– American English Pronunciation–

– ( Letter D ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Dd

 

De . Dh . Di . Do . Dr . Du . Dy

 

Dad
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

/dæ[d]/ – /dæ[d]/ –

Daily
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DAY-lee/ – /ˈdeɪ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Dairy
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong  (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /DAYR-ee//ˈdeɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Dakar
 – For this word, the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/dah-KAHR//dɑ.ˈkɑɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Damage
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /DæM-ihdʒ//ˈdæ.mə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Damaged
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the soft “g” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and according to the rules, the “d” should be pronounced as normal…  However, when spoken, it sounds, naturally, more like a “t”… but, then, is (often) stopped

– /-Mih-dʒ-[t]/ – /ˈdæ.mɪdʒ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Damages
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and since the word is plural – the “e” merges with the “-es” ending and turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /DæM-ih-dʒihz/ – /ˈdæ.mə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Damn
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “n” is silent

/dæm/ – /dæm/ –

Damnable (Damn-able)
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “n” is NOT silent (as it is in root-word, without the suffix), and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DæM-nuh-bəl/ – /ˈdæm.nə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Damnation
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dæm-NAY-shihn/ – /dæm.ˈneiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Damned
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “n” is silent, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

– /dæm-d/ – /dæm.d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable –

Damning
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “n” is silent, and the “ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /DæM-ing/ – /ˈdæm.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Damp
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/dæm-[p]/ – /dæm.[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” ending acts as a second syllable –

Damsel
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “e” disappears

– /DæM-s’l//ˈdæm.səl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Dance
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /dæn-s/ – /dæn.s/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable –

Danced
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “c” is soft, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /dæn-s[t]/ – /dæn.s[t]/ – Notice also that the “st” ending (even when the “t” is stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Dancer
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “c” is soft, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DæN-s’r/ – /dæn.sɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Dances
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “c” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

– /DæN-sihz/ – /ˈdæn.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Dancing
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “c” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DæN-sing/ – /ˈdæn.sɪŋ/ –

Dander
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DæN-d’r//ˈdæn.dɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Danger
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “n” is pronounced normally (the placement of the letter “g” directly after it does not affect its pronunciation in any way), the “g” is soft, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DAYN-dʒ’r/ – /ˈdeiːn.dʒɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Dangerous
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /DAYN-dʒ’r-ihs//ˈdeiːn.dʒɚ.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Dare
 – For this word, the “a” is aLong “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/dayr/ – /deɪɹ/ –

Dark
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/dahr-k/ – /dɑɹ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable –

Dart
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the “t” is (often) stopped

– /dar-[t]//dɑɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Data
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

– /-duh//dæ.ɾə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Date
 – For this word, and for the “-ate” ending – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/day-[t]/ – /de.[t]/ –

Daughter
 – For this word, the “augh” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DAW-d’r/ – /ˈdɔ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Day
 – For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/day/ – /deiː/ –

Daytime (Day-time)
– This compound word is pronounced like two separate words:  , the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

– /DAY-taim//ˈdeiː.taiːm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

De

De Facto
 – This term is pronounced like a single word:  The “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, and the “o” is long

/də-FæK-doh/ – /də.ˈfæk.do/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Dead
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/deh[d]/ – /dɛ[ɾ]/ –

Deadline (Dead-line)
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the second “d” is (usually) stopped, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

– /DEH[D]-lain//ˈdɛ[d].laiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Deadlines (Dead-lines)
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the second “d” is (usually) stopped, the “i” is long, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /DEH[D]-lain-z//ˈdɛ[d].laiːn.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Deadly
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the second “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DEH[D]-lee/ – /ˈdɛ[ɾ].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Deaf
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”

/dehf/ – /dɛf/ –

Deal
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/deel/ – /diːl/ –

Dealer
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dee-l’r/ – /diː.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Dealt
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /dehl-[t]//dɛl.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Dear
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

– /deer//diːɹ/

Death
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the single short letter “e”, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/dehth//dɛθ/

Debate
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dee-BAY-[t]//diː.ˈbe.t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Debating
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /də-BAY-ding//də.ˈbeiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Debilitating
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-BIH-lih-tay-ding//də.ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ).te.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Debris
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e” and the final “s” is silent

– /də-BREE//də.ˈbɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Debt
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “b” is silent, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /deh-[t]/ – /dɛ-[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Debts
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “b” is silent,

– /deh-ts/ – /dɛ.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable –

Debunk (de-Bunk)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “u” is short, and the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it)

/dee-BUHNG-k//diː.ˈbʌŋ.k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “k” ending acts as a third syllable

Debut
 – For this word, the “e” is pronounced like the True Long “A”, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the final “t” is silent

– /day-BYOO//de.ˈbju/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Decade
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /DEH-kay[d]//ˈdɛ.ke[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Decadent
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DEH-kə-dihn-[t]/ – /ˈdɛ.kə.ɾə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Decades
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “d” is (often) stopped, the second “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /DEH-kay-[d]z//ˈdɛ.ke.[d]z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable  and that the “dz” ending (even when the “d” is stopped) acts as a third syllable

Decaffeinated
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the first “a” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ei” combination is pronounced like the single i-schwa, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/dih--fih-nay-dihd//də(ɪ).ˈkæ.fə(ɪ).ne.ɾə(ɪ)ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Decay
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/dee-KAY/ – /diː.ˈkeiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

December
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, and the third “e” disappears

/dee-SEHM-b’r/ – /diː.ˈsɛm.bɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Decentralized (de-Central-ize-ed)
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “C” is soft, the second “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/dee-SEHN-chrəl-aiz-[d]//diː.ˈsɛn.tʃɹəl.aiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

Decide
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “c” is soft, the “i” is long, the “d” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /dee-SAI-[d]/ – /diː.ˈsaiː.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Decided
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “c” is soft, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

– /dee-SAI-dih[d]/ – /diː.ˈsaiː.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Decile
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is soft, and for the “-ile” suffix – the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is the product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DEH-sai-yl//ˈdɛ.saiː.jl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Decision
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the first “i” is short, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dee-SIH-zhuhn//diː.ˈsɪ.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Decisions
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the first “i” is short, for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /dee-SIH-zhuhn-z/ – /diː.ˈsɪ.ʒə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Deck
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/deh-k//dɛ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Declare
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

– /dee-KLAYR//diː.kleɪɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Declared
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “a” is aLong “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /dee-KLAYR-[d]//diː.kleɪɹ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable –

Decline
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/dee-KLAIN/ – /diː.ˈklaiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Decommissioned (de-Commissioned)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is short, the “ssi” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the second “o” also turns into an i-schwa, and since the root-word ends in the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /dee-kuh-MIH-shihn-[d]//diː.kə(ʌ).mɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

Decorate
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DEH-kuh-ray[t]/ – /ˈdɛ.kə(ʌ).ɹe[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Decorated
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is is a flap-t,  and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/DEH-kuh-ray-dih[d]/ – /ˈdɛ.kə(ʌ).ɹe.də(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Decoration
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” disappearsthe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/deh-kuhr-AY-shihn/ – /dɛ.kə(ʌ).ɹˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Decorative
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” disappears, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DEH-kruh-tihv/ – /ˈdɛ.kɹə(ʌ).tɪv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Decrease
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “e” is silent

/dee-KREES/ – /diː.ˈkɹiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Decreasing
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dee-KREE-sing/ – /diː.ˈkɹiːsɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Deductive
 – For this word, the first “e” is turns into an i-schwa, the “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dih-DUH[K]-tihv//də(ɪ).ˈdʌ[k].tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Deed
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /dee[d]//diː[d]/

Deeds
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “d” is (often) stopped, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /dee[d]-z//diː[d].z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable –

Deem
– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/deem//diːm/

Deemed
– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/deem-[d]//diːm.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

Deep
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/dee[p]//diː[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” ending acts as a second syllable –

Deepening
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DEE-pih-ning//ˈdiː.pə(ɪ).nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Deeply
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DEEP-lee/ – /ˈdiːp.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Deer
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/deer//diːɹ/

Deface (de-Face)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/dee-FAYS//diː.ˈfeiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Defaced (de-Face-ed)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/dee-FAYS-[t]//diː.ˈfeiːs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Defeat
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/də-FEE-[t]/ – /də.ˈfiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Defective
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dih-FEH[K]-tihv//də(ɪ).ˈfɛ[k].tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Defend
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, and the second “e” is short

/dee-FEHN-d/ –/diː.ˈfɛn.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable –

Defender
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the second “e” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dee-FEHN-d’r//diː.ˈfɛn.dɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Defense – [to an attack]
 – For this word, the first “e” turns intoa true-schwa, the second “e” is short, and the final “e” is silent

– /də-FEHN-s/ – /də.ˈfɛn.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

Defense – [in sports]
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the second “e” is short, and the final “e” is silent

– /DEE-fehn-s/ – /ˈdiː.fɛn.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

Defenseless (Defense-less)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the third “e” disappears, and for the “-less” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dee-FEHNS-lihs/ – /ˈdiː.fɛns.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Defiant
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “i” is long, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dee-FAI-ihn-[t]/ – /diː.ˈfaiː.ə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Deficit
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/DEH-fih-sih[t]//ˈdɛ.fə(ɪ).sə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Define
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

– /dee-FAIN//diː.ˈfaiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Defined
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “i” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

– /də-FAIN-d//də.ˈfaiːn.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable –

Definite
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/DEH-fih-nih[t]/ – /ˈdɛ.fə(ɪ).nɪ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Definitely
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, the second “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DEH-fih-nih[t]-lee/ – /ˈdɛ.fə(ɪ).nɪ[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Definition
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/deh-fih-NIH-shihn/ – /ˌdɛ.fə(ɪ).ˈnɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

Deform (de-Form)
– For this word, the “e” is long, and the “o” is long

/dee-FOHR-m/ – /diː.ˈfoɹ.m/ – Notice also that the “m” acts as a third syllable –

Deformities (de-Form-ities)
– For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “o” is long, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/də-FOHR-mih-deez/ – /də.ˈfoɹ.mə(ɪ).ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Deformity (de-Form-ity)
– For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “o” is long, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the
final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/də-FOHR-mih-dee/ – /də.ˈfoɹ.mə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Degree
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “g” is hard, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/də-GREE/ – /də.ˈgɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Degrees
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced (almost) like the letter “z”

/də-GREEZ/ – /də.ˈgɹiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Delay
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /dee-LAY/ – /diː.ˈleiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Delayed
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “a” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/də-LAY[D]//də.ˈleiː[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Delegate
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is stopped, and the “e” is silent

/DEH-lih-gay[t]//ˈdɛ.lə(ɪ).ge[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Delete
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the second “e” is long, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/dee-LEE[T]//diː.ˈliː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Deliberate
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “i” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-LIH-b’rih[t]//də.lɪ.bɹə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Deliberately
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-LIH-b’rih[t]-lee//də.ˈlə(ɪ).bɹə(ɪ)[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Delicate
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /DEHL-ih-kih[t]//ˈdɛ.lə(ʌ).kɪ(ə)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Delicious
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the first “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-LIH-shihs//dəˈlɪ.ʃə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Delight
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “right” or “fight” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/dee-LIGH[T]//diː.ˈlʌiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Delighted
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “right” or “fight” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/dee-LIGH-tih[d]//diː.ˈlʌiː.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Deliver
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, and the second “e” disappears

/də-LIH-v’r/ – /də.ˈlɪ.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Delivered
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the second “e” disappears, and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /də-LIH-v’r[d]//də.ˈlɪ.vɚ[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Delivering
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue),  and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring”(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-LIH-v’r-ing//də.ˈlɪ.vɚ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Delivery
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, and for the “-ery” suffix – the “e” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-LIH-v’r-ee/ – /də.ˈlɪ.vɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Delusion
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-LOO-zhihn//də.ˈlu.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Demand
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the “a” is short

/də-MæN-d/ – /də.ˈmæn.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable –

Demise
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

– /də-MAIZ//də.ˈmaiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Democratic
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /deh-muh-KRæ-dih[k]/ – /dɛ.mə(ʌ).ˈkɹæ.ɾə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Democracy
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “o” is short, the first “c” is hard, and for the “-acy” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /də-MAH-krə-see//də.ˈmɑ.kə.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Demographic
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “a” is short, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/deh-mə-GRæ-fih[k]//dɛ.mə.ˈgɹæ.fə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the main stress is on the third syllable

Demonstrate
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DEH-mihn-s-chray[t]/ – /ˈdɛ.mə(ɪ)n.s.tʃɹe[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Demoted
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/dee-MOH-dih[d]//diː.ˈmo.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Demutualizations (de-Mutual-ize-ations)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the first “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the second “u” is long, for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /dee-myoo-choo-uh-lai-ZAY-shuhn-z//diː.ˌmju.ə(ʌ).laiː.ˈzeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllablethe major stress is on the sixth syllable and that the “z” ending acts a an eight syllable –

Denied
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “i” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the long letter “i” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/dee-NAI[D]/ – /diː.ˈnaiː[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Dent
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /DEHN-[t]//ˈdɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Dented
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

– /DEHN-tih[d]//ˈdɛn.tə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Dentist
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DEHN-tihs-[t]//ˈdɛn.tə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Denver
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, and the second “e” disappears

– /DEHN-v’r//ˈdɛn.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Deny
 – For this word, the “e” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/dee-NAI//diːˈnaiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Department
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dee-PAHR[T]-mihn-[t]//diːˈpɑɹ[t].mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Departure
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dee-PAHR-ch’r//diː.ˈpɑɹ.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Depend
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, and the second “e” is short

/də-PEHN-d//də.ˈpɛn.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

Dependent
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the second “e” is short, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dee-PEHN-dihn-[t]//diː.ˈpɛn.də(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Deposit
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “o” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/də-PAH-sih[t]//də.ˈpɑ.zə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Depot
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “o” is long, and the “t” is silent

– /DEE-poh//ˈdiː.po/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Depreciate
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is long, the “c” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-PREE-shee-ay[t]//də.ˈpɹiː.ʃiː.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Depress
– For this word, the first “e” is long, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dee-PREHS//diː.ˈpɹɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Depressants
– For this word, the first “e” is long, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dee-PREHS-ihn-ts//diː.ˈpɹɛs.ə(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a separate syllable –

Depressed
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa,, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /də-PREHS-[t]//də.ˈpɹɛs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Depressing
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa,, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-PREH-sing//dəˈpɹɛ.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Depth
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/deh[p]-th//de[p].θ/ – Notice also that and that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable

Deputy
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “p” is pronounced almost like the letter “b”, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/DEH‘-byou-dee//ˈdɛ.bju.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Derive
– For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/də-RAIV//də.ˈraiːv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Derogatory
– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is short, the “g” is hard, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for “-ory” suffix – the “o” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-RAH-guh-tohr-ee//də.ˈɹɑ.gə(ʌ).toɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Descend
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “sc” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s”, the second “e” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/dih-SEHN-[d]//də(ɪ).ˈsɛn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Describe
– For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “i” is long, the “b” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/də-SKRAI[B]//də.ˈskraiː[b]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Describing
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “c” is hard, and the first “i” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /də-SKRAI-bing//də.ˈskɹaiː.bɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Description (de-Script-tion)
– For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the first “i” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də.SKRIH[P]-shihn//də.ˈskɹɪ[p].ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Desensitize (de-Sense-itize)
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the second “e” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dee-SEHN-sih-taiz/ – /diː.ˈsɛn.sə(ɪ).taiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Desert
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the second “e” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /DEH-z’r-[t]/ – /ˈdɛ.zɚ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Deserted
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the second “e” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

– /də-Z’R-dih[d]//də.ˈzɚ.ɾə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Deserve
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the second “e” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

– /də-Z’RV//də.ˈzɚv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Design
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is long, and the “g” is silent

– /də-ZAIN/ – /də.ˈzaiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Designated
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard but is virtually stopped, the “a” is a True Long A, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but (usually) stopped

/DEH-sih-nay-dih[d]//ˈdɛ.zə(ɪ)g.ne.ɾə(ɪ)ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Designed
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is long, the “g” is silent, and since the root-word, ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

– /də-ZAIN-d//də.ˈzaiːn.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

Designer
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is long, the “g” is silent, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /də-ZAI-n’r//də.ˈzaiː.nɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

Designing
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the first “i” is long, the “g” is silent, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dee-ZAI-ning//diːˈzaiː.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Designs
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is long, the “g” is silent, and the final “s” also is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /də-ZAIN-z//dəˈzaiːn.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

Desire
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter”z”, and for the “-ire” combination – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /də-ZIGH-yr//də.zʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Desk
– For this word, the “e” is short

/dehs-k//dɛs.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Desperate
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DEHS-prih[t]//ˈdɛs.pɹə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Despite
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/də-SPIGH-[t]//də.ˈspʌiː.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Dessert
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced like the letter “z” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the second “e” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /də-Z’R-[t]/ – /də.zɚ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Destined
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/DEHS-tihn-[d]/ – /ˈdɛs.tə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

Destiny
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/DEHS-tih-nee/ – /ˈdɛs.tə(ɪ).niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Destroy
– For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “toy” or “boy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-CHROY//də(ɪ)s.ˈtʃɹoiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Destruction
– For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-CHRUHK-shihn//də(ɪ)s.ˈtʃɹʌk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Detail
– For this word, the “e” is long, and, the “ai” combination is pronounced like theLong “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it)

/DEE-tayl//ˈdiː.teɪl / – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Detailed
– For this word, the “e” is long, t, the “ai” combination is pronounced like theLong “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and since the root-word ends with the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/DEE-tayl.[d]//ˈdiː.teɪl.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the flap-d ending acts as a third syllable

Details
 – For this word, the “e” is long,, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/DEE-taylz/ – /ˈdiː.teɪlz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Determination
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” disappears, the first “i” is and i-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-t’r-mih-NAY-shihn//də.ˌtɚ.mə(ɪ).ˈneiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Determine
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” disappears, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/də-T’R-mihn//də.ˈtɚ.mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Determined
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” disappears, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/də-T’R-mihn-d/ – /də.ˈtɚ.mə(ɪ)n.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Deterrent
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-T’R-ihn[t]//də.ˈtɚ.ə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Detonation
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the first “t” is (usually) turns into a glottal stop, the “o” turns into an i-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /deh-[t]ih-NAY-shuhn//dɛ[t].ə(ɪ).ˈneiː.ʃə(ʌ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Detour (de-Tour)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”

– /DEE-too-‘r//ˈdiː.tu.ɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “r” ending acts as a third syllable

Detractors
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/də-TRæK-t’r-z/ – /də.ˈtɹæk.tɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Detrimental
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “e” is short, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/deh-chrih-MEHN-təl//ˌdɛ.tʃɹə(ɪ).ˈmɛn.təl/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Develop
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the second “e” is short, and the “o” tuns into a u-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

– /də-VEH-luh-[p]//də.ˈvɛ.lə(ʌ).[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Developed
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “p” is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “p” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /də-VEH-luh[p]-[t]//də.ˈvɛ.lə(ʌ)[p].[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Developing
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard
pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-VEH-lə-ping//də.ˈvɛ.lə.pɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Development
– For this word, the first “e” turns into an true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “p” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-VEH-luh[p]-mihn-[t]//də.ˈvɛ.lə(ʌ)[p].mən.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fifth syllable

Developments
 – For this word, The first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “p” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa

– /də-VEH-luh[p]-mihn-[t]s/ – /də.ˈvɛ.lə(ʌ)[p].mə(ɪ)n.[t]s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (even when the “t” is stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

Develops
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the second “e” is short, and the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

– /də-VEH-luh-[p]s/ – /də.vɛ.lə(ʌ).[p]s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ps” ending (even when the “p” is stopped acts as a fourth syllable

Device
– For this word, the first “e” turns into an true-schwa, and for the “-ice” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-VIGHS//də.ˈvʌiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Devise
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/dee-VAIZ//diː.ˈvaiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Devised
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/dee-VAIZ-d//diː.ˈvaiːz.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

Devote
– For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/dih-VOH[T]//də(ɪ).ˈvo[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Devoted
– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/də-VOH-dih[d]//də.ˈvo.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Devout
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ou” is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /də-VOW-[t]/ – /də.ˈvau.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Dh

Dhaka
 – For this word, the Dh combination is pronounced like the soft “g”, the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/dʒAH-kah//ˈdʒɑ.kɑ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Di

Diagnose
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “o” is short, and the final “e” is silent

– /dai-ih[g]-NOHS//daiː.ə(ɪ)[g].nos/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Diagnostics
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “o” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dai-ih[g]-NAHS-tih-ks//daiː.ə(ɪ)[g].nɑs.tə(ɪ).ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a fifth syllable

Diagram
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the first “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, and the second “a” is short

/DAI-ih-græm/ – /ˈdaiː.ə(ɪ).gɹæm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Diamond
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “a” disappears, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/DAI-mihn-[d]/ – /ˈdaiː.mə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

Diaper
 – For this word, the “ia” combination is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “p” is pronounce almost like the letter “b”, and the “e” disappears

/DIGH-p’r/ – /ˈdʌiː.pɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Diary
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/DAI-uh-ree//ˈdaiː.ə(ʌ).ɹiː / – Notice also that the stress is on the firs syllable

Dice
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/dighs//dʌiːs/

Dichotomy
– For this word, the “i” is long, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the first “o” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “o” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/dai-KAH-duh-mee//daiː.ˈkɑ.ɾə(ʌ).miː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Dictator
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-d, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dihk-TAY-d’r-z/ – /dɪk.ˈte.ɾəɹ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Dictatorial
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is long, and for the “-ial” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dih[k]-tuh-TOHR-ee-əl//ˌdɪ[k].tə(ʌ).ˈtoɹ.iː.əl/ – Notice also that there is s a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable  –

Dictators
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-d, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /dihk-TAY-d’r-z/ – /dɪk.ˈte.ɾəɹ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Dictatorship
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-d, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ship” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /dihk-TAY-d’r-shi[p]/ – /dɪk.ˈte.ɾəɹ.ʃɪ[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Dictatory
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “c” is (often) stopped, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for “-ory” suffix – the “o” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DIH[K]-tuh-tohr-ee/ – /ˈdɪ[k].tə(ʌ).toɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Dictionaries
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)the “a” is aLong “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/DIH[K]-shihn-ayr-eez//ˈdɪ[k].ʃə(ɪ)n.eɪɹ.iːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Dictionary
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “c” is hard, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DIH[K]-shih-nayr-ee//ˈdɪk.ʃə(ɪ).neɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Did
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/dih[d]//ˈdɪ[ɾ]/

Didn’t
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the second “d” is a flap-d, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the second “d” and the “n”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/DIH-dən-[t]//ˈdɪ.ɾən.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Die
 – For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/dai//daiː/

Died
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the long letter “i” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/dai-[d]//daiː.[d]/ – Notice also and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Diesel
 – For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the second “e” turns into a true-schwa

/DEE-səl//ˈdiː.səl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Diet
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/DAI-ih[t]//ˈdaiː.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Diethylene
– For this word, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “e” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the first “e” is short, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “y” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/dai-YEH-thə-leen//daiː.ˈjɛ.θə.liːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Diets
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/DAI-ih-ts//ˈdaiː.ə(ɪ).ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

Difference
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f”, the first “e” disappears, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DIHF-rihns//ˈdɪf.ɹə(ɪ)ns/ – Notice also that and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable

Differences
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” disappears,and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the third “e” merges with the “-es” ending and turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/DIHF-rihn-sihz/ – /ˈdɪf.ɹə(ɪ)n.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Different
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)the first “e” disappears, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /DIH-frihn-[t]//ˈdɪ.fɹə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Differentiate
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dih-f’r-EHN-shee-ay[t]//dɪ.fɚ.ˈɛn.ʃiː.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Differentiation
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dih-f’r-ehn-shee-AY-shihn//dɪ.fɚ.ɛn.ʃiː.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fifth syllable –

Difficult
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second letter “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /DIH-fih-kuhl-[t]//ˈdɪ.fə(ɪ).kə(ʌ)l.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Difficulties
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second letter “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /DIH-fih-kuhlt-deez//ˈdɪ.fə(ɪ).kə(ʌ)l.diːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Difficulty
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/DIH-fih-kuhl-tee//ˈdɪ.fə(ɪ).kə(ʌ)l.tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Diffuse
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the “e” is silent

/dih-FYOO-zihz/ – /də(ɪ).ˈfju.zə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Diffuses
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/dih-FYOO-zihz/ – /də(ɪ).ˈfju.zə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Dig
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the “g” is hard

/dihg//dɪg/ – Notice also that –

Digress
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dai-GREHS/ – /daiː.ˈgɹɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable – 

Dilemma
 – For this word, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “e” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

– /dih-LEH-muh//də(ɪ).lɛmə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Diminish
 – For this word, the first “i” turns into a true-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /də-MIH-nihsh//də.ˈmɪ.nə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Diminished
 – For this word, the first “i” turns into a true-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the “sh” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /də-MIH-nihsh-[t]//də.ˈmɪ.nə(ɪ)ʃ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Diminishes
 – For this word, the first “i” turns into a true-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /də-MIH-nih-shihz//də.ˈmɪ.nə(ɪ).ʃə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Diner
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DAI-n’r/ – /ˈdaiː.nɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Dining
 – For this word, the first “i” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /DAI-ning//ˈdaiː.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Dinner
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /DIH-n’r//ˈdɪ.nɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Dinosaur
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “au” combination is pronounced like the long letter “o”

/DAI-nuh-sohr/ – /ˈdaiː.nə(ʌ).soɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Diploma
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “o” is long, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

– /dih-PLOH-muh//də(ɪ).ˈplo.mə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Diplomatic
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dih-plə--dik//də(ɪ).ˈplə.mæ.ɾə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Diplomatically
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dih-plə--dih-klee//də(ɪ).ˈplə.mæ.ɾə(ɪ)k.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Direct
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced either long or as a true-schwa, the “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/dai-REH[K]-t/ – /daiː.ˈɹɛ[k].t/ – Or – /də-REH[K]-t//də.ˈɹɛ[k].t/ – Notice also that in both versions, the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Direction
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced either long, or as a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dai-REHK-shihn//daiː.ˈrɛk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ –  OR  – /də-REHK-shihn//də.ˈrɛk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Directions
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced either long or as a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/dai-REHK-shihn-z//daiː.ˈrɛk.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/–  OR  /də-REHK-shihn-z//də.ˈɹɛk.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Directly
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced either long, or as a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dai-REHK-[t]-lee//daiː.ˈrɛk.[t].liː/–  OR  /də-REHK-[t]-lee//də.ˈɹɛk.[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Director
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced either long or as a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d” (this is due to the placement of the letter “c” directly before it), and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /də-REHK-d’r//də.ˈɹɛk.dɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Dirt
 – For this word, the “i” disappears, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/d’r[t]/ – /dɚ[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped)  acts as a second syllable

Dirty
 – For this word, the “i” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /D’R-dee//ˈdɚ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Disable (dis-Able)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/dihs-AY-bəl//də(ɪ)s.ˈeiː.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Disabled (dis-Abled)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/dihs-AY-bəl-[d]//də(ɪ)s.ˈeiː.bəl.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Disadvantage (dis-Advantage)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “a” turns into an true-schwa, the second “d” is (often) stopped, the second “a” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dihs-ə[d]-VæN-[t]ih-dʒ//də(ɪ)s.ə[d].ˈvæn.[t]ə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a fifth syllable

Disadvantages (dis-Advantages)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “a” turns into an true-schwa, the second “d” is (often) stopped, the second “a” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and since the word is plural – the “e” merges with the “-es” ending turns into an i-schwa, the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /dihs-ə[d]-VæN-[t]ih-dʒihz//də(ɪ)s.ə[d].ˈvæn.[t]ə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Disagree (dis-Agree)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-ə-GREE//də(ɪ)s.ə.ˈgɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Disagreement (dis-Agreement)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the
final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-ə-GREE-mihn-[t]/ – /də(ɪ)s.ə.ˈgɹiː.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

Disappear (dis-Appear)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/dihs-uh-PEER//ˌdə(ɪ)s.ə(ʌ).ˈpiːɹ/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Disappoint (dis-Appoint)
– For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” turns into a u-schwa,the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination(this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/dihs-uh-POYN-[t]//ˌdə(ɪ)s.ə(ʌ).ˈpoiːn.[t]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Disappointed (dis-Appointed)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

/dihs-uh-POYN-tih[d]/ – /ˌdə(ɪ)s.ə(ʌ).ˈpoiːn.tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

Disappointing (dis-Appointing)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-uh-POYN-ting//ˌdə(ɪ)s.ə(ʌ).ˈpoiːn.tɪŋ/ –Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

Disappointment (dis-Appointment)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-uh-POYN-[t]-mihn[t]//ˌdə(ɪ)s.ə(ʌ).ˈpoiːn.[t].mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

Disapproval (dis-Approval)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-uh-PROO-vəl//ˌdə(ɪ)s.ə(ʌ).ˈpɹu.vəl/– Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Disapprove (dis-Approve)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the final “e” is silent

/dihs-uh-PROOV//ˌdə(ɪ)s.ə(ʌ).ˈpɹuv/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Disapproving (dis-Approving)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-uh-PROOV-ing//ˌdə(ɪ)s.ə(ʌ).ˈpɹu.ving/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Disaster
 – For this word, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the first “s” is pronounced like a “z”, the “a” is short, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dih-ZæS-t’r//də(ɪ).ˈzæs.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Disastrous
 – For this word, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the first “s” is pronounced like a “z”, the “a” is short, for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dih-ZæS-t’r-ihs//də(ɪ).ˈzæs.tɚ.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Disasters
 – For this word, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the first “s” is pronounced like a “z”, the “a” is short, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /dih-ZæS-t’r-z//də(ɪ).ˈzæs.tɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Disc
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “c” is hard

/dihs-k//dɪs.k/ – Notice also that the hard “c” ending acts as a second syllable

Disciplinary
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “c” is silent, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the third “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DIH-sih-plih-nayr-ee//ˈdɪ.sə(ɪ).plə(ɪ).neɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Discipline
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “c” is silent, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the third “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/DIH-sih-plihn//ˈdɪ.sə(ɪ).plə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Disciplined
 – For this word, the “first “i” is short, the “c” is silent, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the third “i” is an i-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/DIH-sih-plihn-[d]//ˈdɪ.sə(ɪ).plə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Disciplines
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “c” is silent, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the third “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/DIH-sih-plihn-z/ – /ˈdɪ.sə(ɪ).plə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Disciplining
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “c” is silent, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the third “i” is an i-schwa, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DIH-sih-plih-ning/ – /ˈdɪ.sə(ɪ).plə(ɪ).nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Discomfort (dis-Comfort)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the first “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the second “o” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/dihs-KUHM-f’r-t/ – /də(ɪ)s.ˈkʌm.fɚ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Disconcerting
 – For this word, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the first “c” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the second “c” is soft, the “e” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dihs-kuhn-S’R-ding//də(ɪ)s.kə(ʌ)n.ˈsɚ.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Discount (dis-Count)
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “c” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/DIHS-cown-[t]//ˈdɪs.kaun.[t]/ – Notice also that and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Discourage (dis-Courage)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ou” combination disappears, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dihs-K’R-ih-dʒ//də(ɪ)s.kɚ.ə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Discouraged (dis-Courage-ed)
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “c” is hard, the “ou” combination disappears, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the soft letter “g” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dihs-C’R-ih-dʒ-[t]//dɪs.ˈkəɹ.ɪ.dʒ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

Discourteous (dis-Courteous)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ou” combination disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” is long, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-K’R-dee-ihs//də(ɪ)s.ˈkɚ.ɾə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Discover (dis-cover)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-KUH-v’r//də(ɪ)s.ˈkʌ.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Discovered (dis-cover-ed)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/dihs-KUH-v’r-[d]//də(ɪ)s.ˈkʌ.vɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Discovery (dis-Cover-y)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and for the “-ery” suffix – the “e” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-KUH-v’r-ee//də(ɪ)s.ˈkʌ.vɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Discreet
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /dihs-KREE-[t]//də(ɪ)s.ˈkɹiː.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable  –

Discrepancies
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “c” is hard, the “e” is is short, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the second “c” is soft, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/dih-SKREH-pihn-seez/ – /də(ɪ).ˈskɹɛ.pə(ɪ)n.siːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Discrete
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the first “e” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /dihs-KREE-[t]//də(ɪ)s.ˈkɹiː.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable  –

Discretionary
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “e” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-KREH-shihn-ayr-ee//də(ɪ)s.ˈkɹɛ.ʃə(ɪ)n.eɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Discrimination
– For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the second “i” is short, the third “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-krih-mih-NAY-shihn//də(ɪ)s.ˌkrɪ.mə(ɪ)ˈneiː.ʃə(ɪ)n / – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Discriminatorily
 – For this word, the first “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the second “i” is short, the third “i” is also short, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is long, and for the “-ily” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dihs-krih-mih-nuh-TOHR-ih-lee//də(ɪ)s.ˌkɹɪ.mɪ.nə(ʌ).ˈtoɹ.ə(ɪ).liː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fifth syllable

Discuss
 – For this word, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “u” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /dihs-KUHS//də(ɪ)s.ˈkʌs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Discussed
 – For this word, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “u” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /dihs-KUHS-[t]//də(ɪ)s.ˈkʌs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Discussion
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard but is pronounced almost like the hard letter “g”, the “u” is short, the “ssi” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/dihs-GUH-shihn/ – /də(ɪ)s.ˈgʌ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Discussions
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard but is pronounced almost like the hard letter “g”, the “u” is short, the “ssi” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /dihs-GUH-shihn-z/ – /də(ɪ)s.ˈgʌ.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Disease (dis-Ease)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the second “s” also is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

– /dih-ZEEZ//də(ɪ).ˈziːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Disguise (dis-Guise)
– For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “G” is hard, the “ui” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/dihs-GAIZ//də(ɪ)s.ˈgaiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Disgust (dis-Gust)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard but is pronounced almost like the letter “k”, the “u” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/dihs-KUHS-[t]//də(ɪ)s.ˈkʌs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Disgusted (dis-Gust-ed)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard but is pronounced almost like the letter “k”, the “u” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/dihs-KUHS-dih[d]//də(ɪ)s.ˈkʌs.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the flap-d ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Disgusting (dis-Gust-ing)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “g” is hard but is pronounced almost like the letter “k”, the “u” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dis-GUHS-ding/ – /dɪs.ˈgʌs.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Dish
 – For this word, and for the “-ish” combination – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “sh” combination is un-voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/dihsh//dɪʃ/

Dishonest (dis-Honest)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “h” is silent, the “o” is short, and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-AH-nihs-[t]//də(ɪ)s.ˈɑ.nə(ɪ)s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Disillusioned (dis-Illusion-ed)
– For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is long, for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/dihs-ih-LOO-zhihn-[d]/ – /dɪs.ə(ɪ).ˈlu.ʒə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

Disk
 – For this word, the “i” is short

/dihs-k//dɪs.[k]/ – Notice also that and that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Dislike (dis-Like)
– For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/dihs-LIGHK//də(ɪ)s.ˈlʌiːk/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “k” ending acts as a third syllable

Dismiss (dis-Miss)
– For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-MIHS//də(ɪ)s.ˈmɪ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Dismissed (dis-Miss-ed)
– For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is also short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /dihs-MIHS-[t]/ – /də(ɪ)s.ˈmɪs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Disorder (dis-Order)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “O” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “e” disappears

/dihs-OHR-d’r//də(ɪ)s.ˈoɹ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Displaced (dis-Place-ed)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/dihs-PLAY-st/ – /də(ɪ)s.ˈpleiː.sts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable –

Display
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwathe “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-PLAY//də(ɪ)s.ˈpleiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Displeased (dis-Please-ed)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the second “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/dihs-PLEEZ-d/ – /də(ɪ)s.ˈpliːz.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Disposable (dis-Pose-able)
– For this word, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “p” is pronounced almost like the letter “b”, the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and for the “able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-POH-zə-bəl/ – /də(ɪ)s.ˈpo.zə.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Disproportionate (dis-Proportion-ate)
– For this word, the “i” is short, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is long for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-prə-POHR-shihn-ih[t]//ˌdɪs.pɹə.ˈpoɹ.ʃə(ɪ)n.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and the major stress is on the third syllable –

Dispute
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/dihs-PYOO[T]//də(ɪ)sˈpju[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Dissolve (dis-Solve)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “z”, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/dih-ZAWL-v//də(ɪ).ˈzɔl.v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Distance
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DIHS-tihns//ˈdɪs.tə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable

Distilled
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /dihs-TIHL-[d]//də(ɪ).ˈstɪl.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Distinguish
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “in” combination is pronounced like in the “ing” combination (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “g” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the letter “w”, and for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “sh” combination is un-voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-TING-gwihsh//də(ɪ)s.ˈtɪŋ.gwə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Distorted
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “e” of the “-ed” ending is an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/dih-STOHR-dih[d]//də(ɪ).ˈstoɹ.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Distortion
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “o” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dih-STOHR-shihn//də(ɪ).ˈstoɹ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Distract (dis-Tract)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped

/dihs-CHRæ[K]-t//də(ɪ)sˈtʃɹæ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable –

Distraction (dis-Traction)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, and the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-CHRæ[K]-shihn//də(ɪ)sˈtʃɹæ[k].ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Distractions (dis-Traction-s)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, and the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is  pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/dihs-CHRæ[K]-shihn-z//də(ɪ)sˈtʃɹæ[k].ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Distressed
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/dihs-CHREH-st//də(ɪ)sˈtʃɹɛ.st/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Distribute
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /dihs-CHRIH-byoo-[t]//də(ɪ)s.ˈtʃɹɪ.bju.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Distributed
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

/dihs-CHRIH-byoo-tih[d]//də(ɪ)sˈtʃɹɪ.bju.tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a fifth syllable

Distributing
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-CHRIH-byoo-ting//də(ɪ)sˈtʃɹɪ.bju.tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Distribution
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dihs-chrih-BYOU-shihn//ˌdɪs.tʃɹə(ɪ).ˈbju.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the main stress is on the third syllable –

Distributor
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dihs-CHRIH-byou-d’r//də(ɪ)s.tʃɹɪ.bju.ɾəɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

District
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/DIHS-chrih[k]-[t]//ˈdɪs.tʃɹə(ɪ)[k].[t]/ – Notice also that and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Disturb
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “u” disappears, and the final “b” is (often) stopped

/dihs-T’R[B]//də(ɪ)s.ˈtɚ[b]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Disturbing
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwathe “u” disappears, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dihs-T’R-bing//də(ɪ)s.ˈtɚ.bɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Dive
 – For this word, the “i” is long and the final “e” is silent

/daiv//daiːv/

Diverse
– For this word, the “i” is long, the first “e” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/dai-V’RS//daiː.ˈvɚs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Diversification
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “e” disappears, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the third “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dai-v’r-sih-fih-KAY-shihn/ – /daiː.ˌvɚ.sə(ɪ).fə(ɪ).ˈkeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and the major stress is on the fifth syllable –

Diversified
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the first “e” disappears, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the third “i” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “i” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/dih-V’R-sih-fai-[d]//də(ɪ).ˈvɚ.sə(ɪ).faiːɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Diversity
 – For this word, the first “i” can be pronounced either pronounced long, or as an i-schwa, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dai-V’R-sih-dee//daiː.ˈvɚ.sə(ɪ).ɾiː/ –  Or  – /dih-V’R-sih-dee//də(ɪ).ˈvɚ.sə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that in both versions the stress is on the second syllable

Divide
 – For this word, the “i” is a true-schwa, the second “i” is long, the second “d” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/də-VAI[D]//də.ˈvaiː[d] / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Divided
 – For this word, the first “i is an i-schwa, the second “i” is long, the second “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

– /dih-VAI-dih[d]//də(ɪ).vaiː.ɾə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Divider
 – For this word, the first “i” turns into an i-schwa, the second “i” is long, the second “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/də-VAI-d’r/ – /də.ˈvaiː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Diving
 – For this word, the first “i” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DAI-ving//ˈdaiː.vɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Division
 – For this word, the first “i” turns into a true-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /də-VIH-zhihn//də.ˈvɪ.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Divorce
 – For this word, the “i” is a true-schwa, the “o” is long, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/də-VOHRS//də.ˈvoɹs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Divorced
 – For this word, the “i” is a true-schwa, the “o” is long, the “c” is soft, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the soft letter “c” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/də-VOHR-st//də.ˈvoɹ.st/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a third syllable

Divorces
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the “c” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/dih-VOHR-sihz//də(ɪ)ˈvoɹ.sɪz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Do

Do
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”

/doo//du/

Doctor
 – For this word, the first “o” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DAH[K]-t’r//ˈdɑ[k].tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Document
– For this word,  the “o” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DAH-kyoo-mihn[t]//ˈdɑ.kju.mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Documentaries
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination, the “a” disappears, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /dah-kyou-MEHN-chreez//ˌdɑ.kju.ˈmɛn.tʃɹiːz/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

Documentary
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination, the “a” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /dah-kyou-MEHN-chree//ˌdɑ.kju.ˈmɛn.tʃɹiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

Documentation
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “e” turns into an i-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dah-kyou-mihn-TAY-shihn//dɑ.kju.mə(ɪ)n.ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fourth syllable –

Documents
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa

– /DAH-kyou-mihn-ts//ˈdɑ.kju.mə(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Does
 – For this word, the “oe” combination is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

– /duhz//dʌz/

Doesn’t
 – For this word, the “oe” combination is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

– /DUH-zihn-[t]//ˈdʌ.zə(ɪ).[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Dog
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “g” is (sometimes) stopped

/daw[g]//dɔ[g]/

Dollar
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “a” disappears

– /DAH-l’r//ˈdɑ.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Dollars
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l”(this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/DAH-l’r-z//ˈdɑ.lɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Dollop
 – For this word, the first “o” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l”(this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/DAH-luh[p]//ˈdɑ.lə(ʌ)[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Dome
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/dohm//dom/

Domestic
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard

/də-MEHS-tih[k]//də.ˈmɛs.tə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Dominance
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DAH-mih-nihn-s//ˈdɑ.mə(ɪ).nə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Dominate
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DAH-mih-nay[t]//ˈdɑ.mə(ɪ).ne[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Door
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the single long letter “o” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/dohr//doɹ/

Dot
 – For this word, the “o” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/dah[t]//dɑ[t]/

Double
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the short letter “u”, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

– /DUH-bəl//ˈdʌ.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Doubled
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the short letter “u”, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /DUH-bəl-[d]/ – /ˈdʌ.bəl.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Doubles
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the short letter “u”, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /DUH-bəl-z//ˈdʌ.bəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Doubt
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “b” is silent, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /dow-[t]//dau.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Doubting
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “b” is silent, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /DOW-ding/ /ˈdau.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Doubts
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the “b” is silent

– /dow-ts/ – /dau.ts/ – Notice also and that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

Doughnut
 – For this word, the “ough” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, the second “u” is short, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/DOH-nuh[t]/ – /ˈdo.nʌ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Down
 – For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “how” and “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/down//dɑun/

Download
 – For this word, the “ow” is pronounced like in the word “how” and “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /DOWN-loh[d]//ˈdaun.lo[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Downloading
 – For this word, the “ow” is pronounced like in the word “how” and “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /DOWN-loh-ding//ˈdaun.lo.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Downsizing
 – For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “now” or “how” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DOWN-sai-zing//ˈdɑun.saiː.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Downstairs
– For this word, the “ow” is pronounced like in the word “how” and “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ai” combination is pronounced like theLong “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z” 

/down-STAYR-z//dɑun.ˈsteɪɹ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Downtown
 – For this word, the first “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “how” and “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the second “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “how” and “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) 

/down-town//dɑun.tɑun/ – Notice also that there is no discernible word-stress –

Downturn
 – This word is pronounced like two separate words, the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “how” and “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “u” disappears

/DOWN-t’rn//ˈdɑun.tɚn/

Downward
 – For this word, the “ow” is pronounced like in the word “how” and “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ward” suffix, the “a” disappears, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DOWN-w’r-[d]//ˈdɑun.wɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Downwards
 – For this word, the “ow” is pronounced like in the word “how” and “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ward” suffix, the “a” disappears, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/DOWN-w’r-dz//ˈdɑun.wɚ.ɾz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “dz” ending acts as a third syllable –

Dozen
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DUH-zihn//ˈdʌ.zə(ɪ)n/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Dr

Dracula
 – For this name, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “a” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/dʒRæ-kyoo-luh//ˈdʒɹæ.kju.lə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Draft
– For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/dʒræf-[t]// ˈdʒɹæf.[t]/ – Notice also that and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Drag
– For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, the “g” is hard

/dʒræg//ˈdʒɹæg/

Drama
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the second “a” turns into a u-schwa

/dʒRAH-muh//ˈdʒɹɑmə(ʌ)/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Dramatic
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒrə--dih[k]//dʒɹə.ˈmæ.ɾə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Dramatically
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “c” is hard (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dʒruh--dihk-lee//dʒɹə(ʌ).ˈmæ.ɾə(ɪ)k.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Drastically
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “a” is short, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “c” is hard (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒRæ-stihk-lee//ˈdʒɹæ.stə(ɪ)k.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Draw
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “aw” combination is pronounced like in the word “law” and “draw” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/dʒraw//ˈdʒɹɔ/

Drawback (draw-back)
– For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “aw” combination is pronounced like in the word “law” or “draw” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” – but at the end of a word is it (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/dʒrAW-bæ[k]//ˈdʒɹɔ.bæ[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Drawbacks (draw-back-s)
– For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “aw” combination is pronounced like in the word “law” or “draw” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/dʒrAW-bæ-ks//ˈdʒɹɔ.bæ.ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a third syllable –

Drawer
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “aw” combination is pronounced like the long letter “o”, and the “e” disappears

/dʒrohr//ˈdʒɹoɹ/

Drawing
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒrAW-ing//ˈdʒɹɔ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Dread
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /dʒreh-[d]/ – /ˈdʒrɛ.[ɾ]/ –

Dreaded
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the second “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

– /dʒREH-də(ɪ)-[d]/ – /ˈdʒrɛ.ɾə(ɪ).[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Dream
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/dʒreem//dʒɹiːm/

Dreamed
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “m” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

– /dʒreem-d//dʒɹiːm.d/ – Notice also and that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

Dreary
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /dʒREER-ee//ˈdʒɹiːɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Drenched
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “e” is short, and since the root-word ends with the “ch” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/dʒREHN-ch-[t]//ˈdʒɹɛn.tʃɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “ch” & “t” endings act as separate syllables

Dress
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/dʒrehs//ˈdʒɹɛs/

Dressed
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/dʒrehs-[t]//dʒɹɛs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Dressing
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒREH-sing/ – /ˈdʒɹɛ.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Drill
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/dʒrihl/ – /dʒɹɪl/ –

Drink
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it)

/dʒring-k//ˈdʒɹɪŋ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Drinkable (Drink-able)
– For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒRINGK-ə-bəl//dʒɹɪŋk.ə.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Drive
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

– /dʒraiv//dʒɹaiːv/ 

Driven
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is short, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒRIH-vihn//ˈdʒɹɪ.və(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Driver
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is long, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this
suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒRAI-v’r//ˈdʒɹaiː.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Driving
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “i” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dʒRAI-ving//ˈdʒɹaiː.vɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Drop
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/dʒrah-[p]//ˈdʒɹɑ.[p]/ – Notice that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Dropped
 – For this word the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) but is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “p” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

– /dʒrah[p]-t//dʒɹɑ[p].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable –

Dropping
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒRAH-ping//ˈdʒɹɑ.pɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Drought
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “gh” combination is silent, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /dʒrow-[t]//dʒɹau.[t]/ – notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Drove
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/dʒrohv/ – /dʒɹov/ –

Drown
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “how”, or “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and (with most people’s pronunciation) there is a phantom letter “d” at the end but it is almost stopped (this is not necessarily “correct” but is a product of the evolution of pronunciation as it feels more natural to transition from this to another word with the phantom “d” at the end of the word)

/dʒrown-[d]/ – /dʒɹaun.[d]/ –

Drowning
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “now” or “how” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is (often) a phantom letter “d” in-between the “w” and the “n” (this is not necessarily “correct” but is a product of the evolution of pronunciation as it feels more natural to transition from this to another word with the phantom “d” at the end of the word), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒROWN-[d]ing/ – /ˈdʒɹaun.[d]ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Drug
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, and the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped

/dʒruh[g]//ˈdʒɹʌ[g]/

Drugstore (Drug-Store)
– For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, the “g” is hard but is almost stopped, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/dʒRUH[G]-stohr//ˈdʒɹʌ[g].stoɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Drum
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “u” is short

/dʒruhm//dʒɹʌm/

Drunk
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), and the final “k” is (sometimes) stopped

/dʒruhng-k//ˈdʒɹʌŋ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Dry
 – For this word, the “D” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/dʒrai// ˈdʒɹaiː/ – Notice also that and that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Du

Due
 – For this word, the “ue” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”

/doo//du/

Dull
 – For this word, the “u” is short

– /duhl/ – /dʌl/ –

Dump
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/duhm-[p]//dʌm.[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts like a second syllable

Dumped
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “p” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/duhm[p]-t//dʌm[p].t/ – Notice also and that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Duplicate (noun)
– For this word, the “u” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /DOOP-lih-kay-ding//ˈdu.plə(ɪ).kə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Duplicate (verb)
– For this word, the “u” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /DOOP-lih-kay-ding//ˈdu.plə(ɪ).kə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Duplicating
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /DOOP-lih-kay-ding//ˈdu.plə(ɪ).keiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Durable
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /D’R-uh-bəl//ˈdəɹ.ə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

During
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/D’R-ing//ˈdɚ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Dust
 – For this word, the “u” is short

/duh-st//dʌ.st/ – Notice also that the “st” ending (even when the “t” is stopped) acts as a second syllable

Duties
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/DOO-deez/ – /ˈdu.ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Duty
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/DOO-dee/ – /ˈdu.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Dy

Dye
– For this word, the “ye” combination is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/dai//daiː/

Dying
– For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “y” and the “i” (this is a product of the transition from one vowel sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/DAI-ying//ˈdaiː.jɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Dynamic
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, the “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/dai--mih[k]//daiː.-mə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Dynasty
 – For this word, the first “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/DAI-nih-stee//ˈdaiː.nə(ɪ).stiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter D ) –


Jump To…

Aa . Bb . Cc . Dd . Ee . Ff . Gg . Hh . Ii . Jj . Kk . Ll . Mm . Nn . Oo . Pp . Qq . Rr . Ss . Tt . Uu . Vv . Ww . Xx . Yy . Zz
Numbers

 


 

Explore GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!

3 thoughts on “”

Leave a Reply

Yo!