– American English Pronunciation–

– ( Letter D:  Dg, Dh, Di ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Dd

 

Da – Dc . Dc – Df . Dh . Di . Dj – Dl . Dm – Do . Dp – Dr . Ds – Du . Dv – Dz

 

Dh

Dhaka
 – For this word, the Dh combination is pronounced like the soft “g”, the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/dʒAH-kah//ˈdʒɑ.kɑ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Di

 

Diabetes
 – For this word, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “e” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “e” is long, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/dai-yuh-BEE-deez//daiː.jə(ʌ).ˈbiː.ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Diagnose
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “o” is short, and the final “e” is silent

– /dai-ih[g]-NOHS//daiː.ə(ɪ)[g].ˈnos/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

 

Diagnostics
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “o” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dai-ih[g]-NAHS-tih-ks//daiː.ə(ɪ)[g].nɑs.tə(ɪ).ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Diagram
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the first “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, and the second “a” is short

/DAI-ih-græm/ – /ˈdaiː.ə(ɪ).gɹæm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Diamond
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “a” disappears, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/DAI-mihn-[d]/ – /ˈdaiː.mə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Diaper
 – For this word, the “ia” combination is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “p” is pronounce almost like the letter “b”, and the “e” disappears

/DIGH-p’r/ – /ˈdʌiː.pɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Diary
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/DAI-uh-ree//ˈdaiː.ə(ʌ).ɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the firs syllable

 

Dice
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/dighs//dʌiːs/

 

Dichotomy
.– For this word, the “i” is long, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the first “o” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “o” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/dai-KAH-duh-mee//daiː.ˈkɑ.ɾə(ʌ).miː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Dictator
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-d, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dihk-TAY-d’r-z/ – /dɪk.ˈte.ɾəɹ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Dictatorial
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is long, and for the “-ial” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dih[k]-tuh-TOHR-ee-əl//ˌdɪ[k].tə(ʌ).ˈtoɹ.iː.əl/ – Notice also that there is s a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable  –

 

Dictators
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-d, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /dihk-TAY-d’r-z/ – /dɪk.ˈte.ɾəɹ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

 

Dictatorship
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-d, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ship” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /dihk-TAY-d’r-shi[p]/ – /dɪk.ˈte.ɾəɹ.ʃɪ[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Dictatory
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “c” is (often) stopped, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for “-ory” suffix – the “o” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DIH[K]-tuh-tohr-ee/ – /ˈdɪ[k].tə(ʌ).toɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Dictionaries
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)the “a” is aLong “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/DIH[K]-shihn-ayr-eez//ˈdɪ[k].ʃə(ɪ)n.eɪɹ.iːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Dictionary
.– For this word, the “i” is short, the “c” is hard, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DIH[K]-shih-nayr-ee//ˈdɪk.ʃə(ɪ).neɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Did
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/dih[d]//ˈdɪ[ɾ]/

 

Didn’t
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the second “d” is a flap-d, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the second “d” and the “n”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/DIH-dən-[t]//ˈdɪ.ɾən.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Die
 – For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/dai//daiː/

 

Died
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the long letter “i” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/dai-[d]//daiː.[d]/ – Notice also and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Diesel
 – For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the second “e” turns into a true-schwa

/DEE-səl//ˈdiː.səl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Diet
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/DAI-ih[t]//ˈdaiː.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Diethylene
.– For this word, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “e” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the first “e” is short, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “y” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/dai-YEH-thə-leen//daiː.ˈjɛ.θə.liːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Diets
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/DAI-ih-ts//ˈdaiː.ə(ɪ).ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Difference
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f”, the first “e” disappears, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DIHF-rihns//ˈdɪf.ɹə(ɪ)ns/ – Notice also that and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Differences
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” disappears,and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the third “e” merges with the “-es” ending and turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/DIHF-rihn-sihz/ – /ˈdɪf.ɹə(ɪ)n.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Different
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)the first “e” disappears, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /DIH-frihn-[t]//ˈdɪ.fɹə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Differentiate
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dih-f’r-EHN-shee-ay[t]//dɪ.fɚ.ˈɛn.ʃiː.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

 

Differentiation
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dih-f’r-ehn-shee-AY-shihn//dɪ.fɚ.ɛn.ʃiː.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fifth syllable –

 

Difficult
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second letter “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /DIH-fih-kuhl-[t]//ˈdɪ.fə(ɪ).kə(ʌ)l.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Difficulties
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second letter “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /DIH-fih-kuhlt-teez//ˈdɪ.fə(ɪ).kə(ʌ)l.tiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Difficulty
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/DIH-fih-kuhl-tee//ˈdɪ.fə(ɪ).kə(ʌ)l.tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Diffuse
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the “e” is silent

/dih-FYOO-zihz/ – /də(ɪ).ˈfju.zə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Diffuses
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/dih-FYOO-zihz/ – /də(ɪ).ˈfju.zə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Dig
.– For this word, the “i” is short, and the “g” is hard

/dihg//dɪg/

 

Digress
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dai-GREHS/ – /daiː.ˈgɹɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable – 

 

Dilemma
 – For this word, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “e” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

– /dih-LEH-muh//də(ɪ).lɛmə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Diminish
 – For this word, the first “i” turns into a true-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /də-MIH-nihsh//də.ˈmɪ.nə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Diminished
 – For this word, the first “i” turns into a true-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the “sh” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /də-MIH-nihsh-[t]//də.ˈmɪ.nə(ɪ)ʃ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Diminishes
 – For this word, the first “i” turns into a true-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /də-MIH-nih-shihz//də.ˈmɪ.nə(ɪ).ʃə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Diner
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DAI-n’r/ – /ˈdaiː.nɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Dining
 – For this word, the first “i” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /DAI-ning//ˈdaiː.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Dinner
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /DIH-n’r//ˈdɪ.nɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Dinosaur
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “au” combination is pronounced like the long letter “o”

/DAI-nuh-sohr/ – /ˈdaiː.nə(ʌ).soɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Diploma
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “o” is long, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

– /dih-PLOH-muh//də(ɪ).ˈplo.mə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Diplomatic
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dih-plə--dik//də(ɪ).ˈplə.mæ.ɾə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Diplomatically
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dih-plə--dih-klee//də(ɪ).ˈplə.mæ.ɾə(ɪ)k.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Direct
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced either long or as a true-schwa, the “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/dai-REH[K]-t/ – /daiː.ˈɹɛ[k].t/ – Or – /də-REH[K]-t//də.ˈɹɛ[k].t/ – Notice also that in both versions, the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Direction
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced either long, or as a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dai-REHK-shihn//daiː.ˈrɛk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ –  OR  – /də-REHK-shihn//də.ˈrɛk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Directions
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced either long or as a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/dai-REHK-shihn-z//daiː.ˈrɛk.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/–  OR  /də-REHK-shihn-z//də.ˈɹɛk.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

 

Directly
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced either long, or as a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dai-REHK-[t]-lee//daiː.ˈrɛk.[t].liː/–  OR  /də-REHK-[t]-lee//də.ˈɹɛk.[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Director
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced either long or as a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d” (this is due to the placement of the letter “c” directly before it), and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /də-REHK-d’r//də.ˈɹɛk.dɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Dirt
 – For this word, the “i” disappears, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/d’r[t]/ – /dɚ[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped)  acts as a second syllable

 

Dirtiest
 – For this word, the “i” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is pronounced like the single long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “e” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /D’R-dee-yis.[t]//ˈdɚ.ɾiː.jə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable –

 

Dirty
 – For this word, the “i” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /D’R-dee//ˈdɚ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Disable
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/dihs-AY-bəl//də(ɪ)s.ˈeiː.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Disabled
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/dihs-AY-bəl-[d]//də(ɪ)s.ˈeiː.bəl.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Disadvantage
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “a” turns into an true-schwa, the second “d” is (often) stopped, the second “a” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dihs-ə[d]-VæN-[t]ih-dʒ//də(ɪ)s.ə[d].ˈvæn.[t]ə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Disadvantages
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “a” turns into an true-schwa, the second “d” is (often) stopped, the second “a” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and since the word is plural – the “e” merges with the “-es” ending turns into an i-schwa, the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /dihs-ə[d]-VæN-[t]ih-dʒihz//də(ɪ)s.ə[d].ˈvæn.[t]ə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

 

Disagree
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-ə-GREE//də(ɪ)s.ə.ˈgɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Disagreement
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-ə-GREE-mihn-[t]/ – /də(ɪ)s.ə.ˈgɹiː.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

 

Disappear
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/dihs-uh-PEER//ˌdə(ɪ)s.ə(ʌ).ˈpiːɹ/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Disappoint
.– For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” turns into a u-schwa,the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination(this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/dihs-uh-POYN-[t]//ˌdə(ɪ)s.ə(ʌ).ˈpoiːn.[t]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Disappointed
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

/dihs-uh-POYN-tih[d]/ – /ˌdə(ɪ)s.ə(ʌ).ˈpoiːn.tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

 

Disappointing
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-uh-POYN-ting//ˌdə(ɪ)s.ə(ʌ).ˈpoiːn.tɪŋ/ –Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

 

Disappointment
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-uh-POYN-[t]-mihn[t]//ˌdə(ɪ)s.ə(ʌ).ˈpoiːn.[t].mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

 

Disapproval
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-uh-PROO-vəl//ˌdə(ɪ)s.ə(ʌ).ˈpɹu.vəl/– Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Disapprove
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the final “e” is silent

/dihs-uh-PROOV//ˌdə(ɪ)s.ə(ʌ).ˈpɹuv/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Disapproving
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-uh-PROOV-ing//ˌdə(ɪ)s.ə(ʌ).ˈpɹu.ving/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Disaster
 – For this word, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the first “s” is pronounced like a “z”, the “a” is short, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dih-ZæS-t’r//də(ɪ).ˈzæs.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Disastrous
 – For this word, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the first “s” is pronounced like a “z”, the “a” is short, for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dih-ZæS-t’r-ihs//də(ɪ).ˈzæs.tɚ.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Disasters
 – For this word, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the first “s” is pronounced like a “z”, the “a” is short, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /dih-ZæS-t’r-z//də(ɪ).ˈzæs.tɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Disc
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “c” is hard

/dihs-k//dɪs.k/ – Notice also that the hard “c” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Disciplinary
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “c” is silent, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the third “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DIH-sih-plih-nayr-ee//ˈdɪ.sə(ɪ).plə(ɪ).neɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Discipline
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “c” is silent, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the third “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/DIH-sih-plihn//ˈdɪ.sə(ɪ).plə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Disciplined
 – For this word, the “first “i” is short, the “c” is silent, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the third “i” is an i-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/DIH-sih-plihn-[d]//ˈdɪ.sə(ɪ).plə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Disciplines
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “c” is silent, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the third “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/DIH-sih-plihn-z/ – /ˈdɪ.sə(ɪ).plə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Disciplining
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “c” is silent, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the third “i” is an i-schwa, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DIH-sih-plih-ning/ – /ˈdɪ.sə(ɪ).plə(ɪ).nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Discomfort
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the first “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the second “o” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/dihs-KUHM-f’r-t/ – /də(ɪ)s.ˈkʌm.fɚ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Disconcerting
 – For this word, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the first “c” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the second “c” is soft, the “e” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dihs-kuhn-S’R-ding//də(ɪ)s.kə(ʌ)n.ˈsɚ.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

 

Discount
.– For this word, the “i” is short, the “c” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/DIHS-cown-[t]//ˈdɪs.kaun.[t]/ – Notice also that and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Discourage
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ou” combination disappears, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dihs-K’R-ih-dʒ//də(ɪ)s.kɚ.ə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Discouraged
.– For this word, the “i” is short, the “c” is hard, the “ou” combination disappears, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the soft letter “g” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dihs-C’R-ih-dʒ-[t]//dɪs.ˈkəɹ.ɪ.dʒ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

 

Discourteous
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ou” combination disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” is long, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-K’R-dee-ihs//də(ɪ)s.ˈkɚ.ɾə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Discover
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-KUH-v’r//də(ɪ)s.ˈkʌ.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Discovered
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/dihs-KUH-v’r-[d]//də(ɪ)s.ˈkʌ.vɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

 

Discovery
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and for the “-ery” suffix – the “e” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-KUH-v’r-ee//də(ɪ)s.ˈkʌ.vɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Discreet
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /dihs-KREE-[t]//də(ɪ)s.ˈkɹiː.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable  –

 

Discrepancies
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “c” is hard, the “e” is is short, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the second “c” is soft, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/dih-SKREH-pihn-seez/ – /də(ɪ).ˈskɹɛ.pə(ɪ)n.siːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Discrete
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the first “e” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /dihs-KREE-[t]//də(ɪ)s.ˈkɹiː.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable  –

 

Discretionary
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “e” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-KREH-shihn-ayr-ee//də(ɪ)s.ˈkɹɛ.ʃə(ɪ)n.eɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Discrimination
.– For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the second “i” is short, the third “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-krih-mih-NAY-shihn//də(ɪ)s.ˌkrɪ.mə(ɪ)ˈneiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Discriminatorily
 – For this word, the first “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the second “i” is short, the third “i” is also short, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is long, and for the “-ily” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dihs-krih-mih-nuh-TOHR-ih-lee//də(ɪ)s.ˌkɹɪ.mɪ.nə(ʌ).ˈtoɹ.ə(ɪ).liː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fifth syllable

 

Discuss
 – For this word, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “u” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /dihs-KUHS//də(ɪ)s.ˈkʌs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Discussed
 – For this word, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “u” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /dihs-KUHS-[t]//də(ɪ)s.ˈkʌs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Discussion
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard but is pronounced almost like the hard letter “g”, the “u” is short, the “ssi” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/dihs-GUH-shihn/ – /də(ɪ)s.ˈgʌ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Discussions
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard but is pronounced almost like the hard letter “g”, the “u” is short, the “ssi” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /dihs-GUH-shihn-z/ – /də(ɪ)s.ˈgʌ.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

 

Disease
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the second “s” also is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

– /dih-ZEEZ//də(ɪ).ˈziːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Disguise
.– For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “G” is hard, the “ui” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/dihs-GAIZ//də(ɪ)s.ˈgaiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Disgust
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard but is pronounced almost like the letter “k”, the “u” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/dihs-KUHS-[t]//də(ɪ)s.ˈkʌs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Disgusted
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard but is pronounced almost like the letter “k”, the “u” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/dihs-KUHS-dih[d]//də(ɪ)s.ˈkʌs.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the flap-d ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Disgusting
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “g” is hard but is pronounced almost like the letter “k”, the “u” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dis-GUHS-ding/ – /dɪs.ˈgʌs.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Dish
 – For this word, and for the “-ish” combination – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “sh” combination is un-voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/dihsh//dɪʃ/

 

Dishonest
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “h” is silent, the “o” is short, and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-AH-nihs-[t]//də(ɪ)s.ˈɑ.nə(ɪ)s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Disillusioned
.– For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is long, for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/dihs-ih-LOO-zhihn-[d]/ – /dɪs.ə(ɪ).ˈlu.ʒə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

Disk
 – For this word, the “i” is short

/dihs-k//dɪs.[k]/ – Notice also that and that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Dislike
.– For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/dihs-LIGHK//də(ɪ)s.ˈlʌiːk/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “k” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Dismiss
.– For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-MIHS//də(ɪ)s.ˈmɪs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Dismissed
.– For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is also short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /dihs-MIHS-[t]/ – /də(ɪ)s.ˈmɪs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Disorder
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “O” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “e” disappears

/dihs-OHR-d’r//də(ɪ)s.ˈoɹ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Displaced
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/dihs-PLAY-st/ – /də(ɪ)s.ˈpleiː.sts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Display
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwathe “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-PLAY//də(ɪ)s.ˈpleiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Displeased
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the second “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/dihs-PLEEZ-d/ – /də(ɪ)s.ˈpliːz.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Disposable
.– For this word, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “p” is pronounced almost like the letter “b”, the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and for the “able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-POH-zə-bəl/ – /də(ɪ)s.ˈpo.zə.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Disproportionate
.– For this word, the “i” is short, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is long for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-prə-POHR-shihn-ih[t]//ˌdɪs.pɹə.ˈpoɹ.ʃə(ɪ)n.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and the major stress is on the third syllable –

 

Dispute
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/dihs-PYOO[T]//də(ɪ)sˈpju[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Dissolve
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “z”, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/dih-ZAWL-v//də(ɪ).ˈzɔl.v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Distance
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DIHS-tihn-s//ˈdɪs.tə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Distilled
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /dihs-TIHL-[d]//də(ɪ).ˈstɪl.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Distinguish
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “in” combination is pronounced like in the “ing” combination (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “g” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the letter “w”, and for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “sh” combination is un-voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-TING-gwihsh//də(ɪ)s.ˈtɪŋ.gwə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Distorted
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “e” of the “-ed” ending is an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/dih-STOHR-dih[d]//də(ɪ).ˈstoɹ.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Distortion
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “o” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dih-STOHR-shihn//də(ɪ).ˈstoɹ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Distract
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped

/dihs-CHRæ[K]-t//də(ɪ)sˈtʃɹæ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Distraction
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, and the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-CHRæ[K]-shihn//də(ɪ)sˈtʃɹæ[k].ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Distractions
.– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, and the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is  pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/dihs-CHRæ[K]-shihn-z//də(ɪ)sˈtʃɹæ[k].ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

 

Distressed
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/dihs-CHREH-st//də(ɪ)sˈtʃɹɛ.st/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Distribute
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /dihs-CHRIH-byoo-[t]//də(ɪ)s.ˈtʃɹɪ.bju.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Distributed
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

/dihs-CHRIH-byoo-tih[d]//də(ɪ)sˈtʃɹɪ.bju.tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Distributing
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-CHRIH-byoo-ting//də(ɪ)sˈtʃɹɪ.bju.tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Distribution
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dihs-chrih-BYOU-shihn//ˌdɪs.tʃɹə(ɪ).ˈbju.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the main stress is on the third syllable –

 

Distributor
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dihs-CHRIH-byou-d’r//də(ɪ)s.tʃɹɪ.bju.ɾəɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

District
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/DIHS-chrih[k]-[t]//ˈdɪs.tʃɹə(ɪ)[k].[t]/ – Notice also that and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Disturb
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “u” disappears, and the final “b” is (often) stopped

/dihs-T’R[B]//də(ɪ)s.ˈtɚ[b]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Disturbing
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwathe “u” disappears, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-T’R-bing//də(ɪ)s.ˈtɚ.bɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Dive
 – For this word, the “i” is long and the final “e” is silent

/daiv//daiːv/

 

Diverse
.– For this word, the “i” is long, the first “e” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/dai-V’RS//daiː.ˈvɚs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Diversification
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “e” disappears, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the third “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dai-v’r-sih-fih-KAY-shihn/ – /daiː.ˌvɚ.sə(ɪ).fə(ɪ).ˈkeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and the major stress is on the fifth syllable –

 

Diversified
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the first “e” disappears, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the third “i” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “i” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/dih-V’R-sih-fai-[d]//də(ɪ).ˈvɚ.sə(ɪ).faiːɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Diversity
 – For this word, the first “i” can be pronounced either pronounced long, or as an i-schwa, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dai-V’R-sih-dee//daiː.ˈvɚ.sə(ɪ).ɾiː/ –  Or  – /dih-V’R-sih-dee//də(ɪ).ˈvɚ.sə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that in both versions the stress is on the second syllable

 

Divide
 – For this word, the “i” is a true-schwa, the second “i” is long, the second “d” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/də-VAI[D]//də.ˈvaiː[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Divided
 – For this word, the first “i is an i-schwa, the second “i” is long, the second “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

– /dih-VAI-dih[d]//də(ɪ).vaiː.ɾə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Divider
 – For this word, the first “i” turns into an i-schwa, the second “i” is long, the second “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-VAI-d’r/ – /də.ˈvaiː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Diving
 – For this word, the first “i” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DAI-ving//ˈdaiː.vɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Division
 – For this word, the first “i” turns into a true-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /də-VIH-zhihn//də.ˈvɪ.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Divorce
 – For this word, the “i” is a true-schwa, the “o” is long, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/də-VOHRS//də.ˈvoɹs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Divorced
 – For this word, the “i” is a true-schwa, the “o” is long, the “c” is soft, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the soft letter “c” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/də-VOHR-st//də.ˈvoɹ.st/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Divorces
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the “c” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/dih-VOHR-sihz//də(ɪ)ˈvoɹ.sɪz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

 

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter D ) –


Jump To…

Aa . Bb . Cc . Dd . Ee . Ff . Gg . Hh . Ii . Jj . Kk . Ll . Mm . Nn . Oo . Pp . Qq . Rr . Ss . Tt . Uu . Vv . Ww . Xx . Yy . Zz
Numbers

 


 

Explore GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!

Leave a Reply