– American English Pronunciation–

– ( Letter E:  Em, En, Eo ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily. The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

Ee

 

Ea – Ec . Ed – Ef . Eg – Ei . Ej – El . En . Eo . Ep – Er . Es – Eu . Ev – Ez

 

E-Mail
 – For this word, the “E” is long, and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it)

– /EE-mayl//ˈiː-meɪl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Embarrass
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second letter “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-BAYR-ihs//ə(ɪ)m.ˈbeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Embarrassed
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/ihm-BAYR-ih-st/ – /ə(ɪ)mˈbeɪɹ.ə(ɪ).st/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Embarrassing
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwathe first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-BAYR-ih-sing//ə(ɪ)mˈbeɪɹ.ə(ɪ).sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Embarrassment
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwathe first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-BAYR-ihs-mihn[t]//ə(ɪ)mˈbeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)s.mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Embassy
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/EHM-bə-see/ – /ˈɛm.bə.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Embedded
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “dd” combination is pronounced like the single flap-d (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

/ihm-BEH-dih[d]//ə(ɪ)m.ˈbɛ.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Ember
 – For this word, the “E” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /EHM-b’r//ˈɛm.bɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the the first syllable

 

Embezzlement
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “zz” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “z”(this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “z” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the third “e” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/əm-BEH-zəl-mihn[t]//əm.ˈbɛ.zəl.mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Embrace
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/ihm-BRAYS/ – /ə(ɪ)m.ˈbɹeiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Emerald
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” disappears, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/EHM-rəl[d]/ – /ˈɛm.ɹəl[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Emerge
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the second “e” disappears, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/ee-M’Rdʒ//iː.ˈmɚdʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Emerged
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the second “e” disappears, the “g” is soft, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the soft letter “g” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “d”

/ee-M’R-tʒ-d//iː.ˈmɚ.tʒ.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Emergency
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the second “e” disappears, the “g” is soft, the third “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/ee-M’R-dʒihn-see//iː.ˈmɚ.dʒə(ɪ)n.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Emerging
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the second “e” disappears, the first “g” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-M’R-dʒing//iː.ˈmɚ.dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Emigrate
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard,, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EH-mih-gray[t]/ – /ˈɛ.mə(ɪ).gɹe[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Emirates
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “i” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EH-mə-rih-ts//ˈɛ.mə.ɹə(ɪ).ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

 

Emit
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /ee-MIH[T]//iː.ˈmɪ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Emotion
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the first “o” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-MOH-shin//iː.ˈmo.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Emotional
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the first “o” is long, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-MOH-shihn-əl/ – /iː.ˈmo.ʃə(ɪ)n.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Empathetic
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the second “e” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehm-puh-THEH-dih[k]//ˌɛm.pə(ʌ).ˈθɛ.ɾə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Empathy
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “th” combination is un-voiced, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/EHM-puh-thee//ˈɛm.pə.θiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Emphasis
.– For this word, the “E” is short, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-sis” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EHM-fuh-sihs//ˈɛm.fə(ʌ).sə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Emphasize
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EHM-fuh-saiz//ˈɛm.fə(ʌ).saiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Empire
 – For this word, the “E” is short, and for the “-ire” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EHM-pigh-yr//ˈɛm.pʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Employ
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, and the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “boy” or “toy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /ihm-PLOY//ə(ɪ)m.ˈploiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Employee
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is pronounced like the “oy” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “y” and the “ee” combination (this is a product of the transition from one vowel sound to another), and the “ee” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /ihm-PLOY-yee//ə(ɪ)m.ˈploiː.jiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable – 

 

Employees
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “toy” or “boy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “y” and the “ee” combination (this is a product of the transition from one vowel sound to another), the “ee” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /ihm-PLOY-yeez//ə(ɪ)m.ˈploiː.jiːz/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Employer
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “toy” or “boy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “y” and the “e” (this is a product of the transition from one vowel sound to another), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-PLOY-yr//ə(ɪ)m.ˈploiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Employers
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “toy” or “boy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “y” and the “e” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to another), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ihm-PLOY-yr-z//ə(ɪ)m.ˈploiː.jɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

 

Employment
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “toy” or “boy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-PLOY-min[t]//ə(ɪ)m.ˈploiː.mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Empty
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/EHM[P]-tee//ˈɛm[p].tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

En

 

Enable
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/ihn-AY-bəl//ə(ɪ)n.ˈe.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Encircle
.– For this word, the “E” is short, the first “c” is soft, the “i” disappears, the second “c” is hard, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “c” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the last “e” is silent

/ehn-S’R-kəl/ – /ɛn.ˈsɚ.kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Encounter
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-COWN-t’r/ – /ə(ɪ)n.ˈkaun.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Encourage
.– For this word, the “E” is short, the “c” is hard, the “ou” combination disappears, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ehn-K’R-ihdʒ//ɛn.ˈkəɹ.ə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Encouraged
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ou” combination disappears, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the soft “g” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final (according to pronunciation “rules”) should be pronounced like the letter “d” – but due to the soft “g” sound directly before it – is pronounced almost like the letter “t” and it almost stopped

/ehn-K’R-ihtʃ-[t]//ɛn.ˈkɚ.ə(ɪ)tʃ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable, and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

 

Encourages
.– For this word, the “E” is short, the “c” is hard, the “ou” combination disappears, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and since the word is plural – the “e” merges with the “-es” ending and turns into an i-schwa,  and  final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ehn-K’R-ihdʒ-ihz/ – /ɛn.ˈkəɹ.ə(ɪ)dʒ.ə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Encouragement
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ou” combination disappears, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-K’R-ihdʒ-mihn-[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈkɚ.ə(ɪ)dʒ.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

 

Encouraging
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ou” combination disappears, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-K’R-ih-dʒing//ə(ɪ)n.ˈkɚ.ə(ɪ).dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Encrypted
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “p” is (usually) stopped, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihn-KRIH[P]-dih[d]/ – /ə(ɪ)n.ˈkɹɪ[p].də(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

End
 – For this word, the “E” is short, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/ehn-[d]//ɛn.[d]/

 

Endangered
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

/ihn-DAYN-dʒ’r-[d]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈdeiːn.dʒɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Endeavor
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-DEH-v’r//ə(ɪ)n.ˈdɛ.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Ending
 – For this word, the “E” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EHN-ding//ˈɛn.dɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Endorsement
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the first “e” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-DOHRS-mihn[t]/ – /ə(ɪ)n.ˈdoɹs.mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Endure
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “u” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/ihn-DOOR//ə(ɪ)n.ˈduɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Enduring
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “u” disappears, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-D’R-ing//ə(ɪ)n.ˈdɚɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Enemies
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/EH-nih-meez//ˈɛ.nə(ɪ).miːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Enemy
 – For this word, the first “E” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/EH-nə-mee//ˈɛ.nə.miː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Energetic
 – For this word, the first “E” is short, the second “e” disappears, the “g” is soft, the third “e” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/eh-n’r-dʒEH-di[k]//ˌɛ.nɚ.ˈdʒɛ.ɾə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Energy
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” disappears, the “g” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/EH-n’r-dʒee//ˈɛ.nɚ.dʒiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Enforce
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/ihn-FOHR-s//ə(ɪ)n.ˈfoɹ.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Engage
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the first “g” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the second “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /ehn-GAYdʒ/ – /ɛn.geiːdʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Engaged
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the first “g” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the second “g” is soft, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the soft “g” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/ehn-GAYdʒ-d/ – /ɛn.ˈgeiːdʒ.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Engaging
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the first “g” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the second “g” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-GAY-dʒing//ə(ɪ)n.ˈgeiː.dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Engender
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, the second “e” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihn-dʒEHN-d’r//ə(ɪ)n.ˈdʒɛn.dɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Engine
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “g” is soft, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/EHN-dʒə(ɪ)n//ˈɛn.dʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Engineer
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “g” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ehn-dʒihn-EER//ˌɛn.dʒə(ɪ)n.ˈiːɹ/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Engineering
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “g” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ehn-gih-NEER-ing//ˌɛn.dʒə(ɪ)n.ˈiːɹ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

England
.– For this word, the “En” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination, the “g” is hard (pronounced separately from the letter “n”), and for the “-land” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHNG-glihn-[d]//ˈɪŋ.glə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable –

 

English
 – For this word, the “En” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination, the “g” is hard (separate from the “ng” combination), and the “i” is an i-schwa

– /ING-glihsh//ˈɪŋ.glə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Enhance
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” is short, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-HæNS//ə(ɪ)n.ˈhæns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Enhanced
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” is short, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /ihn-HæNS[T]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈhæns[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

 

Enjoy
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), and the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “toy” or “boy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-dʒOY//ə(ɪ)n.ˈdʒoiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Enjoyed
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “boy” or “toy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the “oy” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ehn-dʒOY[D]//ɛn.ˈdʒoiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Enjoyment
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “boy” or “toy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-dʒOY-mihn[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈdʒoiː.mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Enlarge
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/ihn-LAHRdʒ//ə(ɪ)n.ˈlɑɹdʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Enlarging
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-LAHR-dʒing//ə(ɪ)n.ˈlɑɹ.dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Enormous
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “o” is long, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-NOHR-mihs//iː.ˈnoɹ.mə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Enough
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the short letter “u”, and the “gh” combination is pronounced like the letter “f”

/ee-NUHF//iː.ˈnʌf/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Ensure
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-sure” suffix – the “s” is pronounced like voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-SHOOR//ə(ɪ)n.ˈʃuɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Entail
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it)

/ihn-TAYL//ə(ɪ)n.ˈteɪl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Enter
 – For this word, the “E” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EHN-t’r//ˈɛn.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Entered
 – For this word, the “E” is short, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/EHN-t’r-[d]//ˈɛn.tɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Enterprise
 – For this word, the “E” is short, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

– /EHN-t’r-praiz//ˈɛn.tɚ.pɹaiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Enterprises
 – For this word, the “E” is short, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the third “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” also is pronounced like the letter “z”

– /EHN-t’r-prai-zihz//ˈɛn.tɚ.pɹaiː.zə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Entertain
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” disappears, and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

/ehn-t’r-TAYN//ɛn.tɚ.ˈteiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Entertainer
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” disappearsthe “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehn-t’r-TAY-n’r//ɛn.tɚ.ˈteiː.nɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Entertaining
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” disappears,the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehn-t’r-TAY-ning//ɛn.tɚ.ˈteiː.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Entertainment
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” disappears,the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ehn-t’r-TAYN-mihn[t]//ɛn.tɚ.ˈteiːn.mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Enthralled
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihn-THRAWL-[d]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈθɹɔl.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Enthusiasm
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “u” is long, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-asm” suffix – the “a” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is a product of the transition from one sound the next)(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-THOO-zee-æ-zəm//ə(ɪ)n.ˈθu.ziː.æ.zəm/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable, and that the “sm” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Enthusiastic
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “u” is long, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-thoo-zee-æS-tih[k]//ə(ɪ)n.ˌθu.ziː.ˈæs.tə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Entire
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ire” combination – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this lettr combination in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-TIGH-yr//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Entirely
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of transitioning from one vowel sound to another), the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-TIGH-yr-lee//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtʌiː.jɚ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Entitle
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the second “t” is a flap-t, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “t” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/ihn-TIGH-dəl//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtʌiː.ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Entrance
.– For this word, the “E” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EHN-chrihns/ – /ˈɛn.tʃɹə(ɪ)ns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Entree
 – For this word, the “E” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “ee” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

/AHN-chray//ˈɑn.tʃɹeiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Entrepreneur
 – For this word, the “E” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “e” turns into a u-schwa, the third “e” also turns into an i-schwa, the “eu” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and there is a phantom letter “w” between the “u” and the final “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)

– /ahn-truh-prih-NOO-wɚ/ – /ɑn.tɹə(ʌ).pɹə(ɪ).ˈnu.wɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Entrepreneurial
 – For this word, the “E” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it),the second “e” turns into a u-schwa, the third “e” also turns into an i-schwa, the “eu” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and for the “-ial” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ahn-truh-prih-NOO-ree-əl//ɑn.tɹə(ʌ).pɹə(ɪ).ˈnu.ɹiː.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Entrepreneurs
 – For this word, the “E” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “e” turns into a u-schwa, the third “e” also turns into an i-schwa, the “eu” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and there is a phantom letter “w” between the “u” and the final “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /ahn-truh-prih-NOO-wɚz/ – /ɑn.tɹə(ʌ).pɹə(ɪ).ˈnu.wɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Entrepreneurship
 – For this word, the “E” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “e” turns into a u-schwa, the third “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “eu” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, there is a phantom letter “w” between the “u” and the final “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-ship” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /ahn-truh-prih-NOO-wɚ-shih[p]/ – /ɑn.tɹə(ʌ).pɹə(ɪ).ˈnu.wɚ.ʃə(ɪ)[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Entropy
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/EHN-chrə-pee//ˈɛn.tʃɹə.piː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Entry
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/EHN-chree//ˈɛn.tʃɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Envelope (noun)
– For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the “p” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/EHN-vih-loh[p]//ˈɛn.və(ɪ).lo[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Envelopes (noun)
– For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is long, and the “e” is silent

/EHN-vih-loh-ps//ˈɛn.və(ɪ).lo.ps/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ps” ending acts as a separate syllable –

 

Envelope (verb)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “p” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/ihn-VEH-luh[p]//ˈə(ɪ)n.vɛ.lə(ʌ)[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Envelopes (verb)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and the “e” is silent

/ihn-VEH-luh-ps//ˈə(ɪ)n.vɛ.lə(ʌ).ps/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ps” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Enveloped
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “p” is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “p”, the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/ihn-VEH-luh[p]-t/ – /ə(ɪ)n.ˈvɛ.lə(ʌ)[p].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

 

Envious
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /EHN-vee-ihs//ˈɛn.viː.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice that the stress is on the stress is on the first syllable

 

Environment
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is the product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “o” disappears, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihn-VIGH-yrn-mihn[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈvʌiː.jɚn.mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Environmental
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is the product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “o” disappears, for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihn-vigh-yrn-MEHN-təl//ə(ɪ)n.vʌiː.jɚn.mɛnt.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fourth syllable –

 

Environmentalist
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is the product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “o” disappears, for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ist” suffix – and the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

 – /ihn-vigh-yrn-MEHN-təl-ih-st/ – /ə(ɪ)n.vʌiː.jɚn.mɛnt.əl.ə(ɪ).st/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

 

Envy
 – For this word, the “E” is short, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /EHN-vee//ˈɛn.viː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Eo

 

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter E ) –


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