– American English Pronunciation–

– ( Letter D:  Dd, De, Df ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily. The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Dd

 

Da – Dc . De . Df . Dg – Di . Dj – Dl . Dm – Do . Dp – Dr . Ds – Du . Dv – Dz

 

De

De Facto
 – This term is pronounced like a single word:  The “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, and the “o” is long

/də-FæK-doh/ – /də.ˈfæk.do/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Dead
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/deh[d]/ – /dɛ[ɾ]/ –

 

Deadline
.– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the second “d” is (usually) stopped, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

– /DEH[D]-lain//ˈdɛ[d].laiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Deadlines
.– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the second “d” is (usually) stopped, the “i” is long, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /DEH[D]-lain-z//ˈdɛ[d].laiːn.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Deadly
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the second “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DEH[D]-lee/ – /ˈdɛ[ɾ].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Deaf
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”

/dehf/ – /dɛf/ –

 

Deal
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/deel/ – /diːl/ –

 

Dealer
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dee-l’r/ – /diː.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Dealing
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dee-ling/ – /diː.lɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Dealt
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /dehl-[t]//dɛl.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Dear
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

– /deer//diːɹ/

 

Death
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the single short letter “e”, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/dehth//dɛθ/

 

Debate
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dee-BAY-[t]//diː.ˈbe.t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

 

Debating
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /də-BAY-ding//də.ˈbeiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Debilitating
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-BIH-lih-tay-ding//də.ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ).te.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Debris
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e” and the final “s” is silent

– /də-BREE//də.ˈbɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Debt
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “b” is silent, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /deh-[t]/ – /dɛ-[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Debts
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “b” is silent,

– /deh-ts/ – /dɛ.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable –

 

Debunk
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “u” is short, and the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it)

/dee-BUHNG-k//diː.ˈbʌŋ.k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “k” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Debut
 – For this word, the “e” is pronounced like the True Long “A”, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the final “t” is silent

– /day-BYOO//de.ˈbju/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Decade
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /DEH-kay[d]//ˈdɛ.ke[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Decadent
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DEH-kə-dihn-[t]/ – /ˈdɛ.kə.ɾə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Decades
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “d” is (often) stopped, the second “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /DEH-kay-[d]z//ˈdɛ.ke.[d]z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable  and that the “dz” ending (even when the “d” is stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Decaffeinated
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the first “a” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ei” combination is pronounced like the single i-schwa, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/dih--fih-nay-dihd//də(ɪ).ˈkæ.fə(ɪ).ne.ɾə(ɪ)ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Decay
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/dee-KAY/ – /diː.ˈkeiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

December
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, and the third “e” disappears

/dee-SEHM-b’r/ – /diː.ˈsɛm.bɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Decentralized
.– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “C” is soft, the second “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/dee-SEHN-chrəl-aiz-[d]//diː.ˈsɛn.tʃɹəl.aiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

 

Decide
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “c” is soft, the “i” is long, the “d” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /dee-SAI-[d]/ – /diː.ˈsaiː.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Decided
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “c” is soft, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

– /dee-SAI-dih[d]/ – /diː.ˈsaiː.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Decile
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is soft, and for the “-ile” suffix – the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is the product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DEH-sai-yl//ˈdɛ.saiː.jl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Decision
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the first “i” is short, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dee-SIH-zhuhn//diː.ˈsɪ.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Decisions
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the first “i” is short, for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /dee-SIH-zhuhn-z/ – /diː.ˈsɪ.ʒə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Deck
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/deh-k//dɛ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Declare
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

– /dee-KLAYR//diː.ˈkleɪɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Declared
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “a” is aLong “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /dee-KLAYR-[d]//diː.kleɪɹ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Decline
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/dee-KLAIN/ – /diː.ˈklaiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Decommissioned
.– For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is short, the “ssi” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the second “o” also turns into an i-schwa, and since the root-word ends in the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /dee-kuh-MIH-shihn-[d]//diː.kə(ʌ).mɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

 

Decorate
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DEH-kuh-ray[t]/ – /ˈdɛ.kə(ʌ).ɹe[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Decorated
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is is a flap-t,  and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/DEH-kuh-ray-dih[d]/ – /ˈdɛ.kə(ʌ).ɹe.də(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Decoration
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” disappearsthe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/deh-kuhr-AY-shihn/ – /dɛ.kə(ʌ).ɹˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

 

Decorative
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” disappears, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DEH-kruh-tihv/ – /ˈdɛ.kɹə(ʌ).tɪv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Decrease
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “e” is silent

/dee-KREES/ – /diː.ˈkɹiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Decreasing
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dee-KREE-sing/ – /diː.ˈkɹiːsɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Deductive
 – For this word, the first “e” is turns into an i-schwa, the “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dih-DUH[K]-tihv//də(ɪ).ˈdʌ[k].tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Deed
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /dee[d]//diː[d]/

 

Deeds
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “d” is (often) stopped, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /dee[d]-z//diː[d].z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable –

 

Deem
.– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/deem//diːm/

 

Deemed
.– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/deem-[d]//diːm.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

 

Deep
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/dee[p]//diː[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” ending acts as a second syllable –

 

Deepening
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DEE-pih-ning//ˈdiː.pə(ɪ).nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Deeply
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DEEP-lee/ – /ˈdiːp.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Deer
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/deer//diːɹ/

 

Deface
.– For this word, the “e” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/dee-FAYS//diː.ˈfeiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Defaced
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/dee-FAYS-[t]//diː.ˈfeiːs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

 

Defeat
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/də-FEE-[t]/ – /də.ˈfiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

 

Defective
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dih-FEH[K]-tihv//də(ɪ).ˈfɛ[k].tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Defend
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, and the second “e” is short

/dee-FEHN-d/ –/diː.ˈfɛn.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Defender
.– For this word, the first “e” is long, the second “e” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dee-FEHN-d’r//diː.ˈfɛn.dɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Defense – [to an attack]
 – For this word, the first “e” turns intoa true-schwa, the second “e” is short, and the final “e” is silent

– /də-FEHN-s/ – /də.ˈfɛn.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Defense – [in sports]
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the second “e” is short, and the final “e” is silent

– /DEE-fehn-s/ – /ˈdiː.fɛn.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Defenseless
.– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the third “e” disappears, and for the “-less” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dee-FEHNS-lihs/ – /ˈdiː.fɛns.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Defiant
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “i” is long, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dee-FAI-ihn-[t]/ – /diː.ˈfaiː.ə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Deficit
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/DEH-fih-sih[t]//ˈdɛ.fə(ɪ).sə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Define
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

– /dee-FAIN//diː.ˈfaiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Defined
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “i” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

– /də-FAIN-d//də.ˈfaiːn.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Definite
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/DEH-fih-nih[t]/ – /ˈdɛ.fə(ɪ).nɪ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Definitely
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, the second “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DEH-fih-nih[t]-lee/ – /ˈdɛ.fə(ɪ).nɪ[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Definition
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/deh-fih-NIH-shihn/ – /ˌdɛ.fə(ɪ).ˈnɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

 

Deform
.– For this word, the “e” is long, and the “o” is long

/dee-FOHR-m/ – /diː.ˈfoɹ.m/ – Notice also that the “m” acts as a third syllable –

 

Deformities
.– For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “o” is long, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/də-FOHR-mih-deez/ – /də.ˈfoɹ.mə(ɪ).ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Deformity
.– For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “o” is long, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/də-FOHR-mih-dee/ – /də.ˈfoɹ.mə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Degree
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “g” is hard, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/də-GREE/ – /də.ˈgɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Degrees
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced (almost) like the letter “z”

/də-GREEZ/ – /də.ˈgɹiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Deities
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “s” is pronounced (almost) like the letter “z”

/DEE-ih-deez//ˈdiː.ə(ɪ).ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Delay
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /dee-LAY/ – /diː.ˈleiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Delayed
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “a” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/də-LAY[D]//də.ˈleiː[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Delegate
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is stopped, and the “e” is silent

/DEH-lih-gay[t]//ˈdɛ.lə(ɪ).ge[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Delete
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the second “e” is long, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/dee-LEE[T]//diː.ˈliː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Deliberate
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “i” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-LIH-b’rih[t]//də.lɪ.bɹə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Deliberately
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-LIH-b’rih[t]-lee//də.ˈlə(ɪ).bɹə(ɪ)[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Delicate
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /DEHL-ih-kih[t]//ˈdɛ.lə(ʌ).kɪ(ə)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Delicious
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the first “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-LIH-shihs//dəˈlɪ.ʃə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Delight
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “right” or “fight” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/dee-LIGH[T]//diː.ˈlʌiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Delighted
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “right” or “fight” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/dee-LIGH-tih[d]//diː.ˈlʌiː.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Deliver
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, and the second “e” disappears

/də-LIH-v’r/ – /də.ˈlɪ.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Delivered
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the second “e” disappears, and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /də-LIH-v’r[d]//də.ˈlɪ.vɚ[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Delivering
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue),  and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring”(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-LIH-v’r-ing//də.ˈlɪ.vɚ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Delivery
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, and for the “-ery” suffix – the “e” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-LIH-v’r-ee/ – /də.ˈlɪ.vɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Delusion
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-LOO-zhihn//də.ˈlu.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Demand
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the “a” is short

/də-MæN-d/ – /də.ˈmæn.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Demands
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is short, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/də-MæN-dz/ – /də.ˈmæn.dz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “dz” ending acts as a third syllable –

Demise
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

– /də-MAIZ//də.ˈmaiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Democratic
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /deh-muh-KRæ-dih[k]/ – /dɛ.mə(ʌ).ˈkɹæ.ɾə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

 

Democracy
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “o” is short, the first “c” is hard, and for the “-acy” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /də-MAH-krə-see//də.ˈmɑ.kə.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Demographic
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “a” is short, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/deh-mə-GRæ-fih[k]//dɛ.mə.ˈgɹæ.fə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the main stress is on the third syllable

 

Demonstrate
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DEH-mihn-s-chray[t]/ – /ˈdɛ.mə(ɪ)n.s.tʃɹe[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Demoted
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/dee-MOH-dih[d]//diː.ˈmo.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Demutualizations
.– For this word, the “e” is long, the first “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the second “u” is long, for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /dee-myoo-choo-uh-lai-ZAY-shuhn-z//diː.ˌmju.ə(ʌ).laiː.ˈzeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllablethe major stress is on the sixth syllable and that the “z” ending acts a an eight syllable –

 

Denied
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “i” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the long letter “i” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/dee-NAI[D]/ – /diː.ˈnaiː[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Dent
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /DEHN-[t]//ˈdɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

 

Dented
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

– /DEHN-tih[d]//ˈdɛn.tə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Dentist
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DEHN-tihs-[t]//ˈdɛn.tə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Denver
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, and the second “e” disappears

– /DEHN-v’r//ˈdɛn.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Deny
 – For this word, the “e” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/dee-NAI//diːˈnaiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Department
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dee-PAHR[T]-mihn-[t]//diːˈpɑɹ[t].mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

 

Departure
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dee-PAHR-ch’r//diː.ˈpɑɹ.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Depend
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, and the second “e” is short

/də-PEHN-d//də.ˈpɛn.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Dependent
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the second “e” is short, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dee-PEHN-dihn-[t]//diː.ˈpɛn.də(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Deposit
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “o” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/də-PAH-sih[t]//də.ˈpɑ.zə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Depot
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “o” is long, and the “t” is silent

– /DEE-poh//ˈdiː.po/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Depreciating
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is long, the “c” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-PREE-shee-ay-ding]//də.ˈpɹiː.ʃiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Depreciate
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is long, the “c” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-PREE-shee-ay[t]//də.ˈpɹiː.ʃiː.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Depress
.– For this word, the first “e” is long, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dee-PREHS//diː.ˈpɹɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Depressants
.– For this word, the first “e” is long, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dee-PREHS-ihn-ts//diː.ˈpɹɛs.ə(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a separate syllable –

 

Depressed
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa,, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /də-PREHS-[t]//də.ˈpɹɛs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Depressing
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa,, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-PREH-sing//dəˈpɹɛ.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Depth
.– For this word, the “e” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/deh[p]-th//de[p].θ/ – Notice also that and that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Deputy
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “p” is pronounced almost like the letter “b”, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/DEH‘-pyou-dee//ˈdɛ.pju.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Derive
.– For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/də-RAIV//də.ˈraiːv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Derogatory
.– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is short, the “g” is hard, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for “-ory” suffix – the “o” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-RAH-guh-tohr-ee//də.ˈɹɑ.gə(ʌ).toɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Descend
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “sc” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s”, the second “e” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/dih-SEHN-[d]//də(ɪ).ˈsɛn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Describe
.– For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “i” is long, the “b” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/də-SKRAI[B]//də.ˈskraiː[b]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Describing
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “c” is hard, and the first “i” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /də-SKRAI-bing//də.ˈskɹaiː.bɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Description
.– For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the first “i” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də.SKRIH[P]-shihn//də.ˈskɹɪ[p].ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Desensitize
.– For this word, the first “e” is long, the second “e” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dee-SEHN-sih-taiz/ – /diː.ˈsɛn.sə(ɪ).taiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Desert
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the second “e” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /DEH-z’r-[t]/ – /ˈdɛ.zɚ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Deserted
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the second “e” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

– /də-Z’R-dih[d]//də.ˈzɚ.ɾə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Deserve
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the second “e” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

– /də-Z’RV//də.ˈzɚv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Design
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is long, and the “g” is silent

– /də-ZAIN/ – /də.ˈzaiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Designated
.– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard but is virtually stopped, the “a” is a True Long A, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but (usually) stopped

/DEH-sih-nay-dih[d]//ˈdɛ.zə(ɪ)g.ne.ɾə(ɪ)ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Designed
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is long, the “g” is silent, and since the root-word, ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

– /də-ZAIN-d//də.ˈzaiːn.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Designer
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is long, the “g” is silent, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /də-ZAI-n’r//də.ˈzaiː.nɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Designing
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the first “i” is long, the “g” is silent, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dee-ZAI-ning//diːˈzaiː.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Designs
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is long, the “g” is silent, and the final “s” also is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /də-ZAIN-z//dəˈzaiːn.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Desire
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter”z”, and for the “-ire” combination – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /də-ZIGH-yr//də.zʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Desk
.– For this word, the “e” is short

/dehs-k//dɛs.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Desperate
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DEHS-prih[t]//ˈdɛs.pɹə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Despite
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/də-SPIGH-[t]//də.ˈspʌiː.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Dessert
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced like the letter “z” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the second “e” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /də-Z’R-[t]/ – /də.zɚ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Destined
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/DEHS-tihn-[d]/ – /ˈdɛs.tə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Destiny
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/DEHS-tih-nee/ – /ˈdɛs.tə(ɪ).niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Destroy
.– For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “toy” or “boy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-CHROY//də(ɪ)s.ˈtʃɹoiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Destruction
.– For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-CHRUHK-shihn//də(ɪ)s.ˈtʃɹʌk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Detail
.– For this word, the “e” is long, and, the “ai” combination is pronounced like theLong “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it)

/DEE-tayl//ˈdiː.teɪl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Detailed
.– For this word, the “e” is long, t, the “ai” combination is pronounced like theLong “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and since the root-word ends with the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/DEE-tayl.[d]//ˈdiː.teɪl.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the flap-d ending acts as a third syllable

 

Details
 – For this word, the “e” is long,, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/DEE-taylz/ – /ˈdiː.teɪlz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Determination
.– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” disappears, the first “i” is and i-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-t’r-mih-NAY-shihn//də.ˌtɚ.mə(ɪ).ˈneiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Determine
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” disappears, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/də-T’R-mihn//də.ˈtɚ.mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Determined
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” disappears, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/də-T’R-mihn-d/ – /də.ˈtɚ.mə(ɪ)n.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Deterrent
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-T’R-ihn[t]//də.ˈtɚ.ə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Detonation
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the first “t” is (usually) turns into a glottal stop, the “o” turns into an i-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /deh-[t]ih-NAY-shuhn//dɛ[t].ə(ɪ).ˈneiː.ʃə(ʌ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

 

Detour
.– For this word, the “e” is long, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”

– /DEE-too-‘r//ˈdiː.tu.ɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “r” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Detractors
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/də-TRæK-t’r-z/ – /də.ˈtɹæk.tɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Detrimental
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “e” is short, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/deh-chrih-MEHN-təl//ˌdɛ.tʃɹə(ɪ).ˈmɛn.təl/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Develop
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the second “e” is short, and the “o” tuns into a u-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

– /də-VEH-luh-[p]//də.ˈvɛ.lə(ʌ).[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Developed
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “p” is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “p” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /də-VEH-luh[p]-[t]//də.ˈvɛ.lə(ʌ)[p].[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Developing
.– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-VEH-lə-ping//də.ˈvɛ.lə.pɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Development
.– For this word, the first “e” turns into an true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “p” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-VEH-luh[p]-mihn-[t]//də.ˈvɛ.lə(ʌ)[p].mən.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Developments
 – For this word, The first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “p” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa

– /də-VEH-luh[p]-mihn-[t]s/ – /də.ˈvɛ.lə(ʌ)[p].mə(ɪ)n.[t]s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (even when the “t” is stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

 

Develops
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the second “e” is short, and the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

– /də-VEH-luh-[p]s/ – /də.vɛ.lə(ʌ).[p]s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ps” ending (even when the “p” is stopped acts as a fourth syllable

 

Device
.– For this word, the first “e” turns into an true-schwa, and for the “-ice” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-VIGHS//də.ˈvʌiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Devise
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/dee-VAIZ//diː.ˈvaiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Devised
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/dee-VAIZ-d//diː.ˈvaiːz.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Devote
.– For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/dih-VOH[T]//də(ɪ).ˈvo[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Devoted
.– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/də-VOH-dih[d]//də.ˈvo.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Devout
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ou” is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /də-VOW-[t]/ – /də.ˈvau.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

 

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter D ) –


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