– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter C:  Com ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue — a.k.a. — American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in The English Language, with more words added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of The English Language — both world-wide, and through-out America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Com

 

Ca . Ce . Ch . Ci . Cl . Coa-Col . Con . Coo-Coz . Cr . Cu . Cy

 

 

Combination
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, , and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahm-bih-NAY-shihn//kɑm.bə(ɪ).ˈneiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Combine (noun)
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/KAHM-bain//ˈkɑm.baiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Combine (verb)
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/kuhm-BAIN//kə(ʌ)mˈbaiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Combined
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “n”– the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /kuhm-BAIN-[d]//kə(ʌ)m.ˈbaiːn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Combining
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kuhm-BAI-ning//kə(ʌ)m.ˈbaɪn.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Come
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the final “e” is silent

/kuhm//kʌm/ –

 

Comedian
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ian” suffix – the “i” (converted from the letter “y” of the root-word) is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kuh-MEE-dee-ihn//kə(ʌ).ˈmiː.ɾiː.ə(ɪ)n/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Comedians
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ian” suffix – the “i” (converted from the letter “y” of the root-word) is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /kuh-MEE-dee-ihn-z//kə(ʌ).ˈmiː.ɾiː.ə(ɪ)n.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Comedy
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, and the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “y”

/KAH-mih-dee//ˈkɑ.mə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Comfort
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the second “o” disappears, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/KUHM-f’r-[t]//ˈkʌm.fɚ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

 

Comfortable
 – This word is pronounced in many different ways by many different people but the most common way is as follows:  The “C” is hard, the “first “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the second “o” disappears, the the “t” and “r” trade places, the “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, the “a” disappears, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” is silent

– /KUHM-f-d’r-bəl//ˈkʌm.f.dɚ.bəl/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Comfortably
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the second “o” disappears, the the “t” and “r” trade places, the “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, the “a” disappears, and for the “-ably” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KUHM-f-d’r-blee//ˈkʌm.f.dɚ.bliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Comforter
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the second “o” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-er” suffixthe “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KUHM-f’r-d’r//ˈkʌm.fɚ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Coming
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KUH-ming//ˈkʌ.mɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Command
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is short, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/kuh-MæN-[d]//kə(ʌ).ˈmæn.[d]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Commend
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

– /kuh-MEHN-[d]//kə(ʌ).ˈmɛn.[d]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Comment
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /KAH-mehn-[t]//ˈkɑ.mɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

 

Comments
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” is short

– /KAH-mehn-ts//ˈkɑ.mɛn.ts/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Commercial
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” disappears, and for the “-cial” suffix – the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kuh-M’R-shəl//kə(ʌ).ˈmɚ.ʃəl/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Commission
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is short, the “ssi” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/kuh-MIH-shihn//kʌ.ˈmɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Commissioned
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is short, the “ssi” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/kuh-MIH-shihn-[d]//kʌ.ˈmɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

 

Commit
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/kuh-MIH[T]//kə(ʌ).ˈmɪ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Commitment
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kuh-MIH[T]-mihn-[t]//kə(ʌ).ˈmɪ[t].mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Committed
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/kuh-MIH-dih[d]//kə(ʌ).ˈmɪ.ɾə(ɪ)ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Committee
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like a single “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, the “tt” is pronounced simply like the single flap-t  (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /kuh-MIH-dee//kə(ʌ).ˈmɪ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Commodities
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/kuh-MAH-dih-teez//kə(ʌ)ˈmɑ.ɾə(ɪ).tiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Common
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the second “o” turns into an i-schwa

– /KAH-mihn//ˈkɑ.mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Commonly
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KAH-mihn-lee//ˈkɑ.mə(ɪ)n.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Communicate
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffixthe “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kə-MYOO-nih-kay-[t]//kə.ˈmju.nə(ɪ).ke.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable –

 

Communication
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kuh-myou-nih-KAY-shuhn//kʌ.ˌmju.nɪ.ˈkeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Communion
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is pronounced like the consonant form of the letter “y”, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

– /kuh-MYOON-yihn/ – /kə(ʌ).ˈmjun.jə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Community
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kuh-MYOO-nih-dee/ – /kə(ʌ).ˈmju.nə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Commute
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/kuh-MYOO-[t]/ – /kə(ʌ).mju.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

 

Commuter
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-er” suffixthe “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kuh-MYOO-d’r/ – /kə(ʌ).mju.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Comparing
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “a” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kuhm-PAYR-ing//kə(ʌ)m.ˈpeɪɹ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Companies
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /KUHM-pə-neez/ – /ˈkʌm.pə.niːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Companion
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “a” is short, the “i” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y”, and the second “o” turns into an i-schwa

/kuhm-PæN-yihn//kə(ʌ)mˈpæn.jə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Company
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /KUHM-pə-nee//ˈkʌm.pə.niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Compare
 – For this word, the “C” is hard,the “o” turns into a u-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

– /kuhm-PAYR//kʌm.ˈpeɪɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Compared
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending, is silent and the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/kuhm-PAYR-[d]/ – /kə(ʌ)m.ˈpeɪɹ.[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Comparison
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” turns into a true-schwa, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/kuhm-PAYR-ə-sihn//kə(ʌ)m.ˈpeɪɹ.ə.sə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Compass
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/KUHM-pihs//ˈkʌm.pə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Compatible
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ible” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kəm--dih-bəl/ – /kəm.ˈpæ.ɾə(ɪ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Compatibility
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the first “i” turns into a true-schwa, the second letter “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kəm--də-BIH-lih-dee//kəm.ˌpæ.ɾə.bɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable 

 

Compel
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the “e” is short

/kəm-PEHL//kəm.ˈpɛl/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Compelled
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “e” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

/kəm-PEHL-[d]//kəm.ˈpɛl.[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Compensate
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffixthe “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAHM-pihn-say-[t]/ – /ˈkɑm.pə(ɪ)n.se.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable 

 

Compensation
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahm-pihn-SAY-shihn/ – /ˌkɑm.pə(ɪ)n.ˈseiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Compete
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “e” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/kəm-PEE[T]//kəm.ˈpiː.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Competence
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAHM-pə-tihn-s//kəm.ˈpiː.tə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

 

Competing
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kəm-PEE-ding/ – /kəm.ˈpiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Competition
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kahm-pə-TIH-shən//kɑm.pə.tɪ.ʃən/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Competitive
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the first “t” is a flap-t, the “i” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kəm-PEH-də-tihv/ – /kəm.ˈpɛ.ɾə.ɾə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Competitors
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-or” suffixthe “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /kəm-PEH-də-t’r-z//kəm.ˈpɛ.ɾə.tɚ.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Competitor
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-or” suffixthe “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kəm-PEH-də-t’r-z//kəm.ˈpɛ.ɾə.tɚ.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Compile
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant “y” & phantom-schwa combination in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)

/kəm-PAI-yəl/ – /kəm.paiː.jəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Compiling
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant “y” & phantom-schwa combination in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kəm-PAI-yəl-ing/ – /kəm.paiː.jəl.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Complacent
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is
(often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kəm-PLAY-sihn-[t]//kəm.ˈpleiː.sə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Complain
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

/kəm-PLAYN//kəm.ˈpleiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Complaint
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwathe “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /kəm-PLAYN-[t]//kəm.pleiːn.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Complaints
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwathe “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

– /kəm-PLAYN-ts/ – /kəm.pleiːn.ts/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Complementary
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahm-plə-MEHN-tə-ree//ˌkɑm.plə.ˈmɛn.tə.ɹiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable  –

 

Complete
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “e” is long, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/kəm-PLEE[T]//kəm.ˈpliː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Completed
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “e” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /kəm-PLEE-dih[d]//kəm.pliː.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Completely
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “e” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the second “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kəm-PLEE[T]-lee//kəm.pliː[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Completing
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kəm-PLEE-ding//kəm.ˈpliː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Completion
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kəm-PLEE-shihn//kəm.ˈpliː.ʃə(ɪ)n / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Complex (adjective)
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, and the final “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/kəm-PLEH-ks//kəm.ˈplɛ.ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Complex (noun)
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” is short, and the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

– /KAHM-plehks//ˈkɑm.plɛks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Complexion
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “xi” combination is pronounced like a “ksh” combination, and the second “o” turns into an i-schwa

/kəm-PLEHK-shihn//kəm.ˈplɛk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Compliance
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kəm-PLAI-ihn-s//kəm.ˈplaiː.ə(ɪ)n.s/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Complicate
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffixthe “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAHM-plih-kay-[t]//ˈkɑm.plə(ɪ).ke[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable 

 

Complicated
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffixthe “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” (pronounced as a flap-t) – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /KAHM-plih-kay-dih[d]//ˈkɑm.plə(ɪ).ke.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Complicity
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the second “c” is soft, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kəm-PLIH-sih-dee/ – /kəm.ˈplə(ɪ).sə(ɪ).ɾiː/– Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Compliment
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa,, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAHM-plih-mihn-[t]/ – /ˈkɑm.plə(ɪ).mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable 

 

Complimentary
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, and for the “-ary” suffixthe “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kom-plih-MEHN-tə-ree//kɑm.plə(ɪ).ˈmɛn.tə.ɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Component
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is long, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kəm-POH-nihn-[t]//kəm.ˈpo.nə(ɪ)n.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Composed
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” is silent and the “d” is (often) stopped

– /kəm-POHZ-[d]/ – /kəm.ˈpoz.[d]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Composers
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is long, the fist “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, for the “-er” suffixthe “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” also is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /kəm-POH-z’r-z//kəm.ˈpo.zɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Comprehend
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, the second “e” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/kahm-prih-HEHN-[d]//kɑm.pɹə(ɪ).ˈhɛn.[d]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Comprehension
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, the second “e” is short, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kahm-prih-HEHN-shuhn//kɑm.pɹə(ɪ).ˈhɛn.ʃə(ʌ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Comprehensive
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, the second “e” is short, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahm-prih-HEHN-sihv//kɑm.pɹə(ɪ).ˈhɛn.sɪv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Compromise
 – For this word, the “C” is hard,  the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

– /KAHM-prih-maiz//ˈkɑm.pɹə(ɪ).maiːz/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Compromised
 – For this word, the “C” is hard,  the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” is silent

– /KAHM-prih-maiz-d//ˈkɑm.pɹə(ɪ).maiːz.d/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Compromising
 – For this word, the “C” is hard,  the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KAHM-prih-mai-zing//ˈkɑm.pɹə(ɪ).maiː.zɪŋ/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Compulsory
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is short, and for “-ory” suffixthe “o” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the common pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kəm-PUHL-s’r-ee//kəm.ˈpʌl.sɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Computer
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-er” suffixthe “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kəm-PYOO-d’r//kəm.pju.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Computerized
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – and the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

– /kəm-PYOO-d’r-aiz[d]/ – /kəm.ˈpju.ɾɚ.aiːz[d]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

( American English PronunciationLetter C ) –


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