– American English Pronunciation–

– ( Letter D:  Dp, Dq, Dr ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily. The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Dd

 

Da – Dc . Dd – Df . Dg – Di . Dj – Dl . Dm – Do . Dq . Dr . Ds – Du . Dv – Dz

 

Dq

 

Dr

Dracula
 – For this name, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “a” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/dʒRæ-kyoo-luh//ˈdʒɹæ.kju.lə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Draft
.– For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/dʒræf-[t]//ˈdʒɹæf.[t]/ – Notice also that and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Drag
.– For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, the “g” is hard

/dʒræg//ˈdʒɹæg/

 

Drama
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the second “a” turns into a u-schwa

/dʒRAH-muh//ˈdʒɹɑmə(ʌ)/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Dramatic
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒrə--dih[k]//dʒɹə.ˈmæ.ɾə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Dramatically
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “c” is hard (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dʒruh--dihk-lee//dʒɹə(ʌ).ˈmæ.ɾə(ɪ)k.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Drastically
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “a” is short, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “c” is hard (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒRæ-stihk-lee//ˈdʒɹæ.stə(ɪ)k.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Draw
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “aw” combination is pronounced like in the word “law” and “draw” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/dʒraw//ˈdʒɹɔ/

 

Drawback
.– For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “aw” combination is pronounced like in the word “law” or “draw” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” – but at the end of a word is it (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/dʒrAW-bæ[k]//ˈdʒɹɔ.bæ[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

 

Drawbacks
.– For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “aw” combination is pronounced like in the word “law” or “draw” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/dʒrAW-bæ-ks//ˈdʒɹɔ.bæ.ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Drawer
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “aw” combination is pronounced like the long letter “o”, and the “e” disappears

/dʒrohr//ˈdʒɹoɹ/

 

Drawing
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒrAW-ing//ˈdʒɹɔ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Dread
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /dʒreh-[d]/ – /ˈdʒrɛ.[ɾ]/ –

 

Dreaded
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the second “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

– /dʒREH-də(ɪ)-[d]/ – /ˈdʒrɛ.ɾə(ɪ).[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Dream
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/dʒreem//dʒɹiːm/

 

Dreamed
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “m” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

– /dʒreem-d//dʒɹiːm.d/ – Notice also and that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Dreary
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /dʒREER-ee//ˈdʒɹiːɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Drenched
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “e” is short, and since the root-word ends with the “ch” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/dʒREHN-ch-[t]//ˈdʒɹɛn.tʃɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “ch” & “t” endings act as separate syllables

 

Dress
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/dʒrehs//ˈdʒɹɛs/

 

Dressed
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/dʒrehs-[t]//dʒɹɛs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Dressing
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒREH-sing/ – /ˈdʒɹɛ.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Drew
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “ew” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/dʒroo//dʒɹu/

 

Drill
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/dʒrihl/ – /dʒɹɪl/ –

 

Drink
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it)

/dʒring-k//ˈdʒɹɪŋ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Drinkable
.– For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒRINGK-ə-bəl//dʒɹɪŋk.ə.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Drive
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

– /dʒraiv//dʒɹaiːv/ 

 

Driven
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is short, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒRIH-vihn//ˈdʒɹɪ.və(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Driver
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is long, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒRAI-v’r//ˈdʒɹaiː.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Driving
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “i” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dʒRAI-ving//ˈdʒɹaiː.vɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Drop
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/dʒrah-[p]//ˈdʒɹɑ.[p]/ – Notice that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Dropped
 – For this word the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) but is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “p” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

– /dʒrah[p]-t//dʒɹɑ[p].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable –

 

Dropping
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒRAH-ping//ˈdʒɹɑ.pɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Drought
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “gh” combination is silent, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /dʒrow-[t]//dʒɹau.[t]/ – notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Drove
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/dʒrohv/ – /dʒɹov/ –

 

Drown
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “how”, or “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and (with most people’s pronunciation) there is a phantom letter “d” at the end but it is almost stopped (this is not necessarily “correct” but is a product of the evolution of pronunciation as it feels more natural to transition from this to another word with the phantom “d” at the end of the word)

/dʒrown-[d]/ – /dʒɹaun.[d]/ –

 

Drowning
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “now” or “how” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is (often) a phantom letter “d” in-between the “w” and the “n” (this is not necessarily “correct” but is a product of the evolution of pronunciation as it feels more natural to transition from this to another word with the phantom “d” at the end of the word), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒROWN-[d]ing/ – /ˈdʒɹaun.[d]ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Drug
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, and the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped

/dʒruh[g]//ˈdʒɹʌ[g]/

 

Drugstore
.– For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, the “g” is hard but is almost stopped, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/dʒRUH[G]-stohr//ˈdʒɹʌ[g].stoɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Drum
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “u” is short

/dʒruhm//dʒɹʌm/

 

Drunk
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), and the final “k” is (sometimes) stopped

/dʒruhng-k//ˈdʒɹʌŋ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Dry
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/dʒrai//ˈdʒɹaiː/ – Notice also that and that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

 

 

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter D ) –


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