– American English Pronunciation–

– ( Letter C:  Coa ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

Cc

 

Ca . Ce . Ch . Ci . Cl . Com . Con . Coo-Coz . Cr . Cu . Cy

 

Coach
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /koh-ch/ – /ko.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Coal
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /kohl//kol/

 

Coals
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /kohl-z//kol.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Coarse
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/kohr-s/ – /koɹ.s/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Coast
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kohs-[t]//kos.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Coasting
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KOHS-ding//ˈkos.dɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Coat
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/koh-[t]//ko.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Cockroach
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” but is almost stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/KAH-[k]-roh-ch//ˈkɑ.[k].ɹotʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ck” combination and the “ch” combination act as separate syllables –

 

Code
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/koh-[d]//ko.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that –

 

Codified
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is long, the “e” of the “-ed” is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/KOH-dih-fai[d]//ˈko.ɾə(ɪ).faiːɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Coffee
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/KAW-fee//ˈkɔ.fiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Coffin
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f”, and the “i” is an i-schwa

/KAW-fihn//ˈkɔ.fə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Cognition
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the first “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kah[g]-NIH-shihn//Kɑg.ˈnɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Cognitive
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the first “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAH[G]-nih-tihv//ˈkɑ[g].nə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Cohabitating
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the first “a” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/koh--bih-TAY-ding//ko.ˌhæ.bə(ɪ).ˈte.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Cohabitation
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the first “a” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/koh--bih-TAY-shihn//ko.ˌhæ.bə(ɪ).ˈte.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Coherence
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the first “e” is long, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/koh-HEER-ihn-s//ko.ˈhiːɹ.ə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Coherent
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the first “e” is long, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/koh-HEER-ihn-[t]//ko.ˈhiːɹ.ə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Cohesive
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the “e” is long, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/koh-HEE-sihv//ko.ˈhiː.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Coin
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination  (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/koyn//koiːn/

 

Coin-Purse
 – This compound word is pronounced is as two separate words – The “C” is hard, and the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination  (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/KOYN-p’rs//ˈkoiːn.pɚs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Coincidence (co-Incidence)
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, there is a phantom “w” in-between the “o” and the “I” (this is simply a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “I” is short, the second “c” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/koh-WIHN-sih-dihns//ko.ˈwɪn.sə(ɪ).də(ɪ)ns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Cold
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /kohl-[d]/ – /kol.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the flap-d ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Coldest
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kohl-dihs-[t]/ – /kol.[ɾə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

 

Collaborate (verb)
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “a” is short, the second “o” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kə--b’r-ay[t]//kə.ˈlæ.bɚ.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Collaborative
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is short, the second “o” disappears, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kə--bruh-tihv//kə.ˈlæ.brə(ʌ).tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Collaborators
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is short, the second “o” disappears, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “o” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/kə--b’r-ay-d’r-z/ – /kə.ˈlæ.bɚ.eiː.ɾɚ.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a sixth syllable

 

Collapse
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is short, and the final “e” is silent

/k’--ps//k’.ˈlæ.ps/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ps” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Collateral
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-tthe “e” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kuh--d’r-əl//kə(ʌ).ˈlæ.ɾɚ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Colleague
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, and the “eu” is silent

– /KAH-lee[g]//ˈkɑ.liː[g]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “g” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Colleagues/’s
 – For this word (plural or possessive), the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “g” is hard, the “eu” combination disappears, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /KAH-lee-gz//ˈkɑ.liː.gz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “gz” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Collect
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the second “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped

/k’-LEH[K]-t//k’.ˈlɛ[k].t/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Collected
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the second “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/k’-LEH[K]-dih[d]//k’.ˈlɛ[k].də(ɪ)[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Collection
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the second “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/k’-LEH[K]-shihn//k’.ˈlɛ[k].ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

College
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /KAH-lih-dʒ//ˈkɑ.lə(ɪ).dʒ/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Collided
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l”, the “i” is long, the first “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/kuh-LAI-dih[d]//kə(ʌ).ˈlaiː.ɾə(ɪ)ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Collocation
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” is long, the second “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kah-luh-KAY-shihn//ˌkɑ.lo.ˈkeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Cologne
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” disappears, the second “o” is long, the “g” is silent, and the final “e” is silent

/k’-LOHN//k.ˈlon/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Colon
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is long, and the second “o” turns into an i-schwa

– /KOH-lihn//ˈkol.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Color
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the second “o” disappears

/KUH-l’r//ˈkʌ.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Colored
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the second “o” disappears, and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/KUH-l’r-[d]//ˈkʌ.lɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the flap-d ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

 

Colorado
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “o” is long

– /kaw-lə-RAH-doh//kɔ.lə.ˈɹɑ.ɾo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable 

 

Column
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “n” is silent

/KAH-ləm//ˈkɑ.ləm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Columbine
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is a u-schwa, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/KAH-luhm-bain//ˈkɑ.lə(ʌ)m.baiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

( American English Pronunciation – Letter C ) –


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