAW-shihs//ˈkɔ.ʃə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Caveat
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” is short, the “e” is long, the second is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/-vee-ah[t]//ˈkæ.viː.ɑ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Cb

 

Cc

 

 

( American English Pronunciation – Letter C ) –


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