– American English Pronunciation–

– ( Letter C ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.


Cc

 

Ce . Ch . Ci . Cl . Co . ComaComb . Come . Comf . Comi . Comm . Comp . Con – Cy

 

 

Cabinet
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “b” is (often) stopped, the “i” is almost silent, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/[B]-(i)-nih[t]/ – /ˈkæ[b].(i).nə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Cable
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/KAY-bəl/ – /ˈkeiː.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Cafeteria
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the first “e” turns into a true-schaw, the second “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/kæ-fuh-TEER-ee-yuh//kæ.fə(ʌ).ˈtiːɹ.iːjə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Cage
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is TRUE Long “A”, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/kay-dʒ//ke.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable

Cajun
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is TRUE Long “A”, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), and the “u” turns into an i-schwa

/KAY-dʒihn/ – /ke.dʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Cake
 – For this word, The “C” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “k” is (sometimes) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/kay-[k]/ – /keiː[k]/ –

Calamari
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the second “a” turns into a true-schwa, the third “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/kah-lə-MAH-ree/ – /kɑ.lə.ˈmɑ.ɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Calamity
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is short,, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kə--mih-dee//kə.ˈlæ.mə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Calculate
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the second “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KæL-kyou-lay[t]/ – /ˈkæl.kju.le[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Calculating
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the second “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” (usually) turns into a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KæL-kyou-lay-ding//ˈkæl.kju.leiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Calculation
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” is short, the second “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kæl-kyou-LAY-shihn/ – /kæl.ju.ˈleiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Calculator
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the second “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is  a flap-t, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KæL-kyou-lay-d’r/ – /ˈkæl.kju.le.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Calf
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the “l” is silent

/kæf//kæf/

California
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the first “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the “second “i” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/kæ-lih-FOHRN-yuh//kæ.lə(ɪ).ˈforn.jə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Call
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like an “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination sounds simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /kawl/ – /kɔl/ – 

Called
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “ll” combination is pronounced like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /kawl-[d]/ – /kɔl.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Calm
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination

/kahlm/ – /kɑlm/ –

Calmed
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and since the root-word ends with the letter “m” – the “e” of  the “-ed” ending is silent

– /kawlm-d/ – /kɔlm.d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Calming
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “l” is almost silent, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAWL-ming/ – /ˈkɔ[l]m.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Calmly
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAWL-m-lee//ˈkɔl.m.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Calmness
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KAW[L]M-nihss//ˈkɔ[l]m.nə(ɪ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Calories
 – for this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “o” disappears, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/-l’r-eez//ˈkæ.lɚ.iːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Camaraderie
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the fist “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second, the second “a” disappears, the third “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “d” is a flap-d, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /kəm-RAH-d’r-ee//kəm.ˈrɑ.ɾɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Came
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/kaym/ – /keiːm/ –

Camera
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “e” disappears, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/KæM-ruh//ˈkæm.ɹə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Cameras
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “e” disappears, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/KæM-ruhz//ˈkæm.ɹə(ʌ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Cameron
 – For this name, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “e” disappears, and the “o” turns into a true-schwa

– /KæM-rən//ˈkæm.rən/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Camp
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “p” if (often) stopped

/kæm[p]/ – /kæm[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Campaign
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “g” is silent

/kæm-PAYN/ – /kæm.ˈpeiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Campaigners
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “g” is silent, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/kæm-PAYN/ – /kæm.ˈpeiːnɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Camping
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KæM-ping/ – /kæm.pɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Campus
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the “u” turns into an i-schwa

/KæM-pihs/ – /ˈkæm.pə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Can
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “a” is short

– /kæn/ – /kæn/ –

Canada
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” is short, the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/-nih-duh//ˈkæ.nə(ɪ).də(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Canadian
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, and for the “-ian” suffix – the “i” (converted from the letter “y” of the root-word) is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kə-NAY-dee-ihn//ˈkə.ne.diː.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Canal
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the second “a” is short

– /kuh-NæL//kə(ʌ).ˈnæl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Canals
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is short, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /kuh-NæL-z//kə(ʌ).ˈnæl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Canal
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the second “a” is short

/kuh-NæL//kə(ʌ).ˈnæl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Canary
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /kuh-NAYR-ee//kə(ʌ).ˈneɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Cancel
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the second “c” is soft, and the “e” turns into a true-schwa

/KæN-səl//ˈkæn.səl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Cancelled
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the second “c” is soft, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /KæN-səl-[d]//ˈkæn.səl.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Cancer
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the second “c” is soft, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KæN-s’r/ – /ˈkæn.sɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Candidate
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KæN-dih-day[t]/ – /ˈkæn.də(ɪ).ɾe[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Candy
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/KæN-dee/ – /ˈkæn.diː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Cannot (Can not)
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” disappears, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is short, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/k’-NAH-[t]/ – /k’.nɑ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Can’t
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the “t” is (usually) stopped

– /kæn-[t]/ – /kæn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Cap
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/kæ[p]/ – /kæ[p]/ –

Capabilities
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” (usually) turns into a flap-d, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /kay-puh-BIHL-ih-deez//keiː.pə(ʌ).ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Capability
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-ability” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” (usually) turns into a flap-d, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /kay-puh-BIHL-ih-dee//keiː.pə(ʌ).ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Capable
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KAY-puh-bəl//ˈkeiː.pə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Capacity
 – For this word, the first “C” is hard, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is short, the second “c” is soft, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kuh--sih-dee//kə(ʌ).ˈpæ.sə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Capital
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-pih-dəl/ – /ˈkæ.pə(ɪ).ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Capitalize
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-pih-dəl-aiz/ – /ˈkæ.pə(ɪ).ɾəl.aiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Captain
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, and the “ai” combination turns into an i-schwa

– /[P]-tihn//ˈkæ[p].tə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Captivating
 – for this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, the first “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the second “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-dih-vay-ding/ – /ˈkæ[p].də(ɪ).veiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Captive
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /[P]-tihv//ˈkæ[p].də(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Capture
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/[P]-ch’r/ – /ˈkæ[p].tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Car
 – For this word, The “C” is hard, and the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

– /kahr//kɑɹ/

Carafe
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is short, and the final “e” is silent

/kuh-RæF//kə(ʌ)ˈræf / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Carbohydrates
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “o” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kahr-boh-HIGH-dʒray-ts//kɑɹ.bo.ˈhʌiː.dʒɹe.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a fifth syllable

Caramel
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the and the “e” is short

/KAYR-uh-mehl//ˈkeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).mɛl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Carbs
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “b” is (often) stopped, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /kahr[b]-z//kɑɹ[b].z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable –

Card
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/kahr[d]/ – /kɑɹ[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable –

Cards
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “d” is (often) stopped, and the final “s” is pronounced (almost) like the letter “z”

/kahr-dz/ – /kɑɹ.dz/ – Notice also that the “dz” ending acts as a separate syllable –

Cardboard
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “d” is (usually) stopped, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/KAHR[D]-bohr[d]/ – /ˈkɑɹ[d].boɹ[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Cardio
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e” and the final “o” is long

/KAHR-dee-oh//ˈkɑɹ.ɾiː.o/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Care
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/kayr/ – /keɪɹ/ –

Career
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/kuh-REE-r/ – /kə(ʌ).ˈɹiː-ɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable, that the “r” ending acts as a third syllable –

Careful (Care-full)
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” is silent, and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAYR-fəl/ – /ˈkeɪɹ.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Carefully (Care-full-ly)
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” is silent, and for the “-fully” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAYR-fə-lee//ˈkeɪɹ.fə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Careless (Care-less)
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “e” is silent, and for the “-less” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAYR-lihs/ – /ˈkeɪɹ.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Caribbean
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is an i-schwa, the “bb” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “b” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is long, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/kayr-ih-BEE-ihn/ – /keɪɹ.ə(ɪ).ˈbiː.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Carpet
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (almost always) stopped

/KAHR-pih[t]/ – /ˈkɑɹ.pə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Carpool
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/KAHR-pool//ˈkɑɹ.pul/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Carrot
 – for this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (almost always) stopped

– /KAYR-ih-[t]/ – /ˈkeɪɹ.ə(ɪ).[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Carrots
 – for this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

– /KAYR-ih-ts/ – /ˈkeɪɹ.ə(ɪ).ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable –

Carry
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/KAYR-ee/ – /ˈkeɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Cars
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” sounds like the short letter “o”, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /kahr-z/ – /kɑɹ.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable –

Cartoon
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /kahr-TOON//kɑɹ.ˈtun/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Cartridges
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is an i-schwa, the “dg” combination is pronounced simply like the single soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” of the “-es” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/KAHR-chrih-dʒihz//ˈkɑɹ.tʃɹə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Case
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/kays/ – /keiːs/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable –

Cash
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

/kæsh/ – /kæʃ/ – Notice also that the “sh” ending acts as a second syllable –

Cashew
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the “ew” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”

– /kæ-SHYOO//kæ.ˈʃju/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Casino
 – For this word, The “C” is hard, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “o” is long

– /kuh-SEE-noh//kə(ʌ).ˈsiː.no/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Cast
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) silent

/kæs[t]/ – /kæs[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Castle
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “t” is silent, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “t” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/-səl/ – /ˈkæ.səl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Casual
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “s” sounds like the voiced version of the “sh” combination, the “u” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /-zhoo-əl//ˈkæ.ʒu.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Cat
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kæ[t]/ – /kæ[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Catamaran
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “a” turns into a true-schwa, the third “a” disappears, and the last “a” is short

/-duh-m’r-æn//kæ.ɾə(ʌ).mɚ.æn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Catastrophe
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is short, the second “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is long

– /kuh-TæS-chruh-fee//kə(ʌ).ˈtæs.tʃɹə(ʌ).fiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Catastrophes
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is short, the second “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is long, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /kuh-TæS-chruh-feez//kə(ʌ).ˈtæs.tʃɹə(ʌ).fiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Catastrophic
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” is short, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is
(sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kæ-duhs-CHRAH-fihk//kæ.tə(ʌ)s.ˈtʃɹɑ.fə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Catch
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “e”, and the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/kə-ch/ – /kə.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable –

Catchy
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “e”, the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/KEH-chee//ˈkɛ.tʃiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Categorize
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “o” is long, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/Kæ-dih-gohr-aiz//ˈkæ.ɾih.goɹ.aiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Category
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, and for “-ory” suffix – the “o” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /-də-gohr-ee//ˈkæ.ɾə.goɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Cater
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAY-d’r/ – /ˈke.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Catering
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAY-d’r-ing/ – /ˈke.ɾɚ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Catholic
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “th” is un-voiced, the “o” disappears, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KæTH-lihk/ – /ˈkæθ.lə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Catholicism (Catholic-ism)
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “th” is un-voiced, the “o” is short, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “c” is soft (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kə-THAH-lih-sih-zəm/ – /kə.ˈθɑ.lə(ɪ).sə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Cats
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kæ-ts/ – /kæ.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a separate syllable –

Caucasian
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the second “c” is hard, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, and for the “-sian” suffix, the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/kaw-KAY-zhihn//kɑ.ˈke.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Caught
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “augh” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kaw[t]/ – /kɔ[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Cause
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

– /kawz//kɔz/

Caused
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /kawz-[d]//kɔz.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Causes
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “s” sounds like the letter “z”, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /KAW-zihz//ˈkɔ.zə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Cautious
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and for the “-tious” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAW-shihs//ˈkɔ.ʃə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Caveat
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” is short, the “e” is long, the second is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/-vee-ah[t]//ˈkæ.viː.ɑ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

CD
– For this acronym (and all acronyms which do not spell a word) we pronounce each letter as the name of that letter

/see-dee/ – /siː.diː/ – Notice also that there is no discernible word-stress –

Ce

Cease
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “e” is silent

/sees/ – /siːs/ –

Ceased
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and since the root word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/sees-t//siːs.t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Ceiling
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “ei” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEE-ling/ – /ˈsiː.lɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Celebrate
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEH-lə-bray-[t]/ – /ˈsɛ.lə.bɹe.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Celebrated
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/SEH-lə-bray-dih-[d]/ – /ˈsɛ.lə.bɹe.ɾə(ɪ).[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

Celebrating
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SEHL-ə-bray-ding/ – /ˈsɛl.ə.bɹeiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Celebration
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a u-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /sehl-uh-BRAY-shuhn//sɛl.ə(ʌ).bɹeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Celebs
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/sə-LEHB-z//sə.ˈlɛb.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Celiac
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” is short, and the final “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

– /SEE-lee-æ-[k]//siː.liː.æ.[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Cell
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “e” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/sehl/ – /sɛl/ –

Celsius
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “e” is short, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “u” turns into an i-schwa

/SEHL-see-ihs//ˈsɛl.siː.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Cement
– For this word, the “C” is soft, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/sə-MEHN-[t]//sə.ˈmɛn.t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable –

Cementing
– For this word, the “C” is soft, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sə-MEHN-ting//sə.ˈmɛn.tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Censorship
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “e” is short, the “o” disappears, and for the “-ship” suffix – the “sh” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEHN-s’r-shih[p]//ˈsɛn.sɚ.ʃə(ɪ)[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Cent
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, and the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/sehn-[t]/ – /sɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Center
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the first “e” is short, and the second “e” disappears

/SEHN-t’r//ˈsɛn.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Centigrade
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “e” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ade” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEHN-tih-gray[d]//ˈsɛn.tə(ɪ).gɹe[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Centimeter
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “e” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “e” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and the second “e” disappears

/SEHN-tih-mee-d’r/ – /ˈsɛn.tə(ɪ).miː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Central
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEHN-chrəl/ – /ˈsɛn.tʃɹəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Centralized
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/SEHN-chrəl-aiz-[d]/ – /ˈsɛn.tʃɹəl.aiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Century
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” placed directly after it), the “u” turns into a true-schwa but almost disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SEHN-ch[ə].ree/ – /ˈsɛn.tʃ[ə].ɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

CEO
 – For this acronym (as with all acronyms which do not spell a word), we simply pronounce each letter by the name of that letter

– /see-ee-oh/ – /siː.iː.o/ – Notice also that there is no discernible stress –

Ceramics
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “e” disappears, the “a” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s’r-æ-mih-ks//sɚ.ˈæ.mə(ɪ).ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a third syllable –

Cerebral
– For this word, the “C” is soft, the first “e” is a true-schwa, the second “e” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sə-REE-brəl//sə.ˈɹiː.bɹəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Ceremonious
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the first “e” is pronounced like The Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sayr-ə-MOH-nee-ihs//seɪɹ.ə.ˈmo.niː.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Ceremony
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the first “e” is pronounced like The Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SAYR-ə-moh-nee//ˈseɪɹ.ə.mo.niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Certain
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “e” disappears, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the “ai” combination turns into an i-schwa

– /S’R-[t]ihn//ˈsɚ.[t]ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Certainly
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “e” disappears, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “ai” combination turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/S’R-[t]ihn-lee/ – /ˈsɚ.[t]ə(ɪ)n.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Certificate
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the first “e” disappears, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s’r-TIH-fih-kih-[t]/ – /sɚ.ˈtɪ.fə(ɪ).kə(ɪ).[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

Certified
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “e” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “i” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/S’R-dih-fai-[d]/ – /ˈsɚ.ɾə(ɪ).faiː.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Cesarean
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “e” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the second “a” turns into an i-schwa

/sih-SAYR-ee-yihn//sə(ɪ).ˈSeɪɹ.iː.jə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Ch

Chain
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/chayn/ – /tʃeiːn/

Chained
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/chayn-[d]/ – /tʃeiːn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Chair
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it)

/chay-‘r/ – /tʃeɪ.ɚ/ – Notice also that the “r” acts as a second syllable –

Chairman
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-man” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/CHAY-r-mihn/ – /ˈtʃeɪ.ɚ.mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Chairwoman
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/CHAY-r-wə-mihn/ – /tʃeɪ.ɚ.wə.mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Challenge
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ll” is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /CHæ-lihn-dʒ/ – /ˈtʃæ.lə(ɪ)n.dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

Challenging
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ll” is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /CHæ-lihn-dʒing/ – /ˈtʃæ.lə(ɪ)n.dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Chamber
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHAYM-b’r/ – /tʃeiːm.bɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Champion
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/CHæM-pee-ihn/ – /ˈtʃæm.piː.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Chance
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /chæn-s//tʃæn.s/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable –

Change
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/chayn-dʒ/ – /cheiːn.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable

Changeable (Change-able)
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, the first “e” is silent, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/chayn-dʒuh-bəl/ – /cheiːn.dʒə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable

Changed
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and since the root word ends with the sound of the soft “g”, – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and even though, according to the rules for the “-ed” ending, the “d” should be pronounced like the letter “d”, in this word, (because of the “dʒ” sound) the “d” sounds like the letter “t” but is (sometimes) stopped

– /CHAYN-dʒ-[t]//tʃeiːndʒ.[t]/ – Notice that the the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as third syllable

Changes
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and for the “-es” ending – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/CHAYN-dʒihz/ – /cheiːn.dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable

Changing
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHAYN-dʒing/ – /tʃeiːn.dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Channel
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” turns into a true-schwa

/CHæ-nəl/ – /ˈtʃæ.nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Chaos
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “a” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “o” is short

– /KAY-yahs//ˈkeiː.jɑs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Chaotically
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “a” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “o” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kay-YAH-dihk-lee/ – /keiː.jɑ.ɾɪ(ə)k.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Chapter
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, and the “e” disappears

/CHæ[P]-t’r//ˈtʃæ[p].tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Character
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KAYR-ih[k]-t’r//ˈkeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)[k].tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Characterized
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final is (often) stopped

– /KAYR-ih[k]-t’r//ˈkeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)[k].tɚ.aiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Characters
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /KAYR-ih[k]-t’r-z//ˈkeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)[k].tɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Characteristic
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kayr-ih[k]-t’r-IHS-tih[k]//ˌkeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)[k].tɚ.ˈɪs.tɪ[k]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

Characteristics
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but  is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kayr-ih[k]-t’r-IHS-tih-ks//ˌkeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)[k].tɚ.ˈɪs.tə(ɪ).ks/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable, that the major stress is on the fourth syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a sixth syllable –

Charge
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is soft and the “e” is silent

– /chahr-dʒ//tʃɑɹ.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable –

Charges
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /CHAHR-dʒihz//ˈtʃɑɹ.dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Charismatic
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/chayr-iz--dih[k]//ˌkeɪɹ.ɪz.ˈmæ.ɾə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Charitable
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /CHAYR-ih-də-bəl/ – /ˈtʃeɪɹ.ɪ.ɾə.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Charity
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /CHAYR-ih-dee//tʃeɪɹ.ɪ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Chart
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/chahr-[t]//tʃɑɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Chartered
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the first “e” disappears, and since the root-word ends with the letter “r”– the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/CHAHR-t’r-[d]//ˈtʃɑɹ.tɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Chase
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/chays//tʃeiːs/

Chat
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/chæ-[t]//tʃæ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Cheap
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/chee[p]//tʃiː[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Cheaply
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHEEP-lee//ˈtʃiːp.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Cheat
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/chee-[t]//tʃiː.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Cheating
 – For this word the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /CHEE-ding/ – /tʃiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Check
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/cheh-k//tʃɛ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Checked
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tonguebut is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/cheh[k]-t//tʃɛ[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Cheek
– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/cheek//tʃiːk/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Cheerful (Cheer-full)
– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHEER-fəl//ˈtʃiːɹ.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Cheese
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/cheez//tʃiːz/

Chef
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, and the “e” is short

/shehf/ – /ʃɛf/ –

Chemical
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced simply like the hard letter “c”, the “e” is short, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KEH-mih-kəl//ˈkɛ.miː.kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Chemist
– For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “e” is short, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KEH-mihs-[t]/ – /ˈkɛ.mə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Chemistry
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “e” is short, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/KEH-mihs-chree//ˈkɛ.mə(ɪ)s.tʃɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Cherry
 – For this word, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/CHAYR-ee//ˈtʃeɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Cherokee
 – For this tribal name, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/CAYR-uh-kee//ˈtʃeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).kiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Chest
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/cheh-s[t]//tʃɛ.s[t]/ – Notice also that the “st” ending acts as a second syllable

Chew
 – For this word, the “ew” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/choo//tʃu/

Chicago
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounce like the “sh” combination, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is hard, and the final “o” is long

/shih-KAH-go/ – /ʃə(ɪ).ˈkɑ.go/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Chicken
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHIH-kihn//tʃɪ.kə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Chief
 – For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/cheef//tʃiːf/

Child
 – For this word, the “i” is long, there is a phatom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “l”, and there is a phantom-schwa between the phantom consonant “y” and the letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /CHAI-yəl-[d]//ˈtʃaiː.jəl.[d]/Notice that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Childhood
 – For this word, For this word, the “i” is long, there is a phatom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “l”, and there is a phantom-schwa between the phantom consonant “y” and the letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “d” is a flap-d but is almost stopped, the “h” is pronounced, the “oo” combination tuns into a true-schwa (like in the word “foot” or “put”), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/CHAI-yəl[d]-hə[d]//ˈtʃaiː.jəl.[ɾ].hə[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Children
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHIHL-dʒrihn//ˈtʃɪl.dʒɹə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Chile
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

– /CHEE-lay//ˈtʃiː.leiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Chilean
 – For this word, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/chih-LAY-ihn//tʃə(ɪ).ˈleiː.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Chin
 – For this word, the “i” is short

/chihn//tʃɪn/

China
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the “a” turns into a u-schwa

– /CHAI-nuh//ˈtʃaiː.nə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Chinese
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the first “e” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/chai-NEEZ/ – /tʃaiː.ˈniːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Chip
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/chih[p]//tʃɪ[p]/

Chirp
 – For this word, the “i” disappears, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/ch’r-[p]/ – /tʃɚ.[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Chivalrous
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “i” is short, for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SHIH-vəl-rəs//ˈʃɪ.vəl.ɹə(ʌ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Chivalry
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “i” is short, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” sounds like the long letter “e”

– /SHIH-vəl-ree//ˈʃɪ.vəl.ɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Chocked
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) but is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/CHAH[K]-t//ˈtʃɑ[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Chocolate
 – For this word, the first “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “c” is hard, the second “o” disappears, the “a” sounds like the short letter “i”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /CHAWK-lih[t]//ˈtʃɔk.lɪ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Chocolatier
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “c” is hard, the second “o” disappears, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, and the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /chawk-lih-TEER//tʃɔ.klɪ.ˈtiːɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Choice
 – For this word, the “oi” is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “c” is soft, and the “e” ending is silent

/choy-s//tʃoiː.s/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable

Choir
 – For this word, the “ch” combination is pronounced like the letter “k”, there is a phantom “w” in between the “h” and the “o”, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and there is a phantom consonant in-between the “oi” combination and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)

/KWIGH-yr/ – /ˈkwʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Choose
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/choo-z//tʃu.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

Chop
 – For this word, the “o” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/chah-[p]//tʃɑ.[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Chop Suey
 – For the name of this Pseudo-Chinese dish, the “o” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped, the “ue” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the “y” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /chah[p]-SOO-ee//tʃɑ[p].ˈsu.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Choral
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “o” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KOHR-əl//ˈkoɹ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Chord
 – For this word, the “ch” combination is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “o” is long, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /kohr[d]//koɹ[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Chose
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/chohz//tʃoz/

Chosen
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHOH-zihn//ˈtʃo.zə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Christmas
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “i” is short, the “t” is silent, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/KRIHS-mihs//ˈkɹɪs.m(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Chucking
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHUH-king//ˈtʃʌ.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Church
 – For this word, the “u” disappears

/ch’r-ch//tʃɚ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

Churches
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced (almost) like the letter “z”

/CH’R-chihz//ˈtʃɚ.tʃə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

Churn
 – For this word, the “u” disappears

– /ch’r-n//tʃɚ.n/ – Notice also that the “n” ending acts as a second syllable

Chute
 – For this word, the “Ch” combination is pronounced like the “Sh” combination, the “u” is long, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/shoo-[t]/ – /ʃu.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Ci

Cigar
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, and the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/sih-GAHR/ – /sə(ɪ).ˈgɑɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Cigarette
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “e” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “t” but is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/sih-guh-REH[T]/ – /sə(ɪ).gə(ʌ).ˈɹɛ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Cinema
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “i” is short, and the “e” turns into an true-schwa, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/SIH-nə-muh//ˈsɪ.nə.mə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Cinematographer
– For this word, the “C” is soft, the “i” is short, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is short, the “g” is hard, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sih-nə-muh-TAH-gruh-f’r//ˌsɪ.nə.mə(ʌ).ˈtɑ.gɹə(ʌ).fɚ/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Cinematography
– For this word, the “C” is soft, the “i” is short, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is short, the “g” is hard, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/sih-nə-muh-TAH-gruh-fee//ˌsɪ.nə.mə(ʌ).ˈtɑ.gɹə(ʌ).fiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Cinnamon
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “i” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

– /SIH-nə-mihn/ – /ˈsɪ.nə.mɪn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Circle
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “i” disappears, the second “c” is hard, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “c” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/S’R-kəl//ˈsɚ.kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Circuit
 – For this word, The first “C” is soft, the “i” disappears, the second “c” is hard, the “ui” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “i”, and the final is “t” (usually) stopped

– /S’R-kih[t]//ˈsəɹ.kɪ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Circuitry
 – For this word, The first “C” is soft, the “i” disappears, the second “c” is hard, the “ui” combination turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /S’R-kih-chree//ˈsəɹ.kə(ɪ).tʃɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Circulate
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “i” disappears, the second “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “You”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/S’R-kyoo-lay[t]//ˈsɚ.kju.le[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Circumstance
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “i” disappears, the second “c” is hard, the “u” is a u-schwa, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” is short, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/S’R-kuhm-stæns//ˈsɚ.kə(ʌ)m.stæns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Circumstances
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “i” disappears, the second “c” is hard, the “u” is a u-schwa, for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” is short, the “c” is soft, and since the word is plural – the “e” merges with the “-es” ending and turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/S’R-kuhm-stæn-sihz/ – /ˈsɚ.kʌm.stæn.sɪz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Cite
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/sigh[t]//sʌiː[t]/

Citing
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SIGH-ding//ˈsʌiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Citizen
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the first “i” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “z” is pronounced like the letter “s”, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SIH-dih-sihn//ˈsɪ.ɾə(ɪ).sə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Citizens
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the first “i” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “z” is pronounced almost like the letter “s”, for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/SIH-dih-zihn-z/ – /ˈsɪ.ɾə(ɪ).zə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Citizenship
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the first “i” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “z” is pronounced like the letter “s”, for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the  standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ship” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/SIH-dih-sihn-shih[p]//ˈsɪ.ɾə(ɪ).sə(ɪ)n.ʃə(ɪ)[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

City
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the “i” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /SIH-dee//ˈsɪ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Civil
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the first “i” is short, and the second “i” turns into a true-schwa

/SIH-vəl//ˈsɪ.vəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Civilization
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the first “i” is short, the second “i” disappears, the third “i” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sih-v’l-ai-ZAY-shihn-z//ˌsɪ.v’l.aiː.ˈzeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

Civilizations
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the first “i” is short, the second “i” disappears, the third “i” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/sih-v’l-ai-ZAY-shihn-z//ˌsɪ.v’l.aiː.ˈzeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable, that the major stress is on the fourth syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a sixth syllable

Civilized
 – For this word, the “C” is soft, the first “i” is short, the second “i” disappears,, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z”– the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/CIH-və-laiz-[d]//ˈsɪ.vəlaiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Cl

Claim
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/klaym//kleiːm/ – Notice also that –

Clap
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “p” is often stopped

/klæ-[p]//klæ.[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Clarification
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “i” turns into a true-schwa, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard, the second “a” is a Lyng “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/klayr-ə-fih-KAY-shihn/ – /ˌkleɪɹ.ə.fə(ɪ).ˈkeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

Clarified
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is long, the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the “d” of the -ed” ending is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/KAYR-ih-fai[d]/ – /ˈkleɪɹ.ə(ɪ).faiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Clarify
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/KAYR-ih-fai/ – /ˈkleɪɹ.ə(ɪ).faiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Class
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s”  (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/klæs//klæs/ –

Classes
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s”  (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/KLæ-sihz//klæ.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Classic
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KLæ-sihk//ˈklæ.sə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Classical
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but  is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KLæ-sih-kəl//ˈklæ.sə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Classics
 – For this word the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KLæ-sih-ks//ˈklæ.sə(ɪ).ks/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a third syllable

Classism (Class-ism)
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KLæ-sih-zəm//ˈklæ.sə(ɪ).zəm/– Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Classroom
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/KLæS-room//ˈklæs.rum / – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Clause
 – For this word, the “c” is hard, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/klawz//klɑz/

Clean
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/kleen//kliːn/ –

Cleanliness
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KEHN-lee-nihs//ˈklɛn.liː.nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Clear
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “e”

– /kleer//kliːɹ/

Clearly
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KLEER-lee//ˈkliːɹ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Cleveland
 – For this American city name, the “C” is hard, the first “e” is long, the second “e” disappears, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /KLEEV-lihn-[d]//ˈkliːv.lə(ɪ)n.[d]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Clever
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “e” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KLEH-v’r//ˈklɛ.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Click
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “i” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /klih-k//klɪ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Client
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “i” is long, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is often stopped

/KLAI-ihn-[t]//ˈklaiː.ə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Clients
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “i” is long, the “e” turns into and i-schwa

– /KLAI-ehn-ts//ˈklaiː.ə(ɪ)n.ts/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

Cliff
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “i” is short, and the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f”  (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/klihf//klɪf/

Climate
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “i” is long, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KLAI-mih-[t]//ˈklaiː.mə(ɪ).[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Climb
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “i” is long, and the final “b” is silent

/klaim//klaiːm/

Climbers
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “i” is long, the “b” is silent, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the single letter “z”

/KLAI-m’r-z//ˈklaiː.mɚ.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Climbing
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “i” is long, the “b” is silent, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KLAI-ming//ˈklaiː.mɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Clint
 – For this name (commonly), the “C” is hard, and the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /klihn[t]//ˈklɪn[t]/

Clinton
 – For this name (commonly), the “C” is hard, the “i” is short, the “t” is stopped, and the “o” disappears

– /KLIHN[T]-’n//ˈklɪn[t].ʔn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Clipped
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “i” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” but is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “p” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/klih[p]-t/ – /klɪ[p].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Clock
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/klah-k//klɑ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Clog
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the the “g” is hard

/klahg//klɑg/

Close
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/klohz//kloz/ –

Closed
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the “d” ending is (often) stopped

/clohz-[d]/ – /cloz.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Closes
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “e” of the “-es” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/KLOH-zihz//ˈklo.zə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Closet
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z” the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/KLAW-zih-[t]//ˈklɔ.zə(ɪ).[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

Cloth
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/klaw-th//klɔ.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable –  Click Here to Watch the Video

Clothes
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “th” is either voiced or completely silent, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /kloh-thz//klo.ðz/  –  OR  –  /klohz//kloz/ – Notice also that (when the “th” is voiced) the “thz” ending acts as a second syllable –  Click Here to Watch the Video

Clothing
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “th” combination is voiced, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KLOH-thing//ˈklo.ðɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Cloud
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/klow-[d]//ˈklau.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Clouds
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is almost stopped, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/klow-dz//ˈklau.dz/ – Notice also that the “dz” ending acts as a second syllable

Cloudy
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/KLOW-dee//ˈklau.diː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Clown
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “ow” is pronounced like in the word “now” or “how” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/klown/ – /klaun/ –

Club
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is short, and the final “b” is (often) stopped

/kluh-[b]//ˈklʌ.[b]/ – Notice also that the “b” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Clubbing
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is short, the “bb” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “b” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KLUH-bing//ˈklʌ.bɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Clubs
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is short, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/kluh-bz/ – /klʌ.bz/ – Notice also that the “bz” ending acts as a second syllable

Cluster
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KLUHS-t’r/ – /ˈklʌs.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Clutching
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is short, the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KLUH-ching//ˈklʌ.tʃɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Co

Coach
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /koh-ch/ – /ko.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

Coal
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /kohl//kol/

Coals
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /kohl-z//kol.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

Coarse
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/kohr-s/ – /koɹ.s/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable

Coast
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/kohs-[t]//kos.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Coasting
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KOHS-ding//ˈkos.dɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Coat
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/koh-[t]//ko.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Cockroach
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” but is almost stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/KAH-[k]-roh-ch//ˈkɑ.[k].ɹotʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ck” combination and the “ch” combination act as separate syllables –

Code
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/koh-[d]//ko.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that –

Coffee
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/KAW-fee//ˈkɔ.fiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Coffin
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f”, and the “i” is an i-schwa

/KAW-fihn//ˈkɔ.fə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Cognition
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the first “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kah[g]-NIH-shihn//ˈʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Cognitive
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the first “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAH[G]-nih-tihv//ˈkɑ[g].nə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Cohabitating
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the first “a” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/koh--bih-TAY-ding//ko.ˌhæ.bə(ɪ).ˈte.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Cohabitation
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the first “a” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/koh--bih-TAY-shihn//ko.ˌhæ.bə(ɪ).ˈte.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Coherence
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the first “e” is long, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/koh-HEER-ihn-s//ko.ˈhiːɹ.ə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable

Coherent
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the first “e” is long, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/koh-HEER-ihn-[t]//ko.ˈhiːɹ.ə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Cohesive
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the “e” is long, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/koh-HEE-sihv//ko.ˈhiː.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Coin
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, and the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination  (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/koyn//koiːn/

Coin-Purse
 – This compound word is pronounced is as two separate words – The “C” is hard, and the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination  (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/KOYN-p’rs//ˈkoiːn.pɚs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Coincidence (co-Incidence)
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, there is a phantom “w” in-between the “o” and the “I” (this is simply a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “I” is short, the second “c” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/koh-WIHN-sih-dihns//ko.ˈwɪn.sə(ɪ).də(ɪ)ns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Cold
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is long, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /kohl-[d]/ – /kol.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the flap-d ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Collaborate (verb)
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “a” is short, the second “o” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kə--b’r-ay[t]//kə.ˈlæ.bɚ.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Collaborative
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is short, the second “o” disappears, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kə--bruh-tihv//kə.ˈlæ.brə(ʌ).tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Collaborators
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is short, the second “o” disappears, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “o” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/kə--b’r-ay-d’r-z/ – /kə.ˈlæ.bɚ.eiː.ɾɚ.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a sixth syllable

Collapse
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is short, and the final “e” is silent

/k’--ps//k’.ˈlæ.ps/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ps” ending acts as a third syllable

Collateral
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-tthe “e” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kuh--d’r-əl//kə(ʌ).ˈlæ.ɾɚ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Colleague
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, and the “eu” is silent

– /KAH-lee[g]//ˈkɑ.liː[g]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “g” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Colleagues/’s
 – For this word (plural or possessive), the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “g” is hard, the “eu” combination disappears, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /KAH-lee-gz//ˈkɑ.liː.gz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “gz” ending acts as a third syllable

Collect
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the second “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped

/k’-LEH[K]-t//k’.ˈlɛ[k].t/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Collected
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the second “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/k’-LEH[K]-dih[d]//k’.ˈlɛ[k].də(ɪ)[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Collection
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the second “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/k’-LEH[K]-shihn//k’.ˈlɛ[k].ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

College
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /KAH-lih-dʒ//ˈkɑ.lə(ɪ).dʒ/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

Collided
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l”, the “i” is long, the first “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/kuh-LAI-dih[d]//kə(ʌ).ˈlaiː.ɾə(ɪ)ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Collocation
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” is long, the second “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kah-luh-KAY-shihn//ˌkɑ.lo.ˈkeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Cologne
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” disappears, the second “o” is long, the “g” is silent, and the final “e” is silent

/k’-LOHN//k.ˈlon/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Colon
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is long, and the second “o” turns into an i-schwa

– /KOH-lihn//ˈkol.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Color
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the second “o” disappears

/KUH-l’r//ˈkʌ.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Colored
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the second “o” disappears, and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/KUH-l’r-[d]//ˈkʌ.lɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the flap-d ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

Colorado
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “o” is long

– /kaw-lə-RAH-doh//kɔ.lə.ˈɹɑ.ɾo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable 

Column
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “n” is silent

/KAH-ləm//ˈkɑ.ləm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Columbine
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “u” is a u-schwa, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/KAH-luhm-bain//ˈkɑ.lə(ʌ)m.baiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Coma

 

Comb

Combination
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, , and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahm-bih-NAY-shihn//kɑm.bə(ɪ).ˈneiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Combine (noun)
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/KAHM-bain//ˈkɑm.baiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Combine (verb)
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/kuhm-BAIN//kə(ʌ)mˈbaiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Combined
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “n”– the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /kuhm-BAIN[D]//kə(ʌ)m.ˈbaiːn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Combining
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kuhm-BAI-ning//kə(ʌ)m.ˈbaɪn.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Come

Come
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the final “e” is silent

/kuhm//kʌm/ –

Comedian
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ian” suffix – the “i” (converted from the letter “y” of the root-word) is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kuh-MEE-dee-ihn//kə(ʌ).ˈmiː.ɾiː.ə(ɪ)n/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Comedians
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ian” suffix – the “i” (converted from the letter “y” of the root-word) is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /kuh-MEE-dee-ihn-z//kə(ʌ).ˈmiː.ɾiː.ə(ɪ)n.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable

Comedy
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, and the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “y”

/KAH-mih-dee//ˈkɑ.mə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Comf

Comfort
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the second “o” disappears, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/KUHM-f’r-[t]//ˈkʌm.fɚ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

Comfortable
 – This word is pronounced in many different ways by many different people but the most common way is as follows:  The “C” is hard, the “first “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the second “o” disappears, the the “t” and “r” trade places, the “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, the “a” disappears, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” is silent

– /KUHM-f-d’r-bəl//ˈkʌm.f.dɚ.bəl/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Comfortably
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the second “o” disappears, the the “t” and “r” trade places, the “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, the “a” disappears, and for the “-ably” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KUHM-f-d’r-blee//ˈkʌm.f.dɚ.bliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Comforter
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the second “o” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KUHM-f’r-d’r//ˈkʌm.fɚ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Comi

Coming
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KUH-ming//ˈkʌ.mɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Comm

Command
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is short, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/kuh-MæN-[d]//kə(ʌ).ˈmæn.[d] / –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Commend
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

– /kuh-MEHN-[d]//kə(ʌ).ˈmɛn.[d]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Comment
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /KAH-mehn-[t]//ˈkɑ.mɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable 

Comments
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” is short

– /KAH-mehn-ts//ˈkɑ.mɛn.ts/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

Commercial
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” disappears, and for the “-cial” suffix – the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kuh-M’R-shəl//kə(ʌ).ˈmɚ.ʃəl/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Commission
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is short, the “ssi” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/kuh-MIH-shihn//kʌ.ˈmɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Commissioned
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is short, the “ssi” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/kuh-MIH-shihn-[d]//kʌ.ˈmɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Commit
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/kuh-MIH[T]//kə(ʌ).ˈmɪ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Commitment
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kuh-MIH[T]-mihn-[t]//kə(ʌ).ˈmɪ[t].mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Committed
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/kuh-MIH-dih[d]//kə(ʌ).ˈmɪ.ɾə(ɪ)ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Committee
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like a single “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, the “tt” is pronounced simply like the single flap-t  (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /kuh-MIH-dee//kə(ʌ).ˈmɪ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Commodities
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/kuh-MAH-dih-teez//kə(ʌ)ˈmɑ.ɾə(ɪ).tiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Common
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the second “o” turns into an i-schwa

– /KAH-mihn//ˈkɑ.mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Commonly
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KAH-mihn-lee//ˈkɑ.mə(ɪ)n.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Communicate
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kə-MYOO-nih-kay-[t]//kə.ˈmju.nə(ɪ).ke.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable –

Communication
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kuh-myou-nih-KAY-shuhn//kʌ.ˌmju.nɪ.ˈkeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Communion
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is pronounced like the consonant form of the letter “y”, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

– /kuh-MYOON-yihn/ – /kə(ʌ).ˈmjun.jə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Community
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kuh-MYOO-nih-dee/ – /kə(ʌ).ˈmju.nə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Commute
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/kuh-MYOO-[t]/ – /kə(ʌ).mju.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Commuter
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kuh-MYOO-d’r/ – /kə(ʌ).mju.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Comp

Companies
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /KUHM-pə-neez/ – /ˈkʌm.pə.niːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Companion
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “a” is short, the “i” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y”, and the second “o” turns into an i-schwa

/kuhm-PæN-yihn//kə(ʌ)mˈpæn.jə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Company
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /KUHM-pə-nee//ˈkʌm.pə.niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Compare
 – For this word, the “C” is hard,the “o” turns into a u-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

– /kuhm-PAYR//kʌm.ˈpeɪɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Compared
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending, is silent and the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/kuhm-PAYR-[d]/ – /kə(ʌ)m.ˈpeɪɹ.[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Comparison
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” turns into a true-schwa, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/kuhm-PAYR-ə-sihn//kə(ʌ)m.ˈpeɪɹ.ə.sə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Compass
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/KUHM-pihs//ˈkʌm.pə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Compatible
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ible” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kəm--dih-bəl/ – /kəm.ˈpæ.ɾə(ɪ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Compatibility
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the first “i” turns into a true-schwa, the second letter “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kəm--də-BIH-lih-dee//kəm.ˌpæ.ɾə.bɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable 

Compel
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the “e” is short

/kəm-PEHL//kəm.ˈpɛl/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Compelled
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “e” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

/kəm-PEHL-[d]//kəm.ˈpɛl.[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Compensate
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAHM-pihn-say-[t]/ – /ˈkɑm.pə(ɪ)n.se.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable 

Compensation
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahm-pihn-SAY-shihn/ – /ˌkɑm.pə(ɪ)n.ˈseiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Compete
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “e” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/kəm-PEE[T]//kəm.ˈpiː.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Competence
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAHM-pə-tihn-s//kəm.ˈpiː.tə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Competing
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kəm-PEE-ding/ – /kəm.ˈpiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Competition
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kahm-pə-TIH-shən//kɑm.pə.tɪ.ʃən/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Competitive
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the first “t” is a flap-t, the “i” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kəm-PEH-də-tihv/ – /kəm.ˈpɛ.ɾə.ɾə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Competitors
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /kəm-PEH-də-t’r-z//kəm.ˈpɛ.ɾə.tɚ.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable

Competitor
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kəm-PEH-də-t’r-z//kəm.ˈpɛ.ɾə.tɚ.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Compile
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant “y” & phantom-schwa combination in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)

/kəm-PAI-yəl/ – /kəm.paiː.jəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Compiling
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant “y” & phantom-schwa combination in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kəm-PAI-yəl-ing/ – /kəm.paiː.jəl.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Complacent
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is
(often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kəm-PLAY-sihn-[t]//kəm.ˈpleiː.sə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Complain
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

/kəm-PLAYN//kəm.ˈpleiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Complaint
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwathe “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /kəm-PLAYN-[t]//kəm.pleiːn.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Complaints
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwathe “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

– /kəm-PLAYN-ts/ – /kəm.pleiːn.ts/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

Complementary
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahm-plə-MEHN-tə-ree//ˌkɑm.plə.ˈmɛn.tə.ɹiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable  –

Complete
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “e” is long, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/kəm-PLEE[T]//kəm.ˈpliː[t] / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Completed
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “e” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /kəm-PLEE-dih[d]//kəm.pliː.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Completely
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “e” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the second “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kəm-PLEE[T]-lee//kəm.pliː[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Completing
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kəm-PLEE-ding//kəm.ˈpliː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Completion
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kəm-PLEE-shihn//kəm.ˈpliː.ʃə(ɪ)n / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Complex (adjective)
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, and the final “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/kəm-PLEH-ks//kəm.ˈplɛ.ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a third syllable –

Complex (noun)
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” is short, and the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

– /KAHM-plehks//ˈkɑm.plɛks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Complexion
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “xi” combination is pronounced like a “ksh” combination, and the second “o” turns into an i-schwa

/kəm-PLEHK-shihn//kəm.ˈplɛk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Compliance
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kəm-PLAI-ihn-s//kəm.ˈplaiː.ə(ɪ)n.s/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Complicate
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAHM-plih-kay-[t]//ˈkɑ.ke[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable 

Complicated
– For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” (pronounced as a flap-t) – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /KAHM-plih-kay-dih[d]/ – /ˈkɑm.plə(ɪ).ke.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Complicity
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the second “c” is soft, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kəm-PLIH-sih-dee/ – /kəm.ˈplə(ɪ).sə(ɪ).ɾiː/– Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Compliment
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa,, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the
final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAHM-plih-mihn-[t]/ – /ˈkɑm.plə(ɪ).mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable 

Complimentary
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kom-plih-MEHN-tə-ree//kɑm.plə(ɪ).ˈmɛn.tə.ɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Component
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is long, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kəm-POH-nihn-[t]//kəm.ˈpo.nə(ɪ)n.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Composed
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” is silent and the “d” is (often) stopped

– /kəm-POHZ-[d]/ – /kəm.ˈpoz.[d]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Composers
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is long, the fist “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” also is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /kəm-POH-z’r-z//kəm.ˈpo.zɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Comprehend
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, the second “e” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/kahm-prih-HEHN-[d]//kɑm.pɹə(ɪ).ˈhɛn.[d]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Comprehension
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, the second “e” is short, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kahm-prih-HEHN-shuhn//kɑm.pɹə(ɪ).ˈhɛn.ʃə(ʌ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Comprehensive
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, the second “e” is short, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kahm-prih-HEHN-sihv//kɑm.pɹə(ɪ).ˈhɛn.sɪv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Compromise
 – For this word, the “C” is hard,  the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

– /KAHM-prih-maiz//ˈkɑm.pɹə(ɪ).maiːz/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Compromised
 – For this word, the “C” is hard,  the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” is silent

– /KAHM-prih-maiz-d//ˈkɑm.pɹə(ɪ).maiːz.d/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Compromising
 – For this word, the “C” is hard,  the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KAHM-prih-mai-zing//ˈkɑm.pɹə(ɪ).maiː.zɪŋ/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Compulsory
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is short, and for “-ory” suffix – the “o” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the common pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/kəm-PUHL-s’r-ee//kəm.ˈpʌl.sɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Computer
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /kəm-PYOO-d’r//kəm.pju.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Computerized
 – For this word, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – and the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

– /kəm-PYOO-d’r-aiz[d]/ – /kəm.ˈpju.ɾɚ.aiːz[d]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

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( American English Pronunciation – Letter C ) –


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