– American English Pronunciation–

– ( Letter C ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.


Cc

 

Ca – Com . Conc . Cond . Conf . Cong . Conj . Conn . Cons . Cont . Conu . Conv . Coo . Cop . Cor . Cos . Cot . Cou . Cov . Cow . Coz . Cr . Cu . Cy

 

 

Conc

Conceive
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “c” is soft, the “ei” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “e” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/kən-SEEV//kən.ˈsiːv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Concentrate
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the second “c” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KAHN-sihn-chray[t]//ˈkɑn.sə(ɪ)n.tʃɹe[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Concentration
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, and the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahn-sihn-CHRAY-shihn//ˌkɑn.sə(ɪ)n.ˈtʃɹeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Concept
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the second “c” is soft, the “e” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped, and the “t” is (often) stopped

/KAHN-seh[p]-[t]//ˈkɑn.sɛ[p].[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Concern
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “c” is soft, and the “e” disappears

– /kuhn-S’RN//kə(ʌ)n.sɚn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Concerned
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “c” is soft, the first “e” disappears, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

– /kən-S’RN-[d]//kən.ˈsɚn.[d]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Concerning
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “c” is soft, the “e” disappears, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-S’RN-ing//kən.ˈsɚn.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Concerns
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “c” is soft, the “e” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /kən-S’RN-z//kən.ˈsɚn.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Concert
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the second “c” is soft, the “e” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/KAHN-s’r-[t]//ˈkɑn.sɚ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

Concerto
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “c” is pronounced like the “ch” combination, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “o” is long

– /kən-CHAYR-toh//kən.ˈtʃeɪɹ.to/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Concertos
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “c” is pronounced like the “ch” combination, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the final “o” is long, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/kən-CHAYR-tohz/ – /kən.tʃeɪɹ.toz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Concise
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/kən-SIGHS//kən.ˈsʌiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Conclude
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “c” is hard, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/kən-KOO[D]/ – /kən.ˈklu[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Concluded
 – For this word, The “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “c” is also hard, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /kuhn-KLOO-dih[d]//kʌn.ˈklu.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Conclusion
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “c” is hard, the “u” is long, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kuhn-KLOO-zhihn//kə(ʌ)n.ˈklu.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Concrete
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the second “c” is hard, the first “e” is long, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/KAHN-kree[t]//ˈkɑn.kriː.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Cond

Condemn
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, and the final “n” is silent

/kən-DEHM//kən.ˈdɛm/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Condemned
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “n” is silent, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “m”, the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/kən-DEHM-d//kən.ˈdɛm.d/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Condense
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “e” is short, and the second “e” is silent

/kən-DEHN-s/ – /kən.ˈdɛn.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable

Condensed
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “e” is short, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/kən-DEHN-s[t]/ – /kən.ˈdɛn.s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “st” ending (even when the “t” is stopped) acts as a third syllable

Condition
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kən-DIH-shihn//kən.ˈdɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable 

Conditional
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kən-DIH-shih-nəl//kən.ˈdɪ.ʃə(ɪ).nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable 

Conditions
 – For this word, The “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /kən-DIH-shin-z//kən.dɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Conducive
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, the second “c” is soft, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kən-DOO-sihv//kən.ˈdu.sɪv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable 

Conduct (noun)
 For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “u” is a u-schwa, the second “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped

/KAHN-duh[k]-t/ – /ˈkɑn.də(ʌ)[k].t/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable –

Conduct (verb)
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is short, the second “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped

/kən-DUH[K]-t//kənˈd / –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Conducted
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is short, the second “c” is hard, the “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t”, the “e” of the -ed ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /kən-DUHK-tih[d]//kən.ˈdʌk.tɪ[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Conf

Conference
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KAHN-frihn-s//ˈkɑn.fɹə(ʌ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable 

Conferences
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the first “e” disappears, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /KAHN-frihn-sih-z//ˈkɑn.fɹə(ɪ)n.sə(ɪ).z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable 

Confidence
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KAHN-fih-dihn-[t]//ˈkɑn.fə(ɪ).ɾə(ɪ)n.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Confident
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KAHN-fih-dihn-[t]//ˈkɑn.fə(ɪ).ɾə(ɪ)n.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Confidently
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KAHN-fih-dihn-[t]-lee//ˈkɑn.fə(ɪ).ɾə(ɪ)n.[t].liː/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Configure
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “g” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y”, and the final “e” is silent

/kən-FIHG-y’r/ – /kən.ˈfɪg.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable 

Configured
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “g” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

/kən-FIHG-y’r-[d]/ – /kən.ˈfɪg.jɚ.[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Confine
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/kən-FAIN//kən.ˈfaiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable 

Confined
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/kən-FAIN-d//kən.ˈfaiːn.d/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

Confirm
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the “i” disappears

– /kən-F’RM//kən.ˈfɚm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable 

Confirmation
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “i” disappears, the “a” is Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahn-f’r-MAY-shihn//kɑn.fɚ.ˈmeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Conflict
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/KAHN-flih-[k]t//ˈkɑn.flə(ɪ).[k]t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Conform
 
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the second “o” is long

/kən-FOHRM//kən.ˈfoɹm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Confront
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kən-FRUHN-[t]//kənˈfɹʌn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Confrontation
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahn-frihn-TAY-shihn//kɑn.fɹə(ɪ)n.ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Confucianism
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a i-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “You”, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kihn-FYOO-shihn-ih-zəm//kə(ɪ)n.ˈfju.ʃə(ɪ)n.ə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Confuse
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/kən-FYOOZ//kənˈfjuz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable 

Confused
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /kən-FYOUZ-[d]//kən.ˈfjuz.[d]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Confusing
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-FYOO-zing//kən.fju.ˈzɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable 

Confusion
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-FYOO-zhihn//kən.ˈfju.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable 

Cong

Congestion
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is soft, the “e” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “ch” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-dʒEHS-chihn//kən.dʒɛs.tʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable 

Conglomeration
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” disappears, the “a” is Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-glah-m’r-AY-shihn//kən.ˌglɑ.mɚ.eiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable 

Congratulate
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the first “a” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is an example of an adaptation of common usage rather than a “rule” of pronunciation), the “u” turns into a true-schwa, a, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-GRæ-dʒə-lay[t]//kən.ˈgɹæ.dʒə.le[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable 

Congratulations
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the first “a” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is an example of an adaptation of common usage rather than a “rule” of pronunciation), the “u” turns into a true-schwathe second “a” is Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/kən-græ-dʒu-LAY-shihn-z//kən.gɹæ.dʒuˈleiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable, the major stress is on the fourth syllable, and that the “s” ending acts as a fifth syllable

Congress
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short,  the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination, and for the “-gress” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix
in The Common Tongue)

/KAHNG-grihs//ˈkɑŋ.gɹə(ɪ)s / – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Conj

Conjugation
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g”, the “u” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahn-dʒih-GAY-shihn//kɑn.dʒə(ɪ).ˈgeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Conjunction
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “u” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the hard letter “c” directly after it), the second “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

–  /kən-dʒUHNG[k]-shihn/ –  /kən.ˈdʒʌŋ.[k].ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Conjunctivitis
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “u” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the hard letter “c” directly after it), the first “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-itis” suffix – the first “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and the second “i” is an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

–  /kən-dʒuhnk-tih-VIHG-dihs/ –  /kən.ˌdʒʌŋk.tə(ɪ).ˈvʌiː.ɾə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the major stress is on the fourth syllable, and that the minor stress is on the second syllable –

Conjugate
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAHN-dʒə-gay[t]//ˈkɑn.dʒə.ge[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Conn

Connect
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the second “c” is hard but is almost stopped

/kə-NEH[K]-t//kə.ˈnɛ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable –

Connected
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the second “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, and since the root-word ends in the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /kə-NEH[K]-dih-[d]//kə.ˈnɛ[k].də(ɪ).[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Connecticut
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the second “c” is silent, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa the third “c” is hard, the “u” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kə-NEH-dih-kih-[t]/ – /kə.ˈnɛ.ɾə(ɪ).kə(ɪ)[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

Connecting
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the second “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the
standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kə-NEH[K]-ting//kə.ˈnɛ[k].tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable –

Connection
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the second “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kə-NEHK-shihn//kə.ˈnɛk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Conniving
 – For this word, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kə-NAI-ving//kə.ˈnaiː.vɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Cons

Conscience
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “sc” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “ie” combination turns into an i-schwa, the second “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/KAHN-shihn-s//ˈkɑn.ʃə(ɪ)n.s/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

Conscientious
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “sc” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “e” is short, and for the “-tious” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahn-shee-EHN-shihs//kɑn.ʃiː.ˈɛn.ʃə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Conscious
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “sci” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KAHN-shihs//ˈkɑn.ʃə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Consensus
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, and the “u” turns into an i-schwa

– /kən-SEHN-sihs//kən.sɛn.sə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Consequence
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAHN-sih-kwehn-s//ˈkɑn.sə(ɪ).kwə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable 

Consequences
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/KAHN-sih-kwehn-sihz/ – /ˈkɑn.sə(ɪ).kwɛn.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Consequently
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the third “e” is short, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is
the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAHN-sih-kwehn-[t]-lee//ˈkɑn.sə(ɪ).kwə(ɪ)n.[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Conservative
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “e” disappears, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-S’R-vuh-dihv//kən.ˈsɚ.və(ʌ).ɾə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Conservation
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” disappears, the “a” is Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahn-s’r-VAY-shihn/ – /kɑn.sɚ.ˈveiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Conservationism
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” disappearsthe “a” is Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kahn-s’r-VAY-shihn-ih-zəm/ – /ˌkɑn.sɚ.ˈveiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.ə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress is on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

Conservationist
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” disappears, the “a” is Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kahn-s’r-VAY-shihn-ihs-[t]/ – /ˌkɑn.sɚ.ˈveiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.ə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a sixth syllable

Conserve
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwathe first “e” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/kən-S’RV/ – /kən.ˈsɚv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Conservatism
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwathe first “e” disappears, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kən-S’R-vuh-tih-zəm/ – /kən.ˈsɚ.və(ʌ).tə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Conservative
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwathe first “e” disappears, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kən-S’R-vuh-tihv/ – /kən.ˈsɚ.və(ʌ).ɾə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Conservatively
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwathe first “e” disappears, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /kən-S’R-vuh-tihv-lee/ – /kən.ˈsɚ.və(ʌ).ɾə(ɪ)v.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Consider
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-SIH-d’r//kən.ˈsɪ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Considerable (Consider-able)
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-SIH-d’r-uh-bəl//kən.ˈsɪ.ɾɚ.ə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Considerably
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ably” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-SIH-d’r-uh-blee//kən.ˈsɪ.ɾɚ.ə(ʌ).bliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Consideration
 –For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “a” is Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-sih-d’r-AY-shihn//kən.ˌsɪ.ɾɚ.ˈeiːʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Considerations
 –For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)the “a” is Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/kən-sih-d’r-AY-shihn-z//kən.ˌsɪ.ɾɚ.ˈeiːʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a sixth syllable

Considered
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (usually) a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/kən-SIH-d’r-d/ – /kən.ˈsɪ.ɾɚ.[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Consist
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-SIHS-[t]//kənˈsə(ɪ)s.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a third

Consolidate
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-SAH-lih-day[t]//kən.ˈsɑ.lə(ɪ).ɾe[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Constant
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAHN-stihn-[t]//ˈkɑn.stə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

Constantly
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KAHN-stihn-[t]-lee//ˈkɑn.stə(ɪ)n.[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Construct (noun)
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the first “t’ is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it)the “u” is a u-schwa, the second is (usually) stopped, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/KAHN-s-chruh[k]-[t]//ˈkɑn.s.tʃɹə(ʌ)[k].[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Construct (verb)
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “t’ is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it),the “u” is short, the second is (usually) stopped, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kən-s-CHRUH[K]-[t]//kən.s.ˈtʃɹ(ʌ)[k].[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Construction
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa,the first “t’ is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is short, the second “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kən-SCHRUHK-shuhn//kən.s.ˈtʃɹʌk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Constructively
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, the second “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kuhn-s-CHRUHK-tihv-lee//kə(ʌ)n.s.ˈtʃɹʌk.tɪv.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Consulate
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAHN-sə-lih[t]//ˈkɑn.sə.lə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first stress

Consult
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kən-SUHL-[t]//kənˈsʌl.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Consultancy
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “u” is short, and for the “-ancy” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahn-SUHL-tihn-see//kɑn.sʌl.ˈtə(ɪ)n.siː/ –Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Consultants
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is short, the first “t” is (sometimes) stopped, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kən-SUHL-[t]ihn-ts//kən.ˈsʌl.[t]ə(ɪ)n.ts/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Consultation
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “u” turns into a u-schwathe “a” is Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kahn-suhl-TAY-shuhn//kɑn.sə(ʌ)l.ˈteiː.ʃə(ʌ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Consultations
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “u” turns into a true-schwathe “a” is Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /kahn-s’l-TAY-shuhn-z/ – /kɑn.səl.ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable

Consulting
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kuhn-SUHL-ting//kə(ʌ)n.ˈsʌl.tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Consume
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, and the final “e” is silent

– /kən-SOOM/ – /kən.ˈsum/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Consumed
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, and because the root-word ends with the letter “m” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

– /kən-SOOM-d//kən.ˈsum.d/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Consumer
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-SOO-m’r//kən.ˈsu.mɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Consumerism
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-SOO-m’r-ih-zəm//kən.ˈsu.mɚ.ə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Consumers
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/kən-SOO-m’r-z/ – /kən.ˈsu.mɚ.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable 

Consuming
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kən-SOO-ming/ – /kən.ˈsu.mɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Consumption
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is short, the “p” is almost silent, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-SUHM[P]-shihn//kən.ˈsʌm[p].ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Cont

Contact
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “a” is short, the second “c” is (usually) stopped, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/KAHN-tæ[k]-[t]//ˈkɑn.tæ[k].[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable And that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable 

Contagious
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwathe “a” is Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and the “iou” combination turns into an i-schwa

– /kən-TAY-dʒihs//kən.ˈteiː.dʒə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Contain
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/kən-TAYN//kən.ˈteiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Contained
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

– /kən-TAYN-d/ – /kən.ˈeiːn.d/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Container
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-TAYN-‘r//kən.ˈeiːn.ɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Contemplating
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAHN-tihm-play-ding//ˈkɑn.tə(ɪ)m.ple.dɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Contemporary
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the second “o” disappears, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-TEHM-p’r-ayr-ee//kən.ˈtɛm.pɚ.ɹeɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Content (adjective)
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kən-TEHN-[t]//kən.ˈtɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

Content (noun)
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/KAHN-tehn-[t]//ˈkɑn.tɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

Contest (noun)
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/KAHN-tehs[t]/ – /ˈkɑn.tɛs[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Contest (verb)
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kən-TEHS-[t]/ – /kən.ˈtɛs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Contestable (Contest-able)
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “e” is short, the second “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kuhn-TEHS-dih-bəl//kʌn.ˈtɛs.də(ɪ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Context
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/KAHN-tek-s[t]//ˈkɑn.tɛk.s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Continent
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/KAHN-tih-nehn-[t]//ˈkɑn.tə(ɪ).nə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Continents
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/KAHN-tih-nehn-ts//ˈkɑn.tə(ɪ).nə(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a separate syllable 

Contingency
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is short, the “g” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/kuhn-TIHN-dʒihn-see//kə(ʌ).ˈtɪn.dʒə(ɪ)n.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Continually
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-TIHN-yoo-ə-lee//kən.ˈtɪn.ju.ə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Continue
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, and the “ue” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”

/kən-TIHN-yoo//kən.ˈtɪn.ju/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Continuous
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-TIHN-yoo-ihs//kən.ˈtɪn.ju.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Continuously
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the second “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/kən-TIHN-yoo-ihs-lee/ – /kən.ˈtɪn.ju.ə(ʌ)s.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Contraceptives
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “e” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped, for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/kahn-chruh-SEH[P]-tihv-z/ – /kɑn.tʃɹə(ʌ).ˈsɛ[p].tə(ɪ)v.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

Contract (noun)
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, the second “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

– /KAHN-chræ[k]-t//ˈkɑn.tʃɹæ[k].t/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Contract (verb)
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, and the second “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

– /kən-CHRæ[K]-t//kən.ˈtʃɹæ[k].t/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Contrarian
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ian” suffix – the “i” (converted from the letter “y” of the root-word) is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-CHRAYR-ee-ihn/ – /kən.tʃɹeɪɹ.iː.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Contrast (noun)
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/KAHN-chræs-[t]//ˈkɑntʃɹæs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

Contrast (verb)
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kən-CHRæS-[t]//kən.ˈtʃɹæs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

Contrasting
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-CHRæS-ting//kən.ˈtʃɹæs.tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Contribute
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /kən-CHRIH-byou-[t]//kən.ˈtʃɹɪ.bju.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Contributed
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” if the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/kən-CHRIH-byou-tih[d]/ – /kən.ˈtʃɹɪ.bju.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Contribution
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is an i-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahn-chrih-BYOO-shihn//kɑn.tʃɹə(ɪ).ˈbju.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Contributing
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kən-CHRIH-byou-ding//kən.ˈtʃɹɪ.bju.ɾɪŋ/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Contributor
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-CHRIH-byoo-d’r//kən.ˈtʃɹɪ.bju.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Control
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the second “o” is long

– /kən-CHROHL//kən.ˈtʃɹol/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Controlled
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “o” is long, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the “l” sound – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /kən-CHROHL-[d]//kən.ˈtʃɹol.[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Controls
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “o” is long, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/kən-CHOHL-z/ – /kən.ˈtʃɹol.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable 

Controversial
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” disappears, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahn-chrə-V’R-see-əl/ – /kɑn.tʃɹə.ˈvɚ.siː.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Controversy
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is short, the “t” is pronounced with the “ch” sound (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “o” turns into a u-schwathe “e” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/KAHN-chruh-v’r-see/ – /ˈkɑn.tʃɹə(ʌ).vɚ.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Conu

Conundrum
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the first “u” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the second “u” is a u-schwa

/kuh-NUHN-dʒruhm//kə(ʌ).ˈnʌn.dʒɹə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Conv

Convenient
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is long, the “i” is long, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-VEEN-yihn-[t]/ – /kən.ˈviːn.jə(ɪ)n.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth

Conveniently
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-VEEN-yihn[t]-lee//kən.ˈviːn.jə(ɪ)n[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Convention
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-VEHN-shihn//kən.ˈvɛn.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Conventions
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced amost like the letter “z”

/kən-VEHN-shihn//kən.ˈvɛn.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Conventional
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-VEHN-shihn-əl//kən.ˈˈvɛn.ʃə(ɪ)n.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Conversation
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” disappears, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahn-v’r-SAY-shihn/ – /kɑn.vɚ.ˈseiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Converse
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwathe first “e” disappears, and the second “e” is silent

/kən-V’RS//kən.ˈvɚs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Conversely
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwathe first “e” disappears, the second “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-V’RS-lee//kən.ˈvɚs.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Conversion
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwathe “e” disappears, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-V’R-[t]//kən.ˈvɚ.ʒə(ɪ)n/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

Convert (noun)
For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/KAHN-v’r-[t]//ˈkɑn.vɚ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

Convert (verb)
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwathe “e” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kən-V’R-[t]//kən.ˈvɚ.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

Convertible
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwathe “e” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ible” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kən-V’R-dih-bəl/ – /kən.ˈvɚ.ɾə(ɪ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Converting
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwathe “e” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kən-V’R-ding/ – /kən.ˈvɚ.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Convince
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the second “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /kən-VIHNS//kən.ˈvɪns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Convinced
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the second “c” is soft, and since the “root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/kən-VIHN-st//kən.ˈvɪn.st/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable ant that the “st” ending acts as a third syllable –

Convincing
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the second “c” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-VIHN-sing//kən.ˈvɪn.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Convincingly
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the second “c” is soft, the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kən-VIHN-sing-lee//kən.ˈvɪn.sɪŋ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Convoluted
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “u” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/kahn-vuh-LOO-dih[d]//kɑn.və(ʌ).ˈlu.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Coo

Cook
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “oo” combination tuns into a true-schwa (like in the word “foot” or “put”)

/kə-k//kə.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Cooks
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “oo” combination tuns into a true-schwa (like in the word “foot” or “put”)

/kə-ks//kə.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable

Cooked
 –For this word, the “C” is hard, the “oo” combination tuns into a true-schwa (like in the word “foot” or “put”), and since the word ends in the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

– /kə[k]-t//kə[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable –

Cooker
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “oo” combination tuns into a true-schwa (like in the word “foot” or “put”), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-kr//ˈkə.kɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable (also note that this is a European-English word and is almost never used in American-English or The Common Tongue.  It is always replaced by either the word “Cook” [for the person] or “Oven”/”Stove” [for the thing that one cooks with])

Cookie
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “oo” combination tuns into a true-schwa (like in the word “foot” or “put”), and the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/-kee//ˈkə.kiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Cooking
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “oo” combination tuns into a true-schwa (like in the word “foot” or “put”), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/Kə-king/ – /ˈkə.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Cool
– For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/kool//kul/

Cooperate (Co-operate)
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the two letters “o” (this is a product of the transition from one vowel sound to the next), the second “o” is short, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kə-WAH-p’r-ay[t]//kə.wɑ.pɚ.e[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third

Cooperation (Co-operation)
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the letters “o” (this is a product of the transition from one vowel sound to the next), the second letter “o” is short, the “e” disappearsthe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kə-wah-p’r-AY-shihn/ – /kə.ˌwɑ.pɚ.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

Cooperative
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is long, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the two letters “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the second “o” is short, the “e” disappears, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/koh-WAH-prə-tihv//ko.ˈwɑ.pɹə.tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Coordinate (Co-ordinate)
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the two letters “o” (this is a product of the transition from one vowel sound to the next), the second “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kə-WOHR-dih-nay[t]//kə.ˈwoɹ.ɾə(ɪ).ne[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fifth syllable

Coordinated (Co-ordinated)
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the two letters “o” (this is a product of the transition from one vowel sound to the next), the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” turns into an i-schwa,, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /kə-WOHR-dih-nay-dih-[d]//kə.ˈwoɹ.ɾə(ɪ).ne.ɾə(ɪ).[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that he “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable – 

Coordinator (Co-ordinator)
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the two letters “o” (this is a product of the transition from one vowel sound to the next), the second “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, the “i” is an i-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-or” suffix –the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kə-WOHR-[d]ih-nay-d’r//kə.ˈwoɹ.[ɾ]ə(ɪ).neiː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Cop

Cope
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “p” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/koh[p]//ko[p]/ –

Coping
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “p” is almost stopped, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KOH-ping//ˈko.pɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Copy
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “p” is almost stopped, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /KAH-pee//ˈkɑ.piː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Cor

Core
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/kohr/ – /koɹ/ –

Cordless (Cord-less)
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and for the “-less” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KOHR[D]-lihs//ˈkoɹ[d].lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Corner
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KOHR-n’r//koɹˈnɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Cornucopia
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “u” turns into an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard, the second “o” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/kohr-nih-KOH-pee-uh/ – /koɹ.nə(ɪ).ˈko.piː.ə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Corporate
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is long, the second “o” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KOHR-prih[t]/ – /ˈkoɹ.pɹə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable 

Corporation
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is long, the second “o” disappears, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kohr-p’r-AY-shihn/ – /koɹ.pɚ.ˈe.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable 

Corps
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “p” is silent, and the “s” is silent

/kohr/ – /koɹ/ –

Corpse
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/kohr-ps/ – /koɹ.ps/ – Notice also that the “ps” ending acts as a second syllable –

Correct
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and second next “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

– /kə-REH[K]-t//kə.ˈrɛ[k].t/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Correctly
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the second “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kə-REH[K]-[t]-lee//kə.ˈrɛ[k].[t].liː/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Correspondent
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is long, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r”, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the second “o” is short, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kor-ih-SPAHN-dihn-[t]//koɹ.ə(ɪ).ˈspɑn.də(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Corrupt
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is short, and the “p” is (often) stopped

– /kə-RUH[P]-t//kə.ˈɹʌ[p].t/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Corrupted
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is short, the “p” is almost stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /kə-RUH[P]-tih[d]//kə.ˈɹʌ[p].tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Corruption
 – For this word, The “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is short, the “p” is almost stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kə-RUHP-shuhn//kə.ˈɹʌp.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Cos

Cost
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like an “aw” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /kaws-[t]/ – /kɔs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Costs
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like an “aw” combination

– /kaws-ts/ – /kɔs.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable –

Costume
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the final “e” is silent

/KAHS-chyoom//ˈkɑs.tʃjum/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Costumes
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/KAHS-chyoom-z//ˈkɑs.tʃjum.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

Cot

Cottage
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced like the single flap-t (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAH-dihdʒ//ˈkɑ.ɾə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable 

Cottages
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced like the single flap-t (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and since the word is plural – the “e” becomes part of the “-es” ending and turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/KAH-dih-dʒihz/ – /ˈkɑ.ɾə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Cotton
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “t” but is (usually) stopped, and the second “o” turns into an i-schwa

/KAH-[t]ihn//ˈkɑ.[t]ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Cou

Couch
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination

– /kow-ch//kau.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

Couches
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /KOW-chihz//ˈkau.tʃə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Cougar
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, the “g” is hard, and the “a” disappears

/KOO-g’r//ˈku.gɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Cough
– For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “gh” combination is pronounce like the letter “f”

/kawf/ – /kɔf/ –

Coughing
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “gh” combination is pronounce like the letter “f”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kaw-fing//ˈkɔ.fɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Could
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “oul” combination is prounced as a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /kəɪh[d]//kəɪ[ɾ]/

Council
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the second “c” is soft, and the “i” turns into a true-schwa

/KOWN-səl//ˈkɑun.səl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Count
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kown-[t]//kɑun.[t]/ – Notice also that and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Counter
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KOWN-t’r//ˈkɑun.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Countries
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /KUHN-chreez//ˈkʌn.tʃɹiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Country
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /KUHN-chree//ˈkʌn.tʃɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Countryside
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/KUHN-chree-sai[d]//ˈkʌn.tʃɹiː.saiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

County
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/KOWN-tee//ˈkɑun.tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Couple
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the short letter “u”, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/KUH-pəl//ˈkʌ.pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Couples
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the short letter “u”, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/KUH-pəl-z//ˈkʌ.pəl.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

Coupon
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “u”, and the “o” is short

/KOO-pahn/ – /ˈku.pɑn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Courage
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination disappears, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/K’R-ihdʒ//ˈkɚ.ə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable 

Courageous
 – For this word, the “C” is hard,the “ou” combination disappearsthe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kə-RAY-dʒihs//kə.ˈɹeiː.dʒə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Courier
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination disappears, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/K’R-ree-‘r//ˈkɚ.ɹiː.ɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Course
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, and the final “e” is silent

– /kohr-s//koɹ.s/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable 

Coursework (Course-work)
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, the “e” is silent, the second “o” disappears, and the final “k” is (often) stopped

– /KOHR-s-w’r-[k]//koɹ.s.wɚ.[k]/ – Notice also that the “s” and the “k” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllbles

Court
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kohr-[t]/ – /koɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Courtesy
 – For this word, the “C” is hard,the “ou” combination disappears, the “t” is a flap-d, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/K’R-dih-see//ˈkɚ.ɾə(ɪ).siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Cousin
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “u”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the “i” turns into an i-schwa

– /KUH-zihn//ˈkʌ.zə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Cousins
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “u”, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /KUH-zihn-z//ˈkʌ.zə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable 

Cov

Cover
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KUH-v’r//ˈkʌ.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Covered
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/KUH-v’r-[d]/ – /ˈkʌ.vɚ.[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Covering
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KUH-v’r-ing//ˈkʌ.vɚ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Cow

Cow
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “how” or “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/kow//kɑu/ – Notice also that –

Cows
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “how” or “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/kow-z//kɑu.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

Co-Wrote
 – For this hyphenated compound word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “w” is silent, the second “o” is long, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /KOH-roh-[t]//ˈko.ɹo.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

Coz

Cozy
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/KOH-zee//ˈko.ziː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Cr

Crack
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /kræk/ – /kɹæk/ – Notice also that and that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Cracked
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “k”, the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/kæ[k]-t//kɹæ[k].t / – Notice also that and that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Craft
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kræf-[t]//kɹæf.[t]/ – Notice also that and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Crafts
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “a” is short

/kræf-ts//kɹæf.ts/ – Notice also that and that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

Cramming
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the
standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KRæ-ming//ˈkɹæ.mɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Cranky
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /KRæŋ-kee//ˈkɹæŋ.kiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Crash
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short,

/kæ-sh//kɹæ.ʃ/ – Notice also that and that the “sh” ending acts as a second syllable

Crazy
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /KRAY-zee//ˈkɹeiː.ziː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Cream
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/kreem//kɹiːm/

Create
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “e” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the “e” is silent

– /kree-AY-[t]//kɹiː.ˈeiː.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Created
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “e” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with sound of the letter “t”, the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /kree-AY-dih[d]//kɹiː.ˈeiː.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Creative
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “e” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kree-AY-dihv//kriː.ˈeiː.ɾə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Creativity
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “e” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kree-ay-TIH-vih-dee//kɹiː.eiː.ˈtɪ.və(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Creature
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KREE-ch’r//ˈkɹiː.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Credit
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “e” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /KREH-dih-[t]//ˈkɹɛ.ɾə(ɪ).[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Cretaceous
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “ce” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is
the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/krə-TAY-shihs//kɹə.ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Crew
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “ew” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”

– /kroo//kɹu/

Crib
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “i” is short, and the “b” is (often) stopped

/krih[b]/ – /kɹɪ[b]/

Cricket
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “i” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/KRIH-kih[t]//ˈkɹɪ.kə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Cricketer
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “i” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KRIH-kih-d’r//ˈkɹɪ.kə(ɪ).ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Crime
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/kraim//kɹaiːm/ – Notice also that –

Crimea
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “i” is long, the “e” is long, and the “a” turns into a u-schwa

/krai-MEE-uh//kɹaiː.ˈmiː.ə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Crimean
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “i” is long, the “e” is long, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/krai-MEE-ihn//kɹaiː.ˈmiː.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Criminal
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/krih-mih-nəl//ˈkɹɪ.mə(ɪ).nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Crises
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “e”is long, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/KRIGH-seez/ – /ˈkɹʌiː.siːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Crisis
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and for the “-sis” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KRIGH-sihs//ˈkɹʌiː.sə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Crisp
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “i” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/krihs-[p]//kɹɪs.[p]/ – Notice also that and that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Crispy
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “i” is short, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /KRIHS-pee//ˈkɹɪs.pɪ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Criteria
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “i” is long, the “e” is long, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into a u-schwa

– /krai-TEER-ee-uh//kɹaɪ.ˈtiːɹiː.ə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Criterion
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “i” is long, the “e” is long, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “o” turns into a true-schwa

/krai-TEER-ee-ən//kɹaiː.ˈtiːɹ.iː.ən/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Critical
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “i” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KRIH-dih-kəl/ – /ˈkɹɪ.ɾə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Criticism
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “i” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the second “c” is soft, and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KRIH-dih-sih-zəm//ˈkɹɪ.ɾə(ɪ).sə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Criticize
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “i” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KRIH-dih-saiz//ˈkɹɪ.ɾə(ɪ).saiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable – 

Criticizing
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “i” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “i” is short, the second “c” is soft, the third “i” long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KRIH-dih-sai-zing//ˈkɹɪ.ɾɪ.saɪ.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Croatia
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/kroh-AY-shuh/ – /kɹoh.eiː.ʃə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Croatian
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, and the final “a” turns into an i-schwa

/kroh-AY-shihn/ – /kɹoh.eiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Crop
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/krah[p]//kɹɑ[p]/ – Notice also that and that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Cross
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/kraws//kɹɔs/

Crowd
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “now” or “how” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (sometimes) stopped

/krow[d]//kɹɑu[ɾ]/ – Notice also that –

Crowded
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “now” or “how” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “d” is a flap-d, and since the roo-word ends with the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/KROW-dih[d]//kɹɑu.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Crown
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “now” or “how” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/krown//kɹɑun/ – Notice also that –

Crucial
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is long, and for the “-cial” suffix – the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KROO-shəl//ˈkɹu.ʃəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Crucified
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is long, the second “c” is soft, the first “i” turns into an i-schwa, the second “i” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the long letter “i” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

– /KROO-sih-fai[d]//ˈkɹu.sə(ɪ).faiː[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Cruel
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is long, and the “e” turns into a true-schwa

/KROO-əl//ˈkɹu.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Cruise
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ui” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/krooz/ – /kɹuz/ –

Cruises
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ui” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/KROOZ-ihz/ – /ˈkɹuz.ɪz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Crumble
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/KRUHM-bəl/ – /ˈkɹʌm.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Crumple
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/KRUHM-pəl/ – /ˈkɹʌm.pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Crush
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “u” is short

/kruh-sh//kɹʌ.ʃ/ – Notice also that the “sh” ending acts as a second syllable

Crust
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /kruhs-[t]//kɹʌs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable –

Crutch
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is short, the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/KRUH-ch//ˈkɹʌ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “tch” combination acts as a separate syllable –

Crutches
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is short, the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/KRUH-chihz//ˈkɹʌ.tʃə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Cry
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/krai//kɹaiː/ – Notice also that –

Cu

Cucumber
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “c” is hard, the second “u” is short, and the “e” disappears

– /KYOU-kuhm-b’r//ˈkju.kʌm.bɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Cuddle
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is short, the “dd” combination is pronounced simply as the single flap-d, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “d” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/KUH-dəl//ˈkʌ.ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Cuisine
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the letter “w”, the first “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “e” is silent

– /kwih-ZEEN//kwə(ɪ).ˈziːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Culprit
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/KUHL-prih[t]//ˈkʌl.pɹə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) as a third syllable 

Cultivate
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KUHL-tih-vay[t]//ˈkʌl.tə(ɪ).ve[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) as a fourth syllable 

Cultural
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “u” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “u” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KUHL-ch’r-əl//ˈkʌl.tʃəɹ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Culture
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “u” is short, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KUHL-ch’r//ˈkʌl.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Cultures
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is short, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /KUHL-ch’r-z//ˈkʌl.tʃɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending as a third syllable 

Cumin
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is long, and the “i” is an i-schwa

/KOO-mihn//ˈku.mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Cup
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/kuh[p]//kʌ[p]/

Cupboard
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is short, the “p” is stopped, the “oa” combination disappears, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/KUH-b’r[d]//ˈkʌ.bɚ[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Curate
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KYOUR-ay[t]/ – /ˈkjuɹ.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

Curb
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” disappears, and the final “b” is (often) stopped

/k’r-[b]//kɚ.[b]/ – Notice also that and that the “b” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Cure
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”

/kyoor//ˈkjuɹ/

Cured
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/kyoor.[d]//ˈkjuɹ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

Curiosity
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “o” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kyoo-ree-AH-sih-dee//kju.ɹiː.ɑ.sə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Curious
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KYOO-ree-uhs//ˈkju.ɹiː.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Curl
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” disappears, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “r” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/K’R-əl//ˈkɚ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Curly
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” disappears, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/K’R-lee//ˈkɚ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Currency
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the second “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/K’R-ihn-see//ˈkɚ.ə(ɪ)n.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Current
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r”(this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is often stopped

/K’R-ihn-[t]//ˈkɚ.ə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

Currently
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r”(this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /K’R-ihn[t]-lee//ˈkəɹ.ə(ɪ)n[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Cursor
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” disappears, and the “o” disappears

/K’R-s’r//ˈkɚ.sɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Curtail
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” disappears, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it)

/k’r-TAYL//kɚ.ˈteɪl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Curtain
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” disappears, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the “ai” combination disappears

/K’R-[t]’n//ˈkɚ.[t]ʔn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Curtains
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” disappears, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “ai” combination disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /K’R-[t]ihn-z//ˈkɚ.[t]ʔn.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Curve
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/k’r-v//kɚ.v/ – Notice also that –

Curved
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” disappears, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “v” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (sometimes) stopped

/k’r-v-[d]//kɚ.v.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that and that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

Custom
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is short, and the “o” turns into a true-schwa

/KUHS-təm//ˈkʌs.təm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Customer
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is short, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KUHS-tə-m’r//ˈkʌs.tə.mɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Customers
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is short, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/KUHS-tə-m’r-z//ˈkʌs.tə.mɚ.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Customs
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is short, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/KUHS-təmz//ˈkʌs.təmz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable 

Cut
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is short, and the “t” is (often) stopped

– /kuh[t]//kʌ[t]/

Cutting
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced like a single flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KUH-ding//ˈkʌ.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Cy

Cycle
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the second “c” is hard, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “c” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/SIGH-kə//ˈsʌiː.kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Cycling
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the second “c” is hard, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “c” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SIGH-kə-ling//ˈsʌiː.kə.lɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Cynical
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SIH-nih-kəl/ – /ˈsɪ.nə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

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( American English Pronunciation – Letter C ) –


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