– American English Pronunciation–

– ( Letter C:  Con ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.


Cc

 

Ca – Cc . Cd – Cf . Cg – Ci . Cj – Cl . Cm – Col . ComConb . Conc . Cond . Cone . Conf . Cong . Conh . Coni . Conj . Conk . Conl . Conm . Conn . Conp . Conq . Conr . Cons . Cont . Conu . Conv . Conw . Conx . Cony . Conz . Coo – CozCp – Cr . Cs – Cu . Cv –Cz

 

Conb

 

Conc

 

Conceive
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “c” is soft, the “ei” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “e” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/kən-SEEV//kən.ˈsiːv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Concentrate
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the second “c” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KAHN-sihn-chray[t]//ˈkɑn.sə(ɪ)n.tʃɹe[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Concentration
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, and the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahn-sihn-CHRAY-shihn//ˌkɑn.sə(ɪ)n.ˈtʃɹeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Concept
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the second “c” is soft, the “e” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped, and the “t” is (often) stopped

/KAHN-seh[p]-[t]//ˈkɑn.sɛ[p].[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Concern
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “c” is soft, and the “e” disappears

– /kuhn-S’RN//kə(ʌ)n.sɚn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Concerned
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “c” is soft, the first “e” disappears, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

– /kən-S’RN-[d]//kən.ˈsɚn.[d]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Concerning
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “c” is soft, the “e” disappears, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-S’RN-ing//kən.ˈsɚn.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Concerns
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “c” is soft, the “e” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /kən-S’RN-z//kən.ˈsɚn.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Concert
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the second “c” is soft, the “e” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/KAHN-s’r-[t]//ˈkɑn.sɚ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

 

Concerto
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “c” is pronounced like the “ch” combination, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “o” is long

– /kən-CHAYR-toh//kən.ˈtʃeɪɹ.to/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Concertos
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “c” is pronounced like the “ch” combination, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the final “o” is long, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/kən-CHAYR-tohz/ – /kən.tʃeɪɹ.toz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Concise
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/kən-SIGHS//kən.ˈsʌiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Conclude
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “c” is hard, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/kən-KOO[D]/ – /kən.ˈklu[ɾ]–Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Concluded
 – For this word, The “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “c” is also hard, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /kuhn-KLOO-dih[d]//kʌn.ˈklu.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Conclusion
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “c” is hard, the “u” is long, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kuhn-KLOO-zhihn//kə(ʌ)n.ˈklu.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Concrete
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the second “c” is hard, the first “e” is long, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/KAHN-kree[t]//ˈkɑn.kriː.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Cond

 

Condemn
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, and the final “n” is silent

/kən-DEHM//kən.ˈdɛm/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Condemned
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “n” is silent, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “m”, the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/kən-DEHM-d//kən.ˈdɛm.d/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Condense
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “e” is short, and the second “e” is silent

/kən-DEHN-s/ – /kən.ˈdɛn.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Condensed
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “e” is short, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/kən-DEHN-s[t]/ – /kən.ˈdɛn.s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “st” ending (even when the “t” is stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Condition
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kən-DIH-shihn//kən.ˈdɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable 

 

Conditional
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kən-DIH-shih-nəl//kən.ˈdɪ.ʃə(ɪ).nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable 

 

Conditions
 – For this word, The “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /kən-DIH-shin-z//kən.dɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Conducive
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, the second “c” is soft, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kən-DOO-sihv//kən.ˈdu.sɪv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable 

 

Conduct (noun)
 For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “u” is a u-schwa, the second “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped

/KAHN-duh[k]-t/ – /ˈkɑn.də(ʌ)[k].t/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Conduct (verb)
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is short, the second “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped

/kən-DUH[K]-t//kənˈdʌ[k].t/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Conducted
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is short, the second “c” is hard, the “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t”, the “e” of the -ed ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /kən-DUHK-tih[d]//kən.ˈdʌk.tɪ[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Cone

 

Conf

 

Conference
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KAHN-frihn-s//ˈkɑn.fɹə(ʌ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable 

 

Conferences
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the first “e” disappears, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /KAHN-frihn-sih-z//ˈkɑn.fɹə(ɪ)n.sə(ɪ).z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable 

 

Confidence
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KAHN-fih-dihn-[t]//ˈkɑn.fə(ɪ).ɾə(ɪ)n.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Confident
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KAHN-fih-dihn-[t]//ˈkɑn.fə(ɪ).ɾə(ɪ)n.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Confidently
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KAHN-fih-dihn-[t]-lee//ˈkɑn.fə(ɪ).ɾə(ɪ)n.[t].liː/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Configure
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “g” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y”, and the final “e” is silent

/kən-FIHG-y’r/ – /kən.ˈfɪg.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable 

 

Configured
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “g” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

/kən-FIHG-y’r-[d]/ – /kən.ˈfɪg.jɚ.[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Confine
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/kən-FAIN//kən.ˈfaiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable 

 

Confined
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/kən-FAIN-d//kən.ˈfaiːn.d/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Confirm
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the “i” disappears

– /kən-F’RM//kən.ˈfɚm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable 

 

Confirmation
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “i” disappears, the “a” is Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahn-f’r-MAY-shihn//kɑn.fɚ.ˈmeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Conflict
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/KAHN-flih-[k]t//ˈkɑn.flə(ɪ).[k]t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Conform
 
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the second “o” is long

/kən-FOHRM//kən.ˈfoɹm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Confront
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kən-FRUHN-[t]//kənˈfɹʌn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Confrontation
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahn-frihn-TAY-shihn//kɑn.fɹə(ɪ)n.ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

 

Confucianism
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a i-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “You”, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kihn-FYOO-shihn-ih-zəm//kə(ɪ)n.ˈfju.ʃə(ɪ)n.ə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Confuse
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/kən-FYOOZ//kənˈfjuz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable 

 

Confused
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /kən-FYOUZ-[d]//kən.ˈfjuz.[d]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Confusing
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-FYOO-zing//kən.fju.ˈzɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable 

 

Confusion
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-FYOO-zhihn//kən.ˈfju.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable 

 

Cong

 

Congestion
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is soft, the “e” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “ch” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-dʒEHS-chihn//kən.dʒɛs.tʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable 

 

Conglomeration
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” disappears, the “a” is Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-glah-m’r-AY-shihn//kən.ˌglɑ.mɚ.eiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable 

 

Congratulate
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the first “a” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is an example of an adaptation of common usage rather than a “rule” of pronunciation), the “u” turns into a true-schwa, a, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-GRæ-dʒə-lay[t]//kən.ˈgɹæ.dʒə.le[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable 

 

Congratulations
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the first “a” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is an example of an adaptation of common usage rather than a “rule” of pronunciation), the “u” turns into a true-schwathe second “a” is Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/kən-græ-dʒu-LAY-shihn-z//kən.gɹæ.dʒuˈleiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable, the major stress is on the fourth syllable, and that the “s” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Congress
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short,  the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination, and for the “-gress” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAHNG-grihs//ˈkɑŋ.gɹə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Conh

 

Coni

 

Conj

 

Conjugation
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g”, the “u” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahn-dʒih-GAY-shihn//kɑn.dʒə(ɪ).ˈgeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Conjunction
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “u” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the hard letter “c” directly after it), the second “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

–  /kən-dʒUHNG[k]-shihn/ –  /kən.ˈdʒʌŋ.[k].ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Conjunctivitis
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “u” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the hard letter “c” directly after it), the first “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-itis” suffix – the first “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and the second “i” is an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

–  /kən-dʒuhnk-tih-VIHG-dihs/ –  /kən.ˌdʒʌŋk.tə(ɪ).ˈvʌiː.ɾə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the major stress is on the fourth syllable, and that the minor stress is on the second syllable –

 

Conjugate
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAHN-dʒə-gay[t]//ˈkɑn.dʒə.ge[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Conk

 

Conl

 

Conm

 

Conn

 

Connect
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the second “c” is hard but is almost stopped

/kə-NEH[K]-t//kə.ˈnɛ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Connected
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the second “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, and since the root-word ends in the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /kə-NEH[K]-dih-[d]//kə.ˈnɛ[k].də(ɪ).[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Connecticut
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the second “c” is silent, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa the third “c” is hard, the “u” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kə-NEH-dih-kih-[t]/ – /kə.ˈnɛ.ɾə(ɪ).kə(ɪ)[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

 

Connecting
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the second “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kə-NEH[K]-ting//kə.ˈnɛ[k].tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Connection
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the second “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kə-NEHK-shihn//kə.ˈnɛk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Conniving
 – For this word, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kə-NAI-ving//kə.ˈnaiː.vɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Cono

 

Conp

 

Conq

 

Conr

 

Cons

 

Conscience
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “sc” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “ie” combination turns into an i-schwa, the second “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/KAHN-shihn-s//ˈkɑn.ʃə(ɪ)n.s/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Conscientious
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “sc” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “e” is short, and for the “-tious” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahn-shee-EHN-shihs//kɑn.ʃiː.ˈɛn.ʃə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Conscious
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “sci” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KAHN-shihs//ˈkɑn.ʃə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Consciousness
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “sci” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns  into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KAHN-shihs-nihs//ˈkɑn.ʃə(ɪ)s.nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Consensus
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, and the “u” turns into an i-schwa

– /kən-SEHN-sihs//kən.sɛn.sə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Consequence
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAHN-sih-kwehn-s//ˈkɑn.sə(ɪ).kwə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable 

 

Consequences
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/KAHN-sih-kwehn-sihz/ – /ˈkɑn.sə(ɪ).kwɛn.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Consequently
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the third “e” is short, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAHN-sih-kwehn-[t]-lee//ˈkɑn.sə(ɪ).kwə(ɪ)n.[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Conservative
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “e” disappears, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-S’R-vuh-dihv//kən.ˈsɚ.və(ʌ).ɾə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Conservation
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” disappears, the “a” is Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahn-s’r-VAY-shihn/ – /kɑn.sɚ.ˈveiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Conservationism
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” disappearsthe “a” is Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kahn-s’r-VAY-shihn-ih-zəm/ – /ˌkɑn.sɚ.ˈveiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.ə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress is on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

 

Conservationist
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” disappears, the “a” is Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kahn-s’r-VAY-shihn-ihs-[t]/ – /ˌkɑn.sɚ.ˈveiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.ə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a sixth syllable

 

Conserve
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwathe first “e” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/kən-S’RV/ – /kən.ˈsɚv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Conservatism
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwathe first “e” disappears, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kən-S’R-vuh-tih-zəm/ – /kən.ˈsɚ.və(ʌ).tə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Conservative
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwathe first “e” disappears, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kən-S’R-vuh-tihv/ – /kən.ˈsɚ.və(ʌ).ɾə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Conservatively
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwathe first “e” disappears, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /kən-S’R-vuh-tihv-lee/ – /kən.ˈsɚ.və(ʌ).ɾə(ɪ)v.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Consider
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-SIH-d’r//kən.ˈsɪ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Considerable
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-SIH-d’r-uh-bəl//kən.ˈsɪ.ɾɚ.ə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Considerably
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ably” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-SIH-d’r-uh-blee//kən.ˈsɪ.ɾɚ.ə(ʌ).bliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Consideration
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “a” is Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-sih-d’r-AY-shihn//kən.ˌsɪ.ɾɚ.ˈeiːʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Considerations
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)the “a” is Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/kən-sih-d’r-AY-shihn-z//kən.ˌsɪ.ɾɚ.ˈeiːʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a sixth syllable

 

Considered
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (usually) a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/kən-SIH-d’r-d/ – /kən.ˈsɪ.ɾɚ.[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Consist
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-SIHS-[t]//kənˈsə(ɪ)s.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a third

 

Consolidate
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-SAH-lih-day[t]//kən.ˈsɑ.lə(ɪ).ɾe[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Constant
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAHN-stihn-[t]//ˈkɑn.stə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

 

Constantly
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KAHN-stihn-[t]-lee//ˈkɑn.stə(ɪ)n.[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Construct (noun)
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the first “t’ is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it) the “u” is a u-schwa, the second is (usually) stopped, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/KAHN-s-chruh[k]-[t]//ˈkɑn.s.tʃɹə(ʌ)[k].[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Construct (verb)
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “t’ is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it),the “u” is short, the second is (usually) stopped, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kən-s-CHRUH[K]-[t]//kən.s.ˈtʃɹ(ʌ)[k].[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Construction
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa,the first “t’ is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is short, the second “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kən-SCHRUHK-shuhn//kən.s.ˈtʃɹʌk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Constructively
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, the second “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kuhn-s-CHRUHK-tihv-lee//kə(ʌ)n.s.ˈtʃɹʌk.tɪv.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Consulate
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAHN-sə-lih[t]//ˈkɑn.sə.lə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first stress

 

Consult
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kən-SUHL-[t]//kənˈsʌl.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Consultancy
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “u” is short, and for the “-ancy” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahn-SUHL-tihn-see//kɑn.sʌl.ˈtə(ɪ)n.siː/ –Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

 

Consultants
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is short, the first “t” is (sometimes) stopped, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kən-SUHL-[t]ihn-ts//kən.ˈsʌl.[t]ə(ɪ)n.ts/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Consultation
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “u” turns into a u-schwathe “a” is Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kahn-suhl-TAY-shuhn//kɑn.sə(ʌ)l.ˈteiː.ʃə(ʌ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Consultations
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “u” turns into a true-schwathe “a” is Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /kahn-s’l-TAY-shuhn-z/ – /kɑn.səl.ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Consulting
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kuhn-SUHL-ting//kə(ʌ)n.ˈsʌl.tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Consume
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, and the final “e” is silent

– /kən-SOOM/ – /kən.ˈsum/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Consumed
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, and because the root-word ends with the letter “m” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

– /kən-SOOM-d//kən.ˈsum.d/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Consumer
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-SOO-m’r//kən.ˈsu.mɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Consumerism
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-SOO-m’r-ih-zəm//kən.ˈsu.mɚ.ə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Consumers
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/kən-SOO-m’r-z/ – /kən.ˈsu.mɚ.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable 

 

Consuming
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kən-SOO-ming/ – /kən.ˈsu.mɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Consumption
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is short, the “p” is almost silent, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-SUHM[P]-shihn//kən.ˈsʌm[p].ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Cont

 

Contact
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “a” is short, the second “c” is (usually) stopped, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/KAHN-tæ[k]-[t]//ˈkɑn.tæ[k].[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable And that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable 

 

Contagious
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwathe “a” is Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and the “iou” combination turns into an i-schwa

– /kən-TAY-dʒihs//kən.ˈteiː.dʒə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Contain
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/kən-TAYN//kən.ˈteiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Contained
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

– /kən-TAYN-d/ – /kən.ˈeiːn.d/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Container
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-TAYN-‘r//kən.ˈeiːn.ɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Contemplating
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAHN-tihm-play-ding//ˈkɑn.tə(ɪ)m.ple.dɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Contemporary
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the second “o” disappears, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-TEHM-p’r-ayr-ee//kən.ˈtɛm.pɚ.ɹeɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Content (adjective)
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kən-TEHN-[t]//kən.ˈtɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

 

Content (noun)
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/KAHN-tehn-[t]//ˈkɑn.tɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

 

Contest (noun)
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/KAHN-tehs[t]/ – /ˈkɑn.tɛs[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Contest (verb)
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kən-TEHS-[t]/ – /kən.ˈtɛs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Contestable
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “e” is short, the second “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kuhn-TEHS-dih-bəl//kʌn.ˈtɛs.də(ɪ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Context
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/KAHN-tek-s[t]//ˈkɑn.tɛk.s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Continent
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/KAHN-tih-nehn-[t]//ˈkɑn.tə(ɪ).nə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Continents
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/KAHN-tih-nehn-ts//ˈkɑn.tə(ɪ).nə(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a separate syllable 

 

Contingency
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is short, the “g” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/kuhn-TIHN-dʒihn-see//kə(ʌ).ˈtɪn.dʒə(ɪ)n.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Continually
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-TIHN-yoo-ə-lee//kən.ˈtɪn.ju.ə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Continue
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, and the “ue” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”

/kən-TIHN-yoo//kən.ˈtɪn.ju/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Continuous
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-TIHN-yoo-ihs//kən.ˈtɪn.ju.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Continuously
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the second “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/kən-TIHN-yoo-ihs-lee/ – /kən.ˈtɪn.ju.ə(ʌ)s.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Contraceptives
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “e” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped, for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/kahn-chruh-SEH[P]-tihv-z/ – /kɑn.tʃɹə(ʌ).ˈsɛ[p].tə(ɪ)v.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

 

Contract (noun)
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, the second “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

– /KAHN-chræ[k]-t//ˈkɑn.tʃɹæ[k].t/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Contract (verb)
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, and the second “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

– /kən-CHRæ[K]-t//kən.ˈtʃɹæ[k].t/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Contrarian
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ian” suffix – the “i” (converted from the letter “y” of the root-word) is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-CHRAYR-ee-ihn/ – /kən.tʃɹeɪɹ.iː.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Contrast (noun)
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/KAHN-chræs-[t]//ˈkɑn.tʃɹæs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

 

Contrast (verb)
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kən-CHRæS-[t]//kən.ˈtʃɹæs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

 

Contrasting
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-CHRæS-ting//kən.ˈtʃɹæs.tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Contribute
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /kən-CHRIH-byou-[t]//kən.ˈtʃɹɪ.bju.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Contributed
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” if the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/kən-CHRIH-byou-tih[d]/ – /kən.ˈtʃɹɪ.bju.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Contribution
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is an i-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahn-chrih-BYOO-shihn//kɑn.tʃɹə(ɪ).ˈbju.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Contributing
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kən-CHRIH-byou-ding//kən.ˈtʃɹɪ.bju.ɾɪŋ/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Contributor
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-CHRIH-byoo-d’r//kən.ˈtʃɹɪ.bju.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Control
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the second “o” is long

– /kən-CHROHL//kən.ˈtʃɹol/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Controlled
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “o” is long, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the “l” sound – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /kən-CHROHL-[d]//kən.ˈtʃɹol.[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Controls
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “o” is long, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/kən-CHOHL-z/ – /kən.ˈtʃɹol.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable 

 

Controversial
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” disappears, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahn-chrə-V’R-see-əl/ – /kɑn.tʃɹə.ˈvɚ.siː.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Controversy
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is short, the “t” is pronounced with the “ch” sound (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “o” turns into a u-schwathe “e” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/KAHN-chruh-v’r-see/ – /ˈkɑn.tʃɹə(ʌ).vɚ.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Conu

 

Conundrum
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the first “u” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the second “u” is a u-schwa

/kuh-NUHN-dʒruhm//kə(ʌ).ˈnʌn.dʒɹə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Conv

 

Convenient
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is long, the “i” is long, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-VEEN-yihn-[t]/ – /kən.ˈviːn.jə(ɪ)n.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth

 

Conveniently
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-VEEN-yihn[t]-lee//kən.ˈviːn.jə(ɪ)n[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Convention
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-VEHN-shihn//kən.ˈvɛn.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Conventions
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced amost like the letter “z”

/kən-VEHN-shihn//kən.ˈvɛn.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Conventional
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-VEHN-shihn-əl//kən.ˈvɛn.ʃə(ɪ)n.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Conversation
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” disappears, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahn-v’r-SAY-shihn/ – /kɑn.vɚ.ˈseiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Converse
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwathe first “e” disappears, and the second “e” is silent

/kən-V’RS//kən.ˈvɚs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Conversely
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwathe first “e” disappears, the second “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-V’RS-lee//kən.ˈvɚs.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Conversion
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwathe “e” disappears, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-V’R-[t]//kən.ˈvɚ.ʒə(ɪ)n/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

 

Convert (noun)
For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/KAHN-v’r-[t]//ˈkɑn.vɚ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

 

Convert (verb)
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwathe “e” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kən-V’R-[t]//kən.ˈvɚ.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

 

Convertible
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwathe “e” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ible” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kən-V’R-dih-bəl/ – /kən.ˈvɚ.ɾə(ɪ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Converting
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwathe “e” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kən-V’R-ding/ – /kən.ˈvɚ.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Convince
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the second “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /kən-VIHNS//kən.ˈvɪns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Convinced
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the second “c” is soft, and since the “root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/kən-VIHN-st//kən.ˈvɪn.st/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable ant that the “st” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Convincing
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the second “c” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-VIHN-sing//kən.ˈvɪn.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Convincingly
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the second “c” is soft, the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-VIHN-sing-lee//kən.ˈvɪn.sɪŋ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Convoluted
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “u” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/kahn-vuh-LOO-dih[d]//kɑn.və(ʌ).ˈlu.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

 

 

( American English Pronunciation – Letter C ) –


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