– American English Pronunciation–

– ( Letter C:  Ch ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Ch

 

Ca . Ce . Ci . Cl . Coa-Col . Com . Con . Coo-Coz . Cr . Cu . Cy

 

Chain
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/chayn/ – /tʃeiːn/

 

Chained
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/chayn-[d]/ – /tʃeiːn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Chair
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it)

/chay-‘r/ – /tʃeɪ.ɚ/ – Notice also that the “r” acts as a second syllable –

 

Chairman
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-man” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/CHAYR-mihn/ – /ˈtʃeɪɹ.mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Chairwoman
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/CHAY-r-wə-mihn/ – /tʃeɪɹ.wə.mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Challenge
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ll” is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /CHæ-lihn-dʒ/ – /ˈtʃæ.lə(ɪ)n.dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Challenges
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ll” is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/CHæ-lihn-dʒihz//ˈtʃæ.lə(ɪ)n.dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Challenging
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ll” is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /CHæ-lihn-dʒing/ – /ˈtʃæ.lə(ɪ)n.dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Chamber
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHAYM-b’r/ – /tʃeiːm.bɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Champion
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/CHæM-pee-yihn/ – /ˈtʃæm.piː.jə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Chance
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /chæn-s//tʃæn.s/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable –

 

Change
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/chayn-dʒ/ – /cheiːn.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Changeable
.– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, the first “e” is silent, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHAYN-dʒuh-bəl/ – /ˈcheiːn.dʒə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Changed
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and since the root word ends with the sound of the soft “g”, – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and even though, according to the rules for the “-ed” ending, the “d” should be pronounced like the letter “d”, in this word, (because of the “dʒ” sound) the “d” sounds like the letter “t” but is (sometimes) stopped

– /CHAYN-dʒ-[t]//tʃeiːndʒ.[t]/ – Notice that the the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as third syllable

 

Changes
.– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and for the “-es” ending – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/CHAYN-dʒihz/ – /cheiːn.dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Changing
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHAYN-dʒing/ – /tʃeiːn.dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Channel
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” turns into a true-schwa

/CHæ-nəl/ – /ˈtʃæ.nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Chaos
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “a” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “o” is short

– /KAY-yahs//ˈkeiː.jɑs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Chaotically
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “a” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “o” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kay-YAH-dihk-lee/ – /keiː.jɑ.ɾɪ(ə)k.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Chapter
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, and the “e” disappears

/CHæ[P]-t’r//ˈtʃæ[p].tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Character
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KAYR-ih[k]-t’r//ˈkeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)[k].tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Characterized
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final is (often) stopped

– /KAYR-ih[k]-t’r//ˈkeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)[k].tɚ.aiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Characters
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /KAYR-ih[k]-t’r-z//ˈkeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)[k].tɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Characteristic
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kayr-ih[k]-t’r-IHS-tih[k]//ˌkeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)[k].tɚ.ˈɪs.tɪ[k]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

 

Characteristics
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but  is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kayr-ih[k]-t’r-IHS-tih-ks//ˌkeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)[k].tɚ.ˈɪs.tə(ɪ).ks/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable, that the major stress is on the fourth syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a sixth syllable –

 

Charge
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is soft and the “e” is silent

– /chahr-dʒ//tʃɑɹ.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable –

 

Charges
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /CHAHR-dʒihz//ˈtʃɑɹ.dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Charismatic
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/chayr-iz--dih[k]//ˌkeɪɹ.ɪz.ˈmæ.ɾə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Charitable
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /CHAYR-ih-də-bəl/ – /ˈtʃeɪɹ.ɪ.ɾə.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Charity
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /CHAYR-ih-dee//tʃeɪɹ.ɪ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Chart
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/chahr-[t]//tʃɑɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Chartered
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the first “e” disappears, and since the root-word ends with the letter “r”– the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/CHAHR-t’r-[d]//ˈtʃɑɹ.tɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Chase
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/chays//tʃeiːs/

 

Chat
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/chæ-[t]//tʃæ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Cheap
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/chee[p]//tʃiː[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Cheapest
.– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHEE-pihs-[t]//ˈtʃiː.pə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Cheaply
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHEEP-lee//ˈtʃiːp.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Cheat
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/chee-[t]//tʃiː.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Cheating
 – For this word the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /CHEE-ding/ – /tʃiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Check
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/cheh-k//tʃɛ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Checked
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tonguebut is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/cheh[k]-t//tʃɛ[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Cheek
.– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/cheek//tʃiːk/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Cheerful
.– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHEER-fəl//ˈtʃiːɹ.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Cheese
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/cheez//tʃiːz/

 

Chef
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, and the “e” is short

/shehf/ – /ʃɛf/ –

 

Chemical
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced simply like the hard letter “c”, the “e” is short, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KEH-mih-kəl//ˈkɛ.miː.kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Chemist
.– For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “e” is short, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KEH-mihs-[t]/ – /ˈkɛ.mə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Chemistry
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “e” is short, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/KEH-mihs-chree//ˈkɛ.mə(ɪ)s.tʃɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Cherry
 – For this word, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/CHAYR-ee//ˈtʃeɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Cherokee
 – For this tribal name, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/CHAYR-uh-kee//ˈtʃeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).kiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Chest
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/cheh-s[t]//tʃɛ.s[t]/ – Notice also that the “st” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Chew
 – For this word, the “ew” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/choo//tʃu/

 

Chicago
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounce like the “sh” combination, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is hard, and the final “o” is long

/shih-KAH-go/ – /ʃə(ɪ).ˈkɑ.go/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Chicken
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHIH-kihn//tʃɪ.kə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Chief
 – For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/cheef//tʃiːf/

 

Child
 – For this word, the “i” is long, there is a phatom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “l”, and there is a phantom-schwa between the phantom consonant “y” and the letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /CHAI-yəl-[d]//ˈtʃaiː.jəl.[d]/Notice that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Childhood
 – For this word, For this word, the “i” is long, there is a phatom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “l”, and there is a phantom-schwa between the phantom consonant “y” and the letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “d” is a flap-d but is almost stopped, the “h” is pronounced, the “oo” combination tuns into a true-schwa (like in the word “foot” or “put”), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/CHAI-yəl[d]-hə[d]//ˈtʃaiː.jəl.[ɾ].hə[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Children
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHIHL-dʒrihn//ˈtʃɪl.dʒɹə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Chile
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

– /CHEE-lay//ˈtʃiː.leiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Chilean
 – For this word, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “y” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/chih-LAY-yihn//tʃə(ɪ).ˈleiː.jə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Chin
 – For this word, the “i” is short

/chihn//tʃɪn/

 

China
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the “a” turns into a u-schwa

– /CHAI-nuh//ˈtʃaiː.nə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Chinese
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the first “e” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/chai-NEEZ/ – /tʃaiː.ˈniːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Chip
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/chih[p]//tʃɪ[p]/

 

Chirp
 – For this word, the “i” disappears, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/ch’r-[p]/ – /tʃɚ.[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Chivalrous
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “i” is short, for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SHIH-vəl-rəs//ˈʃɪ.vəl.ɹə(ʌ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Chivalry
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “i” is short, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” sounds like the long letter “e”

– /SHIH-vəl-ree//ˈʃɪ.vəl.ɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Chocked
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) but is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/CHAH[K]-t//ˈtʃɑ[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Chocolate
 – For this word, the first “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “c” is hard, the second “o” disappears, the “a” sounds like the short letter “i”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /CHAWK-lih[t]//ˈtʃɔk.lɪ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Chocolatier
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “c” is hard, the second “o” disappears, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, and the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /chawk-lih-TEER//tʃɔ.klɪ.ˈtiːɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Choice
 – For this word, the “oi” is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “c” is soft, and the “e” ending is silent

/choy-s//tʃoiː.s/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Choir
 – For this word, the “ch” combination is pronounced like the letter “k”, there is a phantom “w” in between the “h” and the “o”, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and there is a phantom consonant in-between the “oi” combination and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)

/KWIGH-yr/ – /ˈkwʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Choose
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/choo-z//tʃu.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Choosing
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHOO-zing//ˈtʃu.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress in on the first syllable

 

Chop
 – For this word, the “o” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/chah-[p]//tʃɑ.[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Chop Suey
 – For the name of this Pseudo-Chinese dish, the “o” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped, the “ue” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the “y” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /chah[p]-SOO-ee//tʃɑ[p].ˈsu.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Choral
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “o” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KOHR-əl//ˈkoɹ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Chord
 – For this word, the “ch” combination is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “o” is long, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /kohr[d]//koɹ[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Chords
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “o” is long, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/kohr-dz//koɹ.dz/ – Notice also that the “dz” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Chose
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/chohz//tʃoz/

 

Chosen
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHOH-zihn//ˈtʃo.zə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Christmas
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “i” is short, the “t” is silent, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/KRIHS-mihs//ˈkɹɪs.m(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Chucking
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHUH-king//ˈtʃʌ.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Church
 – For this word, the “u” disappears

/ch’r-ch//tʃɚ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Churches
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced (almost) like the letter “z”

/CH’R-chihz//ˈtʃɚ.tʃə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Churn
 – For this word, the “u” disappears

– /ch’r-n//tʃɚ.n/ – Notice also that the “n” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Chute
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced like the “Sh” combination, the “u” is long, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/shoo-[t]/ – /ʃu.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

 

( American English Pronunciation – Letter C ) –


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