– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter C:  Coo — Coz ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue — a.k.a. — American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in The English Language, with more words added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of The English Language — both world-wide, and through-out America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

Co

 

Ca . Ce . Ch . Ci . Cl . Coa-Col . Com . Con . Cr . Cu . Cy

 

 

Cook
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “oo” combination tuns into a true-schwa (like in the word “foot” or “put”)

/kə-k//kə.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Cooks
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “oo” combination tuns into a true-schwa (like in the word “foot” or “put”)

/kə-ks//kə.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Cooked
 –For this word, the “C” is hard, the “oo” combination tuns into a true-schwa (like in the word “foot” or “put”), and since the word ends in the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

– /kə[k]-t//kə[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable –

 

Cooker
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “oo” combination tuns into a true-schwa (like in the word “foot” or “put”), and for the “-er” suffixthe “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-kr//ˈkə.kɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable (also note that this is a European-English word and is almost never used in American-English or The Common Tongue.  It is always replaced by either the word “Cook” [for the person] or “Oven”/”Stove” [for the thing that one cooks with])

 

Cookie
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “oo” combination tuns into a true-schwa (like in the word “foot” or “put”), and the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/-kee//ˈkə.kiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Cooking
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “oo” combination tuns into a true-schwa (like in the word “foot” or “put”), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/Kə-king/ – /ˈkə.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Cool
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/kool//kul/

 

Cooperate
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the two letters “o” (this is a product of the transition from one vowel sound to the next), the second “o” is short, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffixthe “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kə-WAH-p’r-ay[t]//kə.ˈwɑ.pɚ.e[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third

 

Cooperation
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the letters “o” (this is a product of the transition from one vowel sound to the next), the second letter “o” is short, the “e” disappearsthe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kə-wah-p’r-AY-shihn/ – /kə.ˌwɑ.pɚ.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

 

Cooperative
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is long, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the two letters “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the second “o” is short, the “e” disappears, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/koh-WAH-prə-tihv//ko.ˈwɑ.pɹə.tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Coordinate
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the two letters “o” (this is a product of the transition from one vowel sound to the next), the second “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffixthe “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kə-WOHR-dih-nay[t]//kə.ˈwoɹ.ɾə(ɪ).ne[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Coordinated
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the two letters “o” (this is a product of the transition from one vowel sound to the next), the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” turns into an i-schwa,, and for the “-ate” suffixthe “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /kə-WOHR-dih-nay-dih-[d]//kə.ˈwoɹ.ɾə(ɪ).ne.ɾə(ɪ).[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that he “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable – 

 

Coordinator
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the two letters “o” (this is a product of the transition from one vowel sound to the next), the second “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, the “i” is an i-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-or” suffixthe “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kə-WOHR-[d]ih-nay-d’r//kə.ˈwoɹ.[ɾ]ə(ɪ).neiː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Cope
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “p” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/koh[p]//ko[p]/ –

 

Coping
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “p” is almost stopped, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KOH-ping//ˈko.pɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Copy
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “p” is almost stopped, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /KAH-pee//ˈkɑ.piː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Core
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/kohr/ – /koɹ/ –

 

Cordless
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and for the “-less” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KOHR[D]-lihs//ˈkoɹ[d].lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Corner
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, and for the “-er” suffixthe “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KOHR-n’r//koɹ.ˈnɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Cornucopia
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “u” turns into an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard, the second “o” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/kohr-nih-KOH-pee-uh/ – /koɹ.nə(ɪ).ˈko.piː.ə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Corporate
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is long, the second “o” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KOHR-prih[t]/ – /ˈkoɹ.pɹə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable 

 

Corporation
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is long, the second “o” disappears, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kohr-p’r-AY-shihn/ – /koɹ.pɚ.ˈe.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable 

 

Corps
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “p” is silent, and the “s” is silent

/kohr/ – /koɹ/ –

 

Corpse
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/kohr-ps/ – /koɹ.ps/ – Notice also that the “ps” ending acts as a second syllable –

 

Correct
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and second next “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

– /kə-REH[K]-t//kə.ˈrɛ[k].t/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Correctly
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the second “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kə-REH[K]-[t]-lee//kə.ˈrɛ[k].[t].liː/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Correspondent
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is long, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r”, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the second “o” is short, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kor-ih-SPAHN-dihn-[t]//koɹ.ə(ɪ).ˈspɑn.də(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Corrupt
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is short, and the “p” is (often) stopped

– /kə-RUH[P]-t//kə.ˈɹʌ[p].t/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Corrupted
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is short, the “p” is almost stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /kə-RUH[P]-tih[d]//kə.ˈɹʌ[p].tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Corruption
 – For this word, The “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is short, the “p” is almost stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kə-RUHP-shuhn//kə.ˈɹʌp.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Cost
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like an “aw” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /kaws-[t]/ – /kɔs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Costs
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like an “aw” combination

– /kaws-ts/ – /kɔs.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable –

 

Costume
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the final “e” is silent

/KAHS-chyoom//ˈkɑs.tʃjum/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Costumes
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/KAHS-chyoom-z//ˈkɑs.tʃjum.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Cottage
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced like the single flap-t (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAH-dihdʒ//ˈkɑ.ɾə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable 

 

Cottages
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced like the single flap-t (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and since the word is plural – the “e” becomes part of the “-es” ending and turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/KAH-dih-dʒihz/ – /ˈkɑ.ɾə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Cotton
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “t” but is (usually) stopped, and the second “o” turns into an i-schwa

/KAH-[t]ihn//ˈkɑ.[t]ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Couch
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination

– /kow-ch//kau.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Couches
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /KOW-chihz//ˈkau.tʃə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Cougar
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, the “g” is hard, and the “a” disappears

/KOO-g’r//ˈku.gɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Cough
– For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “gh” combination is pronounce like the letter “f”

/kawf/ – /kɔf/ –

 

Coughing
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “gh” combination is pronounce like the letter “f”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kaw-fing//ˈkɔ.fɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Could
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “oul” combination is prounced as a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /kəɪh[d]//kəɪ[ɾ]/

 

Council
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the second “c” is soft, and the “i” turns into a true-schwa

/KOWN-səl//ˈkɑun.səl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Count
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kown-[t]//kɑun.[t]/ – Notice also that and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Counter
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and for the “-er” suffixthe “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KOWN-t’r//ˈkɑun.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Countries
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /KUHN-chreez//ˈkʌn.tʃɹiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Country
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /KUHN-chree//ˈkʌn.tʃɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Countryside
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/KUHN-chree-sai[d]//ˈkʌn.tʃɹiː.saiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

County
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/KOWN-tee//ˈkɑun.tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Couple
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the short letter “u”, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/KUH-pəl//ˈkʌ.pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Couples
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the short letter “u”, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/KUH-pəl-z//ˈkʌ.pəl.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Coupon
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “u”, and the “o” is short

/KOO-pahn/ – /ˈku.pɑn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Courage
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination disappears, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/K’R-ihdʒ//ˈkɚ.ə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable 

 

Courageous
 – For this word, the “C” is hard,the “ou” combination disappearsthe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kə-RAY-dʒihs//kə.ˈɹeiː.dʒə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Courier
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination disappears, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-er” suffixthe “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/K’R-ree-‘r//ˈkɚ.ɹiː.ɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Course
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, and the final “e” is silent

– /kohr-s//koɹ.s/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable 

 

Coursework
.– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, the “e” is silent, the second “o” disappears, and the final “k” is (often) stopped

– /KOHR-s-w’r-[k]//koɹ.s.wɚ.[k]/ – Notice also that the “s” and the “k” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllbles

 

Court
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kohr-[t]/ – /koɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Courteous
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “e” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/K’R-dee-yihs//ˈkɚ.ɾiː.jə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Courtesy
 – For this word, the “C” is hard,the “ou” combination disappears, the “t” is a flap-d, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/K’R-dih-see//ˈkɚ.ɾə(ɪ).siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Cousin
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “u”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the “i” turns into an i-schwa

– /KUH-zihn//ˈkʌ.zə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Cousins
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “u”, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /KUH-zihn-z//ˈkʌ.zə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable 

 

Cover
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and for the “-er” suffixthe “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KUH-v’r//ˈkʌ.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Covered
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and for the “-er” suffixthe “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/KUH-v’r-[d]/ – /ˈkʌ.vɚ.[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Covering
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and for the “-er” suffixthe “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KUH-v’r-ing//ˈkʌ.vɚ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

Cow
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “how” or “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/kow//kɑu/ – Notice also that –

 

Cows
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “how” or “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/kow-z//kɑu.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Co-Wrote
 – For this hyphenated compound word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “w” is silent, the second “o” is long, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /KOH-roh-[t]//ˈko.ɹo.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

 

Cozy
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/KOH-zee//ˈko.ziː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

 

( American English PronunciationLetter C ) –


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