– American English Pronunciation–

– ( Letter E:  Ev, Ew, Ex, Ey, Ez ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.


Ee

 

Ea – Ec . Ed – Ef . Eg – Ei . Ej – El . Em – Eo . Ep – Er . Es – Eu . Ew . Exa . Exb . Exc . Exd . Exe . Exf . Exg . Exh . Exi . Exj . Exk . Exl . Exm . Exn . Exo . Exp . Exq . Exr . Exs . Ext . Exu . Exv . Exw . Exx . Exy . ExzEy . Ez

 

Evacuate
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “a” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/ee--kyou-ay[t]//iː.ˈvæ.kju.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Evacuation
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “a” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-væ-kyou-AY-shihn//iː.væ.kju.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Evaluate
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “a” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second,, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-VæL-you-ay[t]/ – /iː.ˈvæl.ju.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Evaluation
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the first “a” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, there is a phantom “w” in-between the “u” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next) the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-væl-you-WAY-shihn/ – /ee.ˌvæl.ju.ˈweiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Evasion
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-VAY-zhihn//iː.ˈveiː.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Eve
 – For this word, the “E” is long, and the second “e” is silent

/eev//iːv/

 

Even
 – For this word, the “E” is long, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EE-vihn//ˈiː.və(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Evening
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the second “e” disappears, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /EEV-ning//ˈiːv.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Event
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the second “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /ee-VEHN[T]//iː.ˈvɛn[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Events
 – For this word, the “E” is long, and the second “e” is short

– /ee-VEHN-ts//iː.ˈvɛn.ts/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Eventually
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the second “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ee-VEHN-chə-lee//iː.ˈvɛn.tʃə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Ever
 – For this word, the “E” is short, and the second “e” disappears

– /EH-v’r//ˈɛ.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Every
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/EH-vree//ˈɛ.vɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Everybody
.– For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” disappears, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /EHV-ree-buh-dee//ˈɛv.ɹiː.bʌ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Everyday
.– For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-day” suffix – the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/eh-vree-day//ɛ.vɹiː.deiː/ – Notice also that there is no discernible stress –

 

Everyone
.– For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” disappears, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “y” and the “o”, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/EH-vree-wuhn//ˈɛ.vɹiː.wə(ʌ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Everything
.– For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” disappears, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “th” combination is un-voiced, and the and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EH-vree-thing//ˈɛ.vɹiː.θɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Everywhere
.– For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” disappears, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “w”, the third “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/EH-vree-wayr//ˈɛ.vɹiː.weɪɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Evidence
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EH-vih-dihns//ˈɛ.və(ɪ).də(ɪ)ns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Evil
 – For this word, the “e” is long, and the “i” turns into a true-schwa

– /EE-vəl//ˈiː.vəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Evolutionary
.– For this word, the “E” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “u” is long, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/eh-voh-LOO-shih-nayr-ee//ɛ.və(ʌ).ˈlu.ʃə(ɪ).neɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Evolve
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is short, and the final “e” is silent

/ih-VAHL-v//ə(ɪ).ˈvɑl.v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “v” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Ew

 

Exa

Exacerbating
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, the first “a” is short, the “c” is soft, the “e” disappearsthe second “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehg--s’r-bay-ding//ɛg.ˈzæ.sɚ.be.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Exact
 – For this word,the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, the first “a” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped

/ihg-[K]-t//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzæ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Exactly
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, the first “a” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, the “t” is almost stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ihg-[K]-[t]-lee//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzæ[k].[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Exaggerate
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, the “a” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ehg--dʒ’r-ay[t]/ – /ɛg.ˈzæ.dʒɚ.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Exaggerated
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, the first “a” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single soft letter “g”,, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped 

/ihg--dʒ’r-ay-dih[d]//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzæ.dʒɚ.e.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Exaggeration
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, the first “a” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single soft letter “g”(this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” disappears, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihg--dʒ’r-AY-shihn/ – /ə(ɪ)g.ˌzæ.dʒɚ.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

 

Exam
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, and the “a” is short,

/ihg-ZæM//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzæm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Examination
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, the first “a” is short, the “i” is short, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ehg-zæm-ih-NAY-shihn//ɛg.ˌzæm.ɪ.ˈneiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Examine
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, the “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/ihg--mihn//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzæ,mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Example
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, and “a” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

– /ehg-ZæM-pəl//ɛg.ˈzæm.pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Examples
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, and “a” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is silent, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /ehg-ZæM-pəl-z//ɛg.ˈzæm.pəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

 

Exams
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, the “a” is short, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ehg-ZæM-z//ɛg.ˈzæm.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable, and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Exb

 

Exc

 

Excavating
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “c” is silent, the first “a” turns into u-schwa, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EH-ks-kuh-vay-ding//ˈɛ.ks.kə(ʌ).ve.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Exceed
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihk-SEE[D]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Excel
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, and the second “e” is short

/ihk-SEHL//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsɛl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Excellent
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EHK-sə-lihn-[t]//ˈɛk.sə.lə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Except
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like letter “k”, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, and the “p” is (usually) stopped

– /ehk-SEH[P]-t//ɛk.ˈsɛ[p].t/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Exception
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, the “p” is almost stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SEHP-shihn//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsɛp.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Excess
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft”, and for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SEHS//ə(ɪ)kˈsɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Excessive
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehk-SEH-sihv//ɛk.ˈsɛ.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Excessively
 – For this word the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k” combination, the “c” is soft,, and for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /ehk-SEH-sihv-lee//ɛk.ˈsɛ.sə(ɪ)v.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Exchange
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /ihks-CHAYNdʒ//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈtʃeiːndʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Exchanging
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the first “g” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-s-CHAYN-dʒing//ə(ɪ)k.s.ˈtʃeiːn.dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Excite
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/ihk-SIGH[T]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsʌiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Excited
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihk-SIGH-dih[d]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsʌiːɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Excitement
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the second “e” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SIGH[T]-mihn-[t]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsʌiː[t].mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

 

Exciting
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, the first “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SIGH-ding//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsʌiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Exclude
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is hard, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/ihks-KLOO[D]//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈklu[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Excluding
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is hard, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihks-KLOO-ding//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈkluɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Exclusive
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “c” is hard, the “u” is long, and for the “-sive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehks-KLOO-sihv//ɛks.ˈklu.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

 

Exclusivity
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “c” is hard, the “u” is long, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehks-kloo-SIH-vih-dee//ɛks.klu.ˈsɪ.və(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

 

Excursion
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “c” is hard, the “u” disappears, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihk-SK’R-zhuhn/ – /ə(ɪ)ks.ˈkəɹ.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Excuse
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the final “e” is silent

/ihk-SKYOOS//ə(ɪ)k.ˈskjus/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Exd

 

Exe

 

Execute
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” turns into an i-scwha, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /EHKS-ih-kyoo[t]//ˈɛk.sə(ɪ).kju[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Executed
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” turns into an i-scwha, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /EHKS-ih-kyoo-dih[d]//ˈɛk.sə(ɪ).kju.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Executive
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihg-ZEH-kyoo-dihv/ – /ə(ɪ)g.ˈzɛk.ju.ɾə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Executives
 – For this word, the “E” turns into a true-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /ihg-ZEHK-you-tihv-z/ – /ə(ɪ)g.ˈzɛ.kju.tə(ɪ)v.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Exercise
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” disappears, the “c” is soft, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

– /EHK-s’r-saiz//ˈɛks.ɚ.saɪz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Exercises
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” disappears, the “c” is soft, the “i” is long, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the third “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/EHK-s’r-sai-zihz/ – /ˈɛk.sɚ.saiː.zə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Exf

 

Exfoliating
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combination, the “o” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ehks-FOH-lee-ay-ding//ɛks.ˈfo.liː.e.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Exg

 

Exh

 

Exhaust
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” sounds like a “gz” combination, the “h” is silent, the “au” combination is pronounced like an “aw” combination, and the final letter “t” is (often) stopped

– /ihg-ZAWS-[t]//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzɔs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Exhausted
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” sounds like a “gz” combination, the “h” is silent, the “au” combination is pronounced like an “aw” combination, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is pronounced like an i-schwa and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /ihg-ZAWS-tih[d]//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzɔs.tə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Exhaustion
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” sounds like a “gz” combination, the “h” is silent, the “au” combination is pronounced like an “aw” combination, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “ch” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihg-ZAWS-chən/ – /ə(ɪ)g.ˈzɔs.tʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Exhibit
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” sounds like a “gz” combination, the “h” is silent, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/ihg-ZIH-bih[t]//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzɪ.bə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Exhibition
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehk-sih-BIH-shihn//ɛk.sə(ɪ)ˈbɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Exhilaration
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, the “h” is silent, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “a” disappears, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihg-zeh-l’r-AY-shihn//ə(ɪ)g.ˌzə(ɪ).lɚ.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Exi

 

Exist
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, and the “i” is short, and the “t” ending is (sometimes) stopped

– /ehg-ZIHS-[t]//ɛg.ˈzɪs.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable, and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Existence
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, the “i” is short, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ehgz-IHS-tihns//ɛg.ˈzɪs.tə(ɪ)ns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Existential
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “e” is short, and for the “tial” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehg-zih-STEHN-shəl//ɛg.zə(ɪ).ˈstɛn.ʃəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Existing
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, the “i” is short,  and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehg-ZIHS-ting/ – /ɛg.ˈzɪs.tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Exit
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/EHK-si[t]//ˈɛk.sə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that –

 

Exj

 

Exk

 

Exl

 

Exm

Exn

Exo

 

Exorbitant
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination (this is one of TWO  standard pronunciations of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehg-ZOHR-bih-tihn-[t]//ɛg.ˈzoɹ.bə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable –

 

Exp

 

Expand
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and the “a” is short, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

– /ihks-PæN[D]//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpæn[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Expansion
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “a” is short, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihks-PæN-shihn//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpæn.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Expect
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped

/ihk-SPEH[K]T//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɛ[k]t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Expectancy
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is also short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ancy” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihks-PEH[K]-tihn-see//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpɛ[k].tə(ɪ)n.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Expectation
 – For this word, The “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehk-speh[k]-TAY-shihn//ɛk.spɛ[k].ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

 

Expectations
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /ehks-peh[k]-TAY-shihnz//ɛks.pɛ[k].ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)nz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

 

Expected
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is also short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /ihks-PHEK-tih[d]/ – /ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɛk.tə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Expects
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but it (often) stopped

– /ihks-PE[K]-ts//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɛ[k].ts/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable, and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Expenditure
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SPEHN-dih-ch’r//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɛn.də(ɪ).tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Expense
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, and the final “e” is silent

/ihk-SPEHNS//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsɛns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Expenses
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, the third “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ihk-SPEHN-sihz/ – /ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɛn.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Expensive
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination,  the second “e” is short, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihks-PEHN-sihv//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpɛn.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Experience
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “e” of the “-ence” suffix (this is a product of the transition from one vowel sound to the next), and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihks-PEER-ee-yihns/ – /ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpiːɹ.iː.jɪns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Experienced
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “e” of the “-ence” suffix (this is a product of the transition from one vowel sound to the next), for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending (combined with the “e” engins of the root-word – the “e” is never doubled) is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /ehks-PEER-ee-yihns-[t]//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpiːɹ.iː.jə(ɪ)ns.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable –

 

Experiential
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “e” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the third “e” is short, and for the “tial” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihks-peer-ee-YEHN-shəl/ – /ə(ɪ)ks.ˌpiːɹ.iː.ˈjɛn.ʃəl/ – Notice also that there is a minor on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the second syllable –

 

Experiment
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehks-PEER-ih-mihn-[t]//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpiːɹə(ɪ).mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable –

 

Experimentation
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and or the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehks-peer-ih-mihn-TAY-shihn//ə(ɪ)ks.piːɹə(ɪ).mə(ɪ)n.ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable, that the major stress is on the fifth syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable –

 

Expert
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “e” disappears, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/EHK-sp’r-[t]//ˈɛks.pɚ[t]/ – Notice also that –

 

Expertise
 – For this word, For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combination, the second “e” disappears, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “e” is silent

– /ehks-p’r-TEES//ɛks.pɚ.ˈtiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

 

Experts
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combination, and the second “e” disappears

– /EHKS-p’r-ts//ˈɛks.pɚ.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Expiration
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “i” disappearsthe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehks-p’r-AY-shihn//ɛks.pɚ.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

 

Expire
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from the vowel sound to the “r” sound), and the final “e” is silent

/ihks-PIGH-yr//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Explain
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /ihks-PLAYN//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspleiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Explicitly
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the first “i” is short, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is short, the “t” is (usually) and for the “-ly” suffix – the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/ihks-PLIH-sih[t]-lee//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈplɪ.sɪ[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Explained
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a (often) stopped

– /ihks-PLAYN-[d]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspleiːn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

 

Explode
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/ihk-SPLOH[D]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsplo[ɾ]/ – Notice also that – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Exploded
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” is long, the first “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

– /ihks-PLOH-dih[d]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsplo.ɾə(ʌ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Exploit
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ehks-PLOY[T]/ – /ə(ɪ)k.ˈsploiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Exploitative
 – For this word there are two common pronunciations:

For the first pronunciation:  The “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combination, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihks-PLOY-duh-tihv/ – /ə(ɪ)k.ˈsploiː.ɾə(ʌ).tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress on the second syllable –

For the second pronunciation:  The “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ive” suffix – “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehks-ploy-TAY-dihv/ – /ɛks.ploiː.ˈte.ɾə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

 

Explore
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/ihks-PLOHR//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsploɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Explosion
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” is long, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SPLOH-zhihn//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsplo.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Exponentially
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the second “e” is short, for the “tial” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /ehks-puh-NEHN-shuh-lee//ˌɛks.bə(ʌ).ˈnɛn.ʃəl.iː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Export
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /EHKS-pohr-[t]//ˈɛks.poɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Expose
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the “e” is silent

– /ehks-POHZ/ – /ə(ɪ)k.ˈspoz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Exposed
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /ehks-POHZ-[d]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspoz.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

 

Exposing
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehk-SPOH-zing//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspo.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Exposure
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “p” is pronounced almost like the letter “b”, the “o” is long, and for the “-sure” suffix – the “s” is pronounced like voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ehks-POH-zh’r//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspo.ʒəɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Express
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SPREHS//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɹɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Expressing
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SPREH-sing//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɹɛ.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Expression
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination merges with the “-sion” combination and does not affect the pronunciation in any way, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SPREH-shihn//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɹɛ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Expressive
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihks-PREH-sihv//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɹɛ.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Exq

 

Exr

 

Exs

 

Ext

 

Extend
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, and the final “d” if (often) stopped

/ihks-TEHN-[d]//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈtɛn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the final “d” (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

 

Extension
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-STEHN-shihn//ə(ɪ)k.ˈstɛn.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Extensive
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihks-TEHN-sihv//ə(ɪ)k.ˈtɛn.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Extent
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihks-TEHN-[t]//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈtɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

 

External
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and for the “-ern” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihks-T’R-nəl//ə(ɪ)k.ˈtɚ.nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Extra
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “a” turns into a u-schwa

– /EHKS-chruh//ɛks.ˈtʃɹə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

Extraordinary (extra-Ordinary)
.– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” disappears, the “o” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihks-CHROHR-dih-nayr-ee//ə(ɪ)k.ˈstʃɹoɹ.də(ɪ).neɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Extreme
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “e” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/ihks-CHREEM//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈtʃɹiːm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Extremely
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “e” is long, the third “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ihks-CHREEM-lee//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈtʃɹiːm.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Extrovert
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” disappears, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

– /EKS-chruh-v’r-[t]//ˈɛks.tʃɹə(ʌ).vɚ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

 

Extroverted
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

– /EKS-chruh-v’r-dih-[d]//ˈɛks.tʃɹə(ʌ).vɚ.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable –

 

Exu

 

Exv

 

Exw

 

Exx

 

Exy

 

Exz

Ey

 

Eye
 – For this word, the entire word is pronounced exactly the same as the letter “I” (the long “i” pronunciation)

/ai//aiː/

 

Eyes
 – For this word, the “eye” combination is pronounced exactly the same as the letter “I” (the long “i” pronunciation), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/aiz//aiːz/

 

Ez

 

 

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter E ) –


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