– American English Pronunciation–

– ( Letter E:  Ex ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Ex

 

Ea . Ec . Ed . Ef . Eg . Ei . El . Em . En . Ep . Eq . Er . Es . Et . Eu . Ev . Ey

 

Exacerbating
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, the first “a” is short, the “c” is soft, the “e” disappears, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehg--s’r-bay-ding//ɛg.ˈzæ.sɚ.be.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Exact
– For this word,the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, the first “a” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped

/ihg-[K]-t//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzæ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Exactly
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, the first “a” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, the “t” is almost stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ihg-[K]-[t]-lee//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzæ[k].[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Exaggerate
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, the “a” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehg--dʒ’r-ay[t]//ɛg.ˈzæ.dʒɚ.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Exaggerated
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, the first “a” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single soft letter “g”,, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihg--dʒ’r-ay-dih[d]//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzæ.dʒɚ.e.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Exaggeration
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, the first “a” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single soft letter “g”(this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” disappears, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihg--dʒ’r-AY-shihn//ə(ɪ)g.ˌzæ.dʒɚ.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Exam
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, and the “a” is short,

/ihg-ZæM//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzæm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Examination
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, the first “a” is short, the “i” is short, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehg-zæm-ih-NAY-shihn//ɛg.ˌzæm.ɪ.ˈneiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Examine
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, the “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/ihg--mihn//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzæ,mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Example
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, and “a” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/ehg-ZæM-pəl//ɛg.ˈzæm.pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Examples
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, and “a” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is silent, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ehg-ZæM-pəl-z//ɛg.ˈzæm.pəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Exams
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, the “a” is short, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ehg-ZæM-z//ɛg.ˈzæm.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable, and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Excavating
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “c” is silent, the first “a” turns into u-schwa, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EH-ks-kuh-vay-ding//ˈɛ.ks.kə(ʌ).ve.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Exceed
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihk-SEE[D]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Excel
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, and the second “e” is short

/ihk-SEHL//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsɛl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Excellent
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EHK-sə-lihn-[t]//ˈɛk.sə.lə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Except
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like letter “k”, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, and the “p” is (usually) stopped

/ehk-SEH[P]-t//ɛk.ˈsɛ[p].t/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Exception
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, the “p” is almost stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SEHP-shihn//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsɛp.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Excess
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft”, and for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SEHS//ə(ɪ)kˈsɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Excessive
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehk-SEH-sihv//ɛk.ˈsɛ.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Excessively
– For this word the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k” combination, the “c” is soft,, and for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ehk-SEH-sihv-lee//ɛk.ˈsɛ.sə(ɪ)v.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Exchange
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/ihks-CHAYNdʒ//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈtʃeiːndʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Exchanging
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the first “g” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-s-CHAYN-dʒing//ə(ɪ)k.s.ˈtʃeiːn.dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Excite
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/ihk-SIGH[T]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsʌiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Excited
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihk-SIGH-dih[d]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsʌiːɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Excitement
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the second “e” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SIGH[T]-mihn-[t]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsʌiː[t].mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Exciting
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, the first “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SIGH-ding//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsʌiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Exclude
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is hard, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/ihks-KLOO[D]//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈklu[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Excluding
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is hard, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihks-KLOO-ding//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈkluɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Exclusive
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “c” is hard, the “u” is long, and for the “-sive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehks-KLOO-sihv//ɛks.ˈklu.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Exclusively
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “c” is hard, the “u” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihks-KLOO-sihv-lee//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈklu.sə(ɪ)v.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Exclusivity
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “c” is hard, the “u” is long, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehks-kloo-SIH-vih-dee//ɛks.klu.ˈsɪ.və(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Excursion
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “c” is hard, the “u” disappears, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SK’R-zhuhn//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈkəɹ.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Excuse
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the final “e” is silent

/ihk-SKYOOS//ə(ɪ)k.ˈskjus/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Execute
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” turns into an i-scwha, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/EHKS-ih-kyoo[t]//ˈɛk.sə(ɪ).kju[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Executed
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” turns into an i-scwha, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/EHKS-ih-kyoo-dih[d]//ˈɛk.sə(ɪ).kju.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Executive
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihg-ZEH-kyoo-dihv//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzɛk.ju.ɾə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Executives
– For this word, the “E” turns into a true-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ihg-ZEHK-you-tihv-z//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzɛ.kju.tə(ɪ)v.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Exercise
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” disappears, the “c” is soft, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/EHK-s’r-saiz//ˈɛks.ɚ.saɪz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Exercises
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” disappears, the “c” is soft, the “i” is long, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the third “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/EHK-s’r-sai-zihz//ˈɛk.sɚ.saiː.zə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Exfoliating
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combination, the “o” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehks-FOH-lee-ay-ding//ɛks.ˈfo.liː.e.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Exhaust
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” sounds like a “gz” combination, the “h” is silent, the “au” combination is pronounced like an “aw” combination, and the final letter “t” is (often) stopped

/ihg-ZAWS-[t]//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzɔs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Exhausted
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” sounds like a “gz” combination, the “h” is silent, the “au” combination is pronounced like an “aw” combination, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is pronounced like an i-schwa and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/ihg-ZAWS-tih[d]//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzɔs.tə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Exhaustion
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” sounds like a “gz” combination, the “h” is silent, the “au” combination is pronounced like an “aw” combination, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “ch” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihg-ZAWS-chən//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzɔs.tʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Exhibit
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” sounds like a “gz” combination, the “h” is silent, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/ihg-ZIH-bih[t]//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzɪ.bə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Exhibition
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehk-sih-BIH-shihn//ɛk.sə(ɪ)ˈbɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Exhilaration
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, the “h” is silent, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “a” disappears, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihg-zeh-l’r-AY-shihn//ə(ɪ)g.ˌzə(ɪ).lɚ.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Exist
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, and the “i” is short, and the “t” ending is (sometimes) stopped

/ehg-ZIHS-[t]//ɛg.ˈzɪs.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable, and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Existence
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, the “i” is short, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehgz-IHS-tihns//ɛg.ˈzɪs.tə(ɪ)ns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Existential
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “e” is short, and for the “tial” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehg-zih-STEHN-shəl//ɛg.zə(ɪ).ˈstɛn.ʃəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Existing
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, the “i” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehg-ZIHS-ting//ɛg.ˈzɪs.tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Exit
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/EHK-si[t]//ˈɛk.sə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that –

 

Exorbitant
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination (this is one of TWO standard pronunciations of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehg-ZOHR-bih-tihn-[t]//ɛg.ˈzoɹ.bə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

 

Expand
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and the “a” is short, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/ihks-PæN[D]//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpæn[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Expansion
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “a” is short, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihks-PæN-shihn//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpæn.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Expect
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped

/ihk-SPEH[K]T//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɛ[k]t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Expectancy
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is also short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ancy” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihks-PEH[K]-tihn-see//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpɛ[k].tə(ɪ)n.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Expectation
– For this word, The “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehk-speh[k]-TAY-shihn//ɛk.spɛ[k].ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Expectations
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ehks-peh[k]-TAY-shihnz//ɛks.pɛ[k].ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)nz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Expected
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is also short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/ihks-PHEK-tih[d]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɛk.tə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Expects
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but it (often) stopped

/ihks-PE[K]-ts//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɛ[k].ts/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable, and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Expenditure
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SPEHN-dih-ch’r//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɛn.də(ɪ).tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Expense
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, and the final “e” is silent

/ihk-SPEHNS//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsɛns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Expenses
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, the third “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ihk-SPEHN-sihz//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɛn.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Expensive
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihks-PEHN-sihv//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpɛn.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Experience
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “e” of the “-ence” suffix (this is a product of the transition from one vowel sound to the next), and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihks-PEER-ee-yihns//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpiːɹ.iː.jɪns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Experienced
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “e” of the “-ence” suffix (this is a product of the transition from one vowel sound to the next), for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending (combined with the “e” engins of the root-word – the “e” is never doubled) is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/ehks-PEER-ee-yihns-[t]//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpiːɹ.iː.jə(ɪ)ns.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

 

Experiential
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “e” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the third “e” is short, and for the “tial” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihks-peer-ee-YEHN-shəl//ə(ɪ)ks.ˌpiːɹ.iː.ˈjɛn.ʃəl/ – Notice also that there is a minor on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the second syllable

 

Experiment
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehks-PEER-ih-mihn-[t]//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpiːɹə(ɪ).mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

 

Experimentation
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and or the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehks-peer-ih-mihn-TAY-shihn//ə(ɪ)ks.piːɹə(ɪ).mə(ɪ)n.ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable, that the major stress is on the fifth syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

 

Expert
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “e” disappears, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/EHK-sp’r-[t]//ˈɛks.pɚ[t]/ – Notice also that –

 

Expertise
– For this word, For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combination, the second “e” disappears, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “e” is silent

/ehks-p’r-TEES//ɛks.pɚ.ˈtiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Experts
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combination, and the second “e” disappears

/EHKS-p’r-ts//ˈɛks.pɚ.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Expiration
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “i” disappears, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehks-p’r-AY-shihn//ɛks.pɚ.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Expire
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from the vowel sound to the “r” sound), and the final “e” is silent

/ihks-PIGH-yr//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Explain
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ihks-PLAYN//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspleiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Explicitly
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the first “i” is short, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is short, the “t” is (usually) and for the “-ly” suffix – the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/ihks-PLIH-sih[t]-lee//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈplɪ.sɪ[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Explained
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a (often) stopped

/ihks-PLAYN-[d]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspleiːn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Explode
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/ihk-SPLOH[D]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsplo[ɾ]/ – Notice also that – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Exploded
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” is long, the first “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

/ihks-PLOH-dih[d]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsplo.ɾə(ʌ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Exploit
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ehks-PLOY[T]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsploiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Exploitation
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, the “a” is a Long A / Long E Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-
voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehk-sploy-TAY-shihn//ɛk.sploi.ˈte.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Exploitative
– For this word there are two common pronunciations:

For the first pronunciation: The “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combination, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihks-PLOY-duh-tihv//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsploiː.ɾə(ʌ).tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress on the second syllable

For the second pronunciation: The “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ive” suffix – “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehks-ploy-TAY-dihv//ɛks.ploiː.ˈte.ɾə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Explore
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/ihks-PLOHR//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsploɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Explosion
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” is long, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SPLOH-zhihn//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsplo.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Exponentially
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the second “e” is short, for the “tial” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ehks-puh-NEHN-shuh-lee//ˌɛks.bə(ʌ).ˈnɛn.ʃəl.iː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Export
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/EHKS-pohr-[t]//ˈɛks.poɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Expose
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the “e” is silent

/ehks-POHZ//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspoz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Exposed
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/ehks-POHZ-[d]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspoz.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Exposing
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehk-SPOH-zing//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspo.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Exposure
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “p” is pronounced almost like the letter “b”, the “o” is long, and for the “-sure” suffix – the “s” is pronounced like voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehks-POH-zh’r//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspo.ʒəɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Express
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SPREHS//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɹɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Expressing
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SPREH-sing//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɹɛ.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Expression
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination merges with the “-sion” combination and does not affect the pronunciation in any way, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SPREH-shihn//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɹɛ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Expressive
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihks-PREH-sihv//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɹɛ.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Extend
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, and the final “d” if (often) stopped

/ihks-TEHN-[d]//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈtɛn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the final “d” (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Extension
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-STEHN-shihn//ə(ɪ)k.ˈstɛn.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Extensive
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihks-TEHN-sihv//ə(ɪ)k.ˈtɛn.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Extent
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihks-TEHN-[t]//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈtɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

External
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and for the “-ern” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihks-T’R-nəl//ə(ɪ)k.ˈtɚ.nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Extra
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “a” turns into a u-schwa

/EHKS-chruh//ɛks.ˈtʃɹə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Extraordinary (extra-Ordinary)
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” disappears, the “o” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihks-CHROHR-dih-nayr-ee//ə(ɪ)k.ˈstʃɹoɹ.də(ɪ).neɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Extreme
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “e” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/ihks-CHREEM//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈtʃɹiːm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Extremely
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “e” is long, the third “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ihks-CHREEM-lee//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈtʃɹiːm.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Extrinsic
 – For this word, the “E” is a true-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “i” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/əks-CHRIHN-zih[k]//əks.ˈtʃɹɪn.zə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Extrovert
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” disappears, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/EKS-chruh-v’r-[t]//ˈɛks.tʃɹə(ʌ).vɚ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Extroverted
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

/EKS-chruh-v’r-dih-[d]//ˈɛks.tʃɹə(ʌ).vɚ.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter E ) –


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