– American English Pronunciation–

– ( Letter E ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.


Ee

 

Eb . Ec . Ed . Ef . Eg . Eh . Ei . Ej . Ek . El . Em . En . Eo . Ep . Eq . Er . Es . Et . Eu . Ev . Ew . Exa . Exc . Exe . Exf . Exh . Exi . Exo . Exp . Ext . Ey . Ez

 

E
 – The name of the letter “E” is pronounced simply as the long letter “e”

– /ee/ – /iː/

Each
 – For this word, the “Ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/ee-ch/ – /iː.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable –

Ear
 – For this word, the “Ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/EE-‘r/ – /ˈiː.ɚ/ – Notice also that the “r” ending acts as a second syllable (this is due to the natural progression from the vowel to the “r” sound)

Early
 – For this word, the “Ea” combination disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /’R-lee//ˈɚ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Earn
 – For this word, the “Ea” combination disappears

/’rn/ – /ɚn/ –

Earned
 – For this word, the “Ea” combination disappears, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

– /’rn-[d]/ – /ɚn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Earning
 – For this word, the “Ea” combination disappears, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation for this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /’R-ning//ˈɚrn.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Earnings
 – For this word, the “Ea” combination disappears, the “-ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /’R-nihŋz//ˈɚ.nɪŋz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Earth
 – For this word, the “Ea” combination disappears, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

– /’rth//ɚθ/

Earthquake
 – For this word, the “Ea” combination disappears, the “th” is un-voiced, the “qu” combination sounds like the “kw” combination, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “k” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /’RTH-kway[k]//ˈɚθ.kweiː[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Ease
 – For this word, the “Ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

– /eez//iːz/

Easier
 – For this word, the “Ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /EE-zee-’r/ – /ˈiː.ziː.ɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Easily
 – For this word, the “Ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and for the “-ily” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EE-zih-lee/ – /ˈiː.zə(ɪ).liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

East
 – For This Word, the “Ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /ees[t]//iːs[t]/

Eastern
 – For this word, the “Ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and for the “-ern” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EES-d’rn/ – /ˈiːs.dɚn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Easy
 – For this word, the “Ea” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /EE-zee//ˈiː.ziː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Eat
 – For this word, the “Ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ee[t]/ – /iː[t]/ –

Eb

 

Ec

Eccentric
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the first “c” is hard, the second “c” is soft, the second “e” is is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SEHN-chrihk//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsɛn.tʃɹə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Ecological
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “c” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is short, the “g” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-kə-LAH-dʒih-kəl//iː.kə.ˈlɑ.dʒə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Economic
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “c” is hard, the first “o” turns into an i-schwa, the second “o” is short,, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ee-kih-NAH-mihk/ – /iː.kə(ɪ).ˈnɑ.mə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Economics
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “c” is hard, the first “o” turns into an i-schwa, the second “o” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ee-kih-NAH-mih-ks//iː.kə(ɪ).ˈnɑ.mə(ɪ).ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

Economical
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “c” is hard, the first “o” turns into an i-schwa, the second “o” is short, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the next “c” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ee-kih-NAH-mih-kəl//iː.kə(ɪ).nɑ.mə(ɪ).kəl/  – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable  –

Economy
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “c” is hard, the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/ee-KAH-nuh-mee//iː.ˈkɑ.nə(ʌ).miː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Eco-Tourism
 – For this term, the “E” is long, the “c” is hard, the “o” is long, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the long letter “o”, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “u” and the “r” (this is a product of transitioning from one sound to the next), and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EE-ko-too-wr-ih-zəm//ˈiː.ko.tu.wɚ.ə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ed

Edge
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “dg” combination is pronounced simply like the single soft letter “g”, and the final “e” is silent

/eh-dʒ/ – /ɛ.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable –

Edit
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “d” is a “flap-d”, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/EH-dih[t]//ˈɛ.ɾə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Edited
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “d” is a “flap-d”, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “e” of the “-ed” ending is an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

/EH-dih.tih[d]//ˈɛ.ɾə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Edition
 – For this word, the “E” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə-DIH-shihn/ – /ə.ˈdɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Editor
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “o” disappears

/EH-dih-t’r/ – /ˈɛ.ɾə(ɪ).tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Educate
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “d” is pronounced like a soft “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /EH-dʒə-kay[t]//ˈɛ.dʒə.ke[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Educated
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “d” is pronounced like a soft “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard,, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the flap-t – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

– /EH-dʒə-kay-dih[d]//ˈɛ.dʒə.ke.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Education
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” turns into an true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /eh-dʒə-KAY-shihn//ɛ.dʒə.ˈkeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Educational
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” turns into an true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /eh-dʒə-KAY-shih-nəl//ɛ.dʒə.ˈkeiː.ʃə(ɪ).nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Ef

Effect
 – For this word, the “E” turns into a true-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

– /ə-FEH[K]-t/ – /ə.ˈfɛ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Effective
 – For this word, the “E” turns into a true-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/ə-FEH[K]-tihv/ – /ə.ˈfɛ[k].tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Effectively
 – For this word, the “E” turns into a true-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “i” is an i-schwa, the third “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ə-FEH[K]-tihv-lee/ – /ə.ˈfɛk.tə(ɪ)v.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Effectiveness
 – For this word, the “E” turns into a true-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/ə-FEH[K]-tihv-nihs/ – /ə.ˈfɛ[k].tə(ɪ)v.nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Efficiency
 – For this word, for this word, the “E” turns into a true-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the second “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/ə-FIH-shin-see//ə.ˈfɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Efficient
 – For this word, the “E” turns into a true-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ə-FIH-shihn-[t]//ə.ˈfɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Effort
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “ff” is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /EH-f’r-[t]//ˈɛ.fɚ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Efforts
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “ff” is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “o” disappears

– /EH-f’r-ts//ˈɛ.fɚ.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

Eg

Egg
 – For this word, the “E” is short, and the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “g” but is (often) almost stopped

/eh-[g]/ – /ɛ.[g]/ – Notice also that the hard “g” ending acts as a second syllable –

Egypt
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “g” is soft, the “y” turns into an i-schwa, and the “p” is (usually) stopped

/EE-dʒih[p]-t//ˈiː.dʒə(ɪ)[p].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Egyptian
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “g” is soft, the “y” turns into an i-schwa, and the “p” is almost stopped, the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/ee-dʒIH[P]-shihn//iː.ˈdʒə(ɪ)[p].ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Eh

Ei

Eiffel
 – For this word, the “Ei” combination is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f”, and the “e” turns into a true-schwa

/IGH-fəl/ – /ˈʌiː.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Eight
 – For this word, the “Ei” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “gh” combination is silent, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ay[t]/ – /eiː[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Eighteen
 – For this word, the “Ei” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “gh” combination causes a guttural stop, and for the “teen” suffix – the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ay’-TEEN/ – /eiːʔ.ˈtiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Eighth
 – For this word, the “Ei” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “gh” combination causes a slight guttural stop, there is a phatom stopped “t” in-between the “gh” and the “th” combination, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/AY‘-[t]th/ – /ˈeiːʔ.[t]θ/ – Notice that the “[t]th” ending acts as a second syllable and that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable

Eighties
 – For this word, the “Ei” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “gh” combination is silent, the “t” (usually) turns into a flap-d, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/AY-deez/ – /ˈeiː.ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Eighty
 – For this word, the “Ei” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “gh” combination is silent, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/AY-dee/ – /ˈeiː.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Eighty-Eight
 – For this word, the first “Ei” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the first “gh” combination is silent, the “t” is a flap-t, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the second “Ei” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the second “gh” combination is silent, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/ay-dee-AY-[t]/ – /eiː.ɾiː.ˈeiː.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable –

Einstein
 – For this word, both the first and second “Ei” combinations are both pronounced simply like the single long letter “i”

/AIN-stain/ – /ˈaiːn.staiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Eisenhower
 – For this name, the “Ei” combination is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word, “how” or “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IGH-zihn-how-‘r//ˈʌiː.zə(ɪ)n.hau.ɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Either
 – For this word, the “Ei” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “th” combination is voiced, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EE-th’r//ˈiː.ðɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ej

Ek

El

Elbow
 – For this word, “E” is short, and the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”)

/EHL-boh//ˈɛl.bo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Elder
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EHL-d’r/ – /ˈɛl.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first

Elderly
 – For this word, the “E” is short, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/EHL-d’r-lee//ˈɛl.dɚ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Elect
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the second “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but it (often) stopped

/ee-LEH[K]-t//iː.ˈlɛ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Elected
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /ee-LEHK-dih[d]/ – /iː.ˈlɛk.də(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Election
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ee-LEHK-shihn/ – /iː.ˈlɛk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Electric
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the second “e” is short, the first “c” is hard but is often stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-LEH[K]-chrih[k]/ – /iː.ˈlɛ[k].tʃɹə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Electrical
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the second “e” is short, the first “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ih-LEH[K]-chrih-kəl/ – /ə(ɪ).ˈlɛ[k].tʃɹə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Electrician
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the second “e” is short, the first “c” is hard but is often stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “i” is short, and for the “-cian” – the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination and the “a” turns into an “i” is an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-le[k]-CHRIH-shin/ – /iː.lɛ[k].ˈtʃɹɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Electricity
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is short, the second “c” is soft, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ee-lek-TRIH-sih-dee//iː.lɛk.tʃɹɪ.sə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Electrodes
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (almost) stopped, the third “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ih-LEH[K]-chroh-dz//ə(ɪ).ˈlɛ[k].tʃɹo.dz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “dz” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Electromagnetic (Electro-Magnetic)
– For this word, the “E” is long, the second “e” is short, the first “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” is long, the “a” is short, the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the third “e” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-leh[k]-chroh-mæ[g]-NEH-dih[k]//iː.ˌlɛ[k].tʃɹo.mæ[g].ˈnɛ.ɾə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the the major stress is on the fifth syllable  –

Electronic
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-leh[k]-CHRAH-nih[k]//iː.lɛ[k]ˈtʃɹɑ.nə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Electronics
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the first “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə-le[k]-CHRAH-ni-ks//ə.lɛ[k]ˈtʃɹɑ.nə(ɪ).ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a fifth syllable

Elegant
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EH-lih-gihn[t]//ˈɛ.lə(ɪ).gə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Element
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” is turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EH-lih-mihn[t]//ˈɛ.lə(ɪ).mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Elementary
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” turns into an true-schwa, the third “e” is short, and since the “a” disappears – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to fact that the “a” disappears, making the letter “r” the next sound), and the “a” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /ehl-ə-MEHN-chree//ɛ.lə(ɪ).ˈmɛn.tʃɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Elevator
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EH-lə-vay-d’r//ˈɛ.lə.veiː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Eleven
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the second “e” is short, and the third “e” turns into an i-schwa

/ee-LEH-vihn//iːˈlɛ.və(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Elicit
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the first “i” is short, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ih-LIH-sih[t]//ə(ɪ).ˈlɪ.sə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Elite
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /ee-LEE[T]//iː.ˈliː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Elites
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the second “e” is silent

– /ee-LEE-ts//iː.ˈliː.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable –

Else
 – For this word, the “E” is short, and the final “e” is silent

/ehls//ɛls/

Elsewhere (Else-Where)
– For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” is silent, the “wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “w”, the third “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/EHLS-wayr//ˈɛls.weɪɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Elusive
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “u” is long, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is
the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-LOO-sihv//iː.ˈlu.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Em

E-Mail
 – For this word, the “E” is long, and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it)

– /EE-mayl//ˈiː-meɪl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Embarrass
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second letter “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-BAYR-ihs//ə(ɪ)m.ˈbeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Embarrassed
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/ihm-BAYR-ih-st/ – /ə(ɪ)mˈbeɪɹ.ə(ɪ).st/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Embarrassing
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwathe first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-BAYR-ih-sing//ə(ɪ)mˈbeɪɹ.ə(ɪ).sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Embarrassment
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwathe first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-BAYR-ihs-mihn[t]//ə(ɪ)mˈbeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)s.mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Embassy
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/EHM-bə.see/ – /ˈɛm.bə.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Embedded
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “dd” combination is pronounced like the single flap-d (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

/ihm-BEH-dih[d]//ə(ɪ)m.ˈbɛ.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Ember
 – For this word, the “E” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /EHM-b’r//ˈɛm.bɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the the first syllable

Embezzlement
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “zz” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “z”(this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “z” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the third “e” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/əm-BEH-zəl-mihn[t]//əm.ˈbɛ.zəl.mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Embrace
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/ihm-BRAYS/ – /ə(ɪ)m.ˈbɹeiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Emerald
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” disappears, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/EHM-rəl[d]/ – /ˈɛm.ɹəl[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Emerge
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the second “e” disappears, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/ee-M’Rdʒ//iː.ˈmɚdʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Emerged
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the second “e” disappears, the “g” is soft, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the soft letter “g” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “d”

/ee-M’R-tʒ-d//iː.ˈmɚ.tʒ.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Emergency
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the second “e” disappears, the “g” is soft, the third “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/ee-M’R-dʒihn-see//iː.ˈmɚ.dʒə(ɪ)n.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Emerging
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the second “e” disappears, the first “g” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-M’R-dʒing//iː.ˈmɚ.dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Emigrate
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard,, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EH-mih-gray[t]/ – /ˈɛ.mə(ɪ).gɹe[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Emirates
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “i” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EH-mə-rih-ts//ˈɛ.mə.ɹə(ɪ).ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Emit
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /ee-MIH[T]//iː.ˈmɪ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Emotion
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the first “o” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-MOH-shin//iː.ˈmo.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Emotional
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the first “o” is long, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-MOH-shihn-əl/ – /iː.ˈmo.ʃə(ɪ)n.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Empathetic
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the second “e” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehm-puh-THEH-dih[k]//ˌɛm.pə(ʌ).ˈθɛ.ɾə(ɪ)[k] / – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Empathy
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “th” combination is un-voiced, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/EHM-puh-thee//ˈɛm.pə.θi ː / – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Emphasis
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-sis” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EHM-fuh-sihs//ˈɛm.fə(ʌ).sə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Emphasize
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EHM-fuh-saiz//ˈɛm.fə(ʌ).saiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Empire
 – For this word, the “E” is short, and for the “-ire” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EHM-pigh-yr//ˈɛm.pʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Employ
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, and the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “boy” or “toy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /ihm-PLOY//ə(ɪ)m.ˈploiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Employee
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is pronounced like the “oy” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “y” and the “ee” combination (this is a product of the transition from one vowel sound to another), and the “ee” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /ihm-PLOY-yee//ə(ɪ)m.ˈploiː.jiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable – 

Employees
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “toy” or “boy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “y” and the “ee” combination (this is a product of the transition from one vowel sound to another), the “ee” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /ihm-PLOY-yeez//ə(ɪ)m.ˈploiː.jiːz/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Employer
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “toy” or “boy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “y” and the “e” (this is a product of the transition from one vowel sound to another), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-PLOY-yr//ə(ɪ)m.ˈploiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Employers
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “toy” or “boy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “y” and the “e” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to another), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ihm-PLOY-yr-z//ə(ɪ)m.ˈploiː.jɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Employment
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “toy” or “boy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-PLOY-min[t]//ə(ɪ)m.ˈploiː.mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Empty
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/EHM[P]-tee//ˈɛm[p].tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

En

Enable (en-Able)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/ihn-AY-bəl//ə(ɪ)n.ˈe.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Encircle (en-Circle) – For this word, the “E” is short, the first “c” is soft, the “i” disappears, the second “c” is hard, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “c” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the last “e” is silent

/ehn-S’R-kəl/ – /ɛn.ˈsɚ.kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Encounter (en-Counter)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-COWN-t’r/ – /ə(ɪ)n.ˈkaun.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Encourage (en-Courage)
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “c” is hard, the “ou” combination disappears, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ehn-K’R-ihdʒ//ɛn.ˈkəɹ.ə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Encouraged (en-Courage-ed)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ou” combination disappears, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the soft “g” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final (according to pronunciation “rules”) should be pronounced like the letter “d” – but due to the soft “g” sound directly before it – is pronounced almost like the letter “t” and it almost stopped

/ehn-K’R-ihtʃ-[t]//ɛn.ˈkɚ.ə(ɪ)tʃ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable, and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Encourages (en-Courage-s)
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “c” is hard, the “ou” combination disappears, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and since the word is plural – the “e” merges with the “-es” ending and turns into an i-schwa,  and  final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ehn-K’R-ihdʒ-ihz/ – /ɛn.ˈkəɹ.ə(ɪ)dʒ.ə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Encouragement (en-Courage-ment)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ou” combination disappears, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-K’R-ihdʒ-mihn-[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈkɚ.ə(ɪ)dʒ.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

Encouraging (en-Courage-ing)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ou” combination disappears, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-K’R-ih-dʒing//ə(ɪ)n.ˈkɚ.ə(ɪ).dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Encrypted (en-Crypt-ed)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “p” is (usually) stopped, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihn-KRIH[P]-dih[d]/ – /ə(ɪ)n.ˈkɹɪ[p].də(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

End
 – For this word, the “E” is short, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/ehn-[d]//ɛn.[d]/

Endangered (en-Danger-ed)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

/ihn-DAYN-dʒ’r-[d]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈdeiːn.dʒɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Endeavor
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-DEH-v’r//ə(ɪ)n.ˈdɛ.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Ending
 – For this word, the “E” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EHN-ding//ˈɛn.dɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Endorsement
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the first “e” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-DOHRS-mihn[t]/ – /ə(ɪ)n.ˈdoɹs.mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Endure
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “u” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/ihn-DOOR//ə(ɪ)n.ˈduɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Enduring
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “u” disappears, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-D’R-ing//ə(ɪ)n.ˈdɚɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Enemies
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/EH-nih-meez//ˈɛ.nə(ɪ).miːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Enemy
 – For this word, the first “E” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/EH-nə-mee//ˈɛ.nə.miː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Energetic
 – For this word, the first “E” is short, the second “e” disappears, the “g” is soft, the third “e” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/eh-n’r-dʒEH-di[k]//ˌɛ.nɚ.ˈdʒɛ.ɾə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Energy
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” disappears, the “g” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/EH-n’r-dʒee//ˈɛ.nɚ.dʒiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Enforce
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/ihn-FOHR-s//ə(ɪ)n.ˈfoɹ.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Engage
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the first “g” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the second “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /ehn-GAYdʒ/ – /ɛn.geiːdʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Engaged
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the first “g” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the second “g” is soft, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the soft “g” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/ehn-GAYdʒ-d/ – /ɛn.ˈgeiːdʒ.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Engaging
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the first “g” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the second “g” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-GAY-dʒing//ə(ɪ)n.ˈgeiː.dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Engender (en-Gender)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, the second “e” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihn-dʒEHN-d’r//ə(ɪ)n.ˈdʒɛn.dɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Engine
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “g” is soft, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/EHN-dʒə(ɪ)n//ˈɛn.dʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Engineer
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “g” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ehn-dʒihn-EER//ˌɛn.dʒə(ɪ)n.ˈiːɹ/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Engineering
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “g” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ehn-gih-NEER-ing//ˌɛn.dʒə(ɪ)n.ˈiːɹ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

England
– For this word, the “En” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination, the “g” is hard (pronounced separately from the letter “n”), and for the “-land” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHNG-glihn-[d]//ˈɪŋ.glə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable –

English
 – For this word, the “En” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination, the “g” is hard (separate from the “ng” combination), and the “i” is an i-schwa

– /ING-glihsh//ˈɪŋ.glə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Enhance
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” is short, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-HæNS//ə(ɪ)n.ˈhæns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Enhanced
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” is short, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /ihn-HæNS[T]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈhæns[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Enjoy (en-Joy)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), and the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “toy” or “boy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-dʒOY//ə(ɪ)n.ˈdʒoiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Enjoyed (en-Joy-ed)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “boy” or “toy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the “oy” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ehn-dʒOY[D]//ɛn.ˈdʒoiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Enjoyment (en-Joy-ment)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “boy” or “toy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-dʒOY-mihn[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈdʒoiː.mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Enlarge (en-Large)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/ihn-LAHRdʒ//ə(ɪ)n.ˈlɑɹdʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Enlarging (en-Large-ing)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-LAHR-dʒing//ə(ɪ)n.ˈlɑɹ.dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Enormous
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “o” is long, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-NOHR-mihs//iː.ˈnoɹ.mə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Enough
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the short letter “u”, and the “gh” combination is pronounced like the letter “f”

/ee-NUHF//iː.ˈnʌf/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Ensure (en-Sure)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-sure” suffix – the “s” is pronounced like voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-SHOOR//ə(ɪ)n.ˈʃuɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Entail (en-Tail)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it)

/ihn-TAYL//ə(ɪ)n.ˈteɪl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Enter
 – For this word, the “E” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EHN-t’r//ˈɛn.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Entered
 – For this word, the “E” is short, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/EHN-t’r-[d]//ˈɛn.tɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Enterprise
 – For this word, the “E” is short, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

– /EHN-t’r-praiz//ˈɛn.tɚ.pɹaiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Enterprises
 – For this word, the “E” is short, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the third “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” also is pronounced like the letter “z”

– /EHN-t’r-prai-zihz//ˈɛn.tɚ.pɹaiː.zə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Entertain
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” disappears, and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

/ehn-t’r-TAYN//ɛn.tɚ.ˈteiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Entertainer
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” disappearsthe “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehn-t’r-TAY-n’r//ɛn.tɚ.ˈteiː.nɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Entertaining
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” disappears,the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue

/ehn-t’r-TAY-ning//ɛn.tɚ.ˈteiː.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Entertainment
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” disappears,the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ehn-t’r-TAYN-mihn[t]//ɛn.tɚ.ˈteiːn.mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Enthralled (en-Thrall-ed)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihn-THRAWL-[d]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈθɹɔl.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Enthusiasm
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “u” is long, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-asm” suffix – the “a” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is a product of the transition from one sound the next)(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-THOO-zee-æ-zəm//ə(ɪ)n.ˈθu.ziː.æ.zəm/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable, and that the “sm” ending acts as a fifth syllable

Enthusiastic
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “u” is long, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is
(sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-thoo-zee-æS-tih[k]//ə(ɪ)n.ˌθu.ziː.ˈæs.tə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Entire
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ire” combination – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this lettr combination in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-TIGH-yr//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Entirely
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of transitioning from one vowel sound to another), the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-TIGH-yr-lee//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtʌiː.jɚ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Entitle (en-Title)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the second “t” is a flap-t, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “t” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/ihn-TIGH-dəl//ə(ɪ).ˈtʌiː.ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Entrance (en-Trance)
– For this word, the “E” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EHN-chrihns/ – /ˈɛn.tʃɹə(ɪ)ns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Entree
 – For this word, the “E” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “ee” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

/AHN-chray//ˈɑn.tʃɹeiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Entrepreneur
 – For this word, the “E” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “e” turns into a u-schwa, the third “e” also turns into an i-schwa, the “eu” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and there is a phantom letter “w” between the “u” and the final “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)

– /ahn-truh-prih-NOO-wɚ/ – /ɑn.tɹə(ʌ).pɹə(ɪ).ˈnu.wɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fourth syllable

Entrepreneurial
 – For this word, the “E” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it),the second “e” turns into a u-schwa, the third “e” also turns into an i-schwa, the “eu” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and for the “-ial” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ahn-truh-prih-NOO-ree-əl//ɑn.tɹə(ʌ).pɹə(ɪ).ˈnu.ɹiː.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fourth syllable

Entrepreneurs
 – For this word, the “E” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “e” turns into a u-schwa, the third “e” also turns into an i-schwa, the “eu” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and there is a phantom letter “w” between the “u” and the final “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /ahn-truh-prih-NOO-wɚz/ – /ɑn.tɹə(ʌ).pɹə(ɪ).ˈnu.wɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fourth syllable

Entrepreneurship
 – For this word, the “E” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “e” turns into a u-schwa, the third “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “eu” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, there is a phantom letter “w” between the “u” and the final “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-ship” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /ahn-truh-prih-NOO-wɚ-shih[p]/ – /ɑn.tɹə(ʌ).pɹə(ɪ).ˈnu.wɚ.ʃə(ɪ)[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fourth syllable

Entropy
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/EHN-chrə-pee//ˈɛn.tʃɹə.piː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Entry
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/EHN-chree//ˈɛn.tʃɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Envelope (noun)
– For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the “p” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/EHN-vih-loh[p]//ˈɛn.və(ɪ).lo[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Envelopes (noun)
– For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is long, and the “e” is silent

/EHN-vih-loh-ps//ˈɛn.və(ɪ).lo.ps/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ps” ending acts as a separate syllable –

Envelope (verb)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “p” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/ihn-VEH-luh[p]//ˈə(ɪ)n.vɛ.lə(ʌ)[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Envelopes (verb)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and the “e” is silent

/ihn-VEH-luh-ps//ˈə(ɪ)n.vɛ.lə(ʌ).ps/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ps” ending acts as a separate syllable

Enveloped
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “p” is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “p”, the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/ihn-VEH-luh[p]-t/ – /ə(ɪ)n.ˈvɛ.lə(ʌ)[p].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Envious
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /EHN-vee-ihs//ˈɛn.viː.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice that the stress is on the stress is on the first syllable

Environment
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is the product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “o” disappears, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihn-VIGH-yrn-mihn[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈvʌiː.jɚn.mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Environmental
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is the product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “o” disappears, for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihn-vigh-yrn-MEHN-təl//ə(ɪ)n.vʌiː.jɚn.mɛnt.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fourth syllable –

Environmentalist
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is the product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “o” disappears, for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ist” suffix – and the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

 – /ihn-vigh-yrn-MEHN-təl-ih-st/ – /ə(ɪ)n.vʌiː.jɚn.mɛnt.əl.ə(ɪ).st/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

Envy
 – For this word, the “E” is short, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /EHN-vee//ˈɛn.viː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Eo

Ep

Epi-
 – For this prefix, the “E” is short, and the “i” (when added to any word) is an i-schwa

/EH-pih//ˈɛ.pə(ɪ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Epidemic
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “e” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/eh-pih-DEH-mih[k]//ɛ.pə(ɪ)ˈdɛ.mə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Epidermal
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/eh-pih-D’R-məl//ɛ.pə(ɪ).ˈdɚ.məl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Epidermis
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “e” disappears, and the second “i” is an i-schwa

/eh-pih-D’R-mihs//ɛ.pə(ɪ).ˈdɚ.mə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Epidural
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “u” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/eh-pih-D’R-əl//ɛ.pə(ɪ).ˈdɚ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Epiphany
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “i” is short, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/ih-PIH-fih-nee/ – /ə(ɪ).ˈpɪ.fə(ɪ).niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Epitome
 – For this word, the “E” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “t” turns into a flap-d, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “e” is long

/ə-PIH-də-mee/ – /ə.ˈpɪ.ɾə.miː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Eq

Equal
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /EE-kwəl//ˈiː.kwəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Equality
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-KWAWL-ih-dee//iː.ˈkwɔl.ə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Equally
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/EE-kwə-lee//ˈiː.kwə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Equals
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “qu” combination is pronounced like a “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /EE-kwəlz//ˈiː.kwəlz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Equipment
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “qu” combination is pronounced like a “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ee-KWIH[P]-mihn[t]//iː.ˈkwɪ[p].mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Equipped
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) but is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “p” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/ee-KWIH[P]-t/ – /iː.ˈkwɪ[p].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable –

Equity
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/EH-kwih-dee/ – /ˈɛ.kwɪ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Equivalent
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-KWIH-vuh-lihn[t]//iː.ˈkwɪ.və(ʌ)..lə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Er

Era
 – For this word, the “E” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “a” turns into a u-schwa

/AYR-uh/ – /ˈeɪɹ.ə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Erasable (Erase-able)
– For this word, the “E” is long, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-RAY-suh.bəl//iː.ˈɹeiː.sə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Eraser
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-RAY-s’r//iː.ˈɹeiː.sɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Errand
 – For this word, the “E” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “d” is (often) stopped

/AYR-ihn-[d]//ˈeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Errands
 – For this word, the “E” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “d” is almost stopped, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/AYR-ihn-[d]z//ˈeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)n.[d]z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “dz” ending acts as a third syllable –

Erratic
 – For this word, the “E” turns into a true-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is sometimes stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə--dih[k]//ə.ˈɹæ.ɾə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Error
 – For this word, the “E” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r”, and the “o” disappears

/AYR-r’r//ˈeɪɹ.ɹɚ/ – Notice also that –

 

Es

Escalator
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “c” is hard, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EHS-kə-lay-d’r//ˈɛs.kə.leiː.dɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Escalators
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “c” is hard, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/EHS-kə-lay-d’r.z//ˈɛs.kə.leiː.dɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable

Escapade
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “c” is hard, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ade” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EHS-kuh-pay[d]//ˈɛs.kə(ʌ).pe[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Escape
 – For this word, the “E” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “p” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/ə-SKAY[P]//ə.ˈske[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Especially
 – For this word, the “E” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, for the “-cial” suffix – the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue) but here the “l” merges with the “-ly” suffix to form an “ll” combination which is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /ə-SPEH-shəl-ee//ə.ˈspɛ.ʃəl.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Essay
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s”, and the “ay” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/EH-say//ˈɛ.seiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Essential
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is short, and for the “-tial” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-SEHN-shel/ – /iː.ˈsɛn.ʃəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Essentially
 – For this word, the “E” turns into a true-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is short, for the “tial” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), but here the “l” merges with the “-ly” suffix to form an “ll” combination which is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ə-SEHN-shə-lee//ə.ˈsɛn.ʃə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Establish
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is short, and the “i” is an i-schwa

/ih-STæ-blihsh//ə(ɪ).ˈstæ.blə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Established
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, and since the root-word ends with the “sh” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /eh-STæ-blihsh-[t]//ɛ.ˈstæ.blə(ɪ)ʃ.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Estate
 – For this word, the “E” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /eh-STAY[T]//ɛ.ˈste[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Esteem
 – For this word, the “E” turns into a true-schwa, and the “ee” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /eh-STEEM//ɛ.ˈstiːm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Estimate
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EH-stih-may[t]//ˈɛ.stə(ɪ).me[t]/ – Notice also that –

Estimated
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “i” turns into an i-schwa,, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (usually) stopped

– /EHS-tih-may-dih[d]/ – /ˈɛs.tə(ɪ).me.ɾə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Et

Etc.
 – For this abbreviation, we pronounce it as if it was the entire word:

/eh[t]-SEH-d’r-uh//ɛ[t].ˈsɛ.ɾɚ.ə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Etching
 – For this word, the “E” is short, and the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation for this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /EH-ching//ˈɛ.tʃɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Ethical
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “th” combination is un-voiced, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EH-thih-kəl//ˈɛ.θə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ethics
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “th” combination is un-voiced, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EH-thih-ks//ˈɛ.θə(ɪ).ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a third syllable

Ethiopia
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “th” is un-voiced, the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phnatom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “o” is long, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phnatom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “a” is pronounced like the short letter “u”

– /ee-thee-YOH-pee-yuh//iː.θiː.ˈjo.piː.jʌ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Ethiopian
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “th” is un-voiced, the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phnatom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “o” is long, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phnatom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

– /ee-thee-YOH-pee-yihn//iː.θiː.ˈjo.piː.jə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Etiquette
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the letter “k” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “t” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), but is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/EH-dih-kih[t]//ˈɛ.ɾə(ɪ).kə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Eu

Eurasia
 – For this word, the “Eu” combination is pronounced like the consonant letter “Y” and the letter “r” combination, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the final “a” turns into an u-schwa

/y’r-AY-zhuh//jɚ.eiː.ʒə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Eurasian
 – For this word, the “Eu” combination is pronounced like the consonant letter “Y” and the letter “r” combination, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “si”combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/y’r-AY-zhihn//jɚ.eiː.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Euro
 – For this word, the “Eu” combination is pronounced like the consonant letter “Y” and the letter “r” combination, and the “o” is long

/Y’R-oh//ˈjɚ.o/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Europe
 – For this word, the “Eu” combination is pronounced like the consonant letter “Y” and the letter “r” combination, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “p” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/Y’R-ə[p]/ – /ˈjɚ.ə[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

European
 – For this word, the “Eu” combination is pronounced like the consonant letter “Y” and the letter “r” combination, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is long, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/y’r-uh-PEE-ihn/ – /jɚ.ə(ʌ).ˈpiː.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Euphemism
 – For this word, the “Eu” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/YOU-fə-mih-zəm/ – /ˈju.fə.mə(ɪ).səm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Ev

Evacuate
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “a” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/ee--kyou-ay[t]//iː.ˈvæ.kju.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Evacuation
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “a” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-væ-kyou-AY-shihn//iː.væ.kju.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fourth syllable

Evaluate
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “a” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second,, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-VæL-you-ay[t]/ – /iː.ˈvæl.ju.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Evaluation
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the first “a” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, there is a phantom “w” in-between the “u” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next) the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-væl-you-WAY-shihn/ – /ee.ˌvæl.ju.ˈweiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Evasion
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ee-VAY-zhihn//iː.ˈveiː.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Eve
 – For this word, the “E” is long, and the second “e” is silent

/eev//iːv/

Even
 – For this word, the “E” is long, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EE-vihn//ˈiː.və(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Evening
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the second “e” disappears, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /EEV-ning//ˈiːv.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Event
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the second “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /ee-VEHN[T]//iː.ˈvɛn[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Events
 – For this word, the “E” is long, and the second “e” is short

– /ee-VEHN-ts//iː.ˈvɛn.ts/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

Eventually
 – For this word, the “E” is long, the second “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ee-VEHN-chə-lee//iː.ˈvɛn.tʃə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Ever
 – For this word, the “E” is short, and the second “e” disappears

– /EH-v’r//ˈɛ.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Every
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/EH-vree//ˈɛ.vɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Everybody (Every-body)
– For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” disappears, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /EHV-ree-buh-dee//ˈɛv.ɹiː.bʌ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Everyday (Every-day)
– For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-day” suffix – the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/eh-vree-day//ɛ.vɹiː.deiː/ – Notice also that there is no discernible stress –

Everyone (Every-one)
– For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” disappears, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “y” and the “o”, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/EH-vree-wuhn//ˈɛ.vɹiː.wə(ʌ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Everything (Every-thing)
– For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” disappears, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “th” combination is un-voiced, and the and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EH-vree-thing//ˈɛ.vɹiː.θɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Everywhere (Every-where)
– For this word, the “E” is short, the second “e” disappears, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “w”, the third “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/EH-vree-wayr//ˈɛ.vɹiː.weɪɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Evidence
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EH-vih-dihns//ˈɛ.və(ɪ).də(ɪ)ns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Evil
 – For this word, the “e” is long, and the “i” turns into a true-schwa

– /EE-vəl//ˈiː.vəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Evolve
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is short, and the final “e” is silent

/ih-VAHL-v//ə(ɪ).ˈvɑl.v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “v” ending acts as a separate syllable

Ew

Exa

Exacerbating
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, the first “a” is short, the “c” is soft, the “e” disappearsthe second “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehg--s’r-bay-ding//ɛg.ˈzæ.sɚ.be.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Exact
 – For this word,the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, the first “a” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped

/ihg-[K]-t-//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzæ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Exactly
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, the first “a” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, the “t” is almost stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ihg-[K]-[t]-lee//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzæ[k].[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Exaggerate
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, the “a” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ehg--dʒ’r-ay[t]/ – /ɛg.ˈzæ.dʒɚ.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Exaggerated
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, the first “a” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single soft letter “g”,, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped 

/ihg--dʒ’r-ay-dih[d]//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzæ.dʒɚ.e.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Exaggeration
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, the first “a” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single soft letter “g”(this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” disappears, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihg--dʒ’r-AY-shihn/ – /ə(ɪ)g.ˌzæ.dʒɚ.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

Exam
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, and the “a” is short,

/ihg-ZæM//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzæm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Examination
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, the first “a” is short, the “i” is short, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ehg-zæm-ih-NAY-shihn//ɛg.ˌzæm.ɪ.ˈneiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Examine
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, the “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/ihg--mihn//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzæ,mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Example
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, and “a” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

– /ehg-ZæM-pəl//ɛg.ˈzæm.pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Examples
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, and “a” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is silent, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /ehg-ZæM-pəl-z//ɛg.ˈzæm.pəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Exams
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, the “a” is short, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ehg-ZæM-z//ɛg.ˈzæm.z/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable, and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

Exc

Excavating
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “c” is silent, the first “a” turns into u-schwa, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EH-ks-kuh-vay-ding//ˈɛ.ks.kə(ʌ).ve.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Exceed
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihk-SEE[D]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Excel
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, and the second “e” is short

/ihk-SEHL//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsɛl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Excellent
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EHK-sə-lihn-[t]//ˈɛk.sə.lə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Except
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like letter “k”, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, and the “p” is (usually) stopped

– /ehk-SEH[P]-t//ɛk.ˈsɛ[p].t/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable –

Exception
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, the “p” is almost stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SEHP-shihn//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsɛp.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Excess
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft”, and for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SEHS//ə(ɪ)kˈsɛs / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Excessive
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehk-SEH-sihv//ɛk.ˈsɛ.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Excessively
 – For this word the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k” combination, the “c” is soft,, and for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /ehk-SEH-sihv-lee//ɛk.ˈsɛ.sə(ɪ)v.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Exchange (ex-Change)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /ihks-CHAYNdʒ//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈtʃeiːndʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Exchanging (ex-Change-ing)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the first “g” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-s-CHAYN-dʒing-//ə(ɪ)k.s.ˈtʃeiːn.dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Excite
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/ihk-SIGH[T]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsʌiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Excited
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihk-SIGH-dih[d]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsʌiːɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Excitement
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the second “e” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SIGH[T]-mihn-[t]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsʌiː[t].mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Exciting
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is soft, the first “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SIGH-ding//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsʌiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Exclude
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is hard, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/ihks-KLOO[D]//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈklu[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Excluding
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the letter “k”, the “c” is hard, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihks-KLOO-ding//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈkluɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Exclusive
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “c” is hard, the “u” is long, and for the “-sive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehks-KLOO-sihv//ɛks.ˈklu.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Exclusivity
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “c” is hard, the “u” is long, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehks-kloo-SIH-vih-dee//ɛks.klu.ˈsɪ.və(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Excursion
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “c” is hard, the “u” disappears, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihk-SK’R-zhuhn/ – /ə(ɪ)ks.ˈkəɹ.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Excuse
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the final “e” is silent

/ihk-SKYOOS//ə(ɪ)k.ˈskjus/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Exe

Execute
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” turns into an i-scwha, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /EHKS-ih-kyoo[t]//ˈɛk.sə(ɪ).kju[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Executed
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” turns into an i-scwha, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /EHKS-ih-kyoo-dih[d]//ˈɛk.sə(ɪ).kju.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Executive
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihg-ZEH-kyoo-dihv/ – /ə(ɪ)g.ˈzɛk.ju.ɾə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Executives
 – For this word, the “E” turns into a true-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /ihg-ZEHK-you-tihv-z/ – /ə(ɪ)g.ˈzɛ.kju.tə(ɪ)v.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Exercise
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” disappears, the “c” is soft, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

– /EHK-s’r-saiz//ˈɛks.ɚ.saɪz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Exercises
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” disappears, the “c” is soft, the “i” is long, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the third “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/EHK-s’r-sai-zihz/ – /ˈɛk.sɚ.saiː.zə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Exf

Exfoliating
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combination, the “o” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ehks-FOH-lee-ay-ding//ɛks.ˈfo.liː.e.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Exh

Exhaust
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” sounds like a “gz” combination, the “h” is silent, the “au” combination is pronounced like an “aw” combination, and the final letter “t” is (often) stopped

– /ihg-ZAWS-[t]//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzɔs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Exhausted
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” sounds like a “gz” combination, the “h” is silent, the “au” combination is pronounced like an “aw” combination, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is pronounced like an i-schwa and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /ihg-ZAWS-tih[d]//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzɔs.tə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Exhaustion
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” sounds like a “gz” combination, the “h” is silent, the “au” combination is pronounced like an “aw” combination, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “ch” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihg-ZAWS-chən/ – /ə(ɪ)g.ˈzɔs.tʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Exhibit
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” sounds like a “gz” combination, the “h” is silent, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/ihg-ZIH-bih[t]//ə(ɪ)g.ˈzɪ.bə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Exhibition
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehk-sih-BIH-shihn//ɛk.sə(ɪ)ˈbɪ.ʃə ( ɪ )n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Exhilaration
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, the “h” is silent, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “a” disappears, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihg-zeh-l’r-AY-shihn//ə(ɪ)g.ˌzə(ɪ).lɚ.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Exi

Exist
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, and the “i” is short, and the “t” ending is (sometimes) stopped

– /ehg-ZIHS-[t]//ɛg.ˈzɪs.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable, and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Existence
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, the “i” is short, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ehgz-IHS-tihns//ɛg.ˈzɪs.tə(ɪ)ns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Existing
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “gz” combination, the “i” is short,  and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehg-ZIHS-ting/ – /ɛg.ˈzɪs.tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Exit
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/EHK-si[t]//ˈɛk.sə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that –

Exo

Exorbitant
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “gz” combination (this is one of TWO  standard pronunciations of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehg-ZOHR-bih-tihn-[t]//ɛg.ˈzoɹ.bə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable –

Exp

Expand
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and the “a” is short, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

– /ihks-PæN[D]//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpæn[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Expansion
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “a” is short, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihks-PæN-shihn//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpæn.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Expect
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped

/ihk-SPEH[K]T//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɛ[k]t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Expectancy
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is also short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ancy” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihks-PEH[K]-tihn-see//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpɛ[k].tə(ɪ)n.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Expectation
 – For this word, The “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehk-speh[k]-TAY-shihn//ɛk.spɛ[k].ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Expectations
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /ehks-peh[k]-TAY-shihnz//ɛks.pɛ[k].ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)nz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Expected
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is also short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /ihks-PHEK-tih[d]/ – /ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɛk.tə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Expects
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but it (often) stopped

– /ihks-PE[K]-ts//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɛ[k].ts/ –Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable, and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

Expenditure
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SPEHN-dih-ch’r//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɛn.də(ɪ).tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Expense
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, and the final “e” is silent

/ihk-SPEHNS//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsɛns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Expenses
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, the third “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ihk-SPEHN-sihz/ – /ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɛn.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Expensive
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination,  the second “e” is short, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihks-PEHN-sihv//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpɛn.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Experience
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “e” of the “-ence” suffix (this is a product of the transition from one vowel sound to the next), and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihks-PEER-ee-yihns/ – /ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpiːɹ.iː.jɪns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Experienced
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “e” of the “-ence” suffix (this is a product of the transition from one vowel sound to the next), for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending (combined with the “e” engins of the root-word – the “e” is never doubled) is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /ehks-PEER-ee-yihns-[t]//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpiːɹ.iː.jə(ɪ)ns.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable –

Experiment
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehks-PEER-ih-mihn-[t]//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpiːɹə(ɪ).mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable –

Experimentation
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and or the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehks-peer-ih-mihn-TAY-shihn//ə(ɪ)ks.piːɹə(ɪ).mə(ɪ)n.ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable, that the major stress is on the fifth syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable –

Expert
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “e” disappears, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/EHK-sp’r-[t]//ˈɛks.pɚ[t]/ – Notice also that –

Expertise
 – For this word, For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combination, the second “e” disappears, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “e” is silent

– /ehks-p’r-TEES//ɛks.pɚ.ˈtiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Experts
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combination, and the second “e” disappears

– /EHKS-p’r-ts//ˈɛks.pɚ.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

Expiration
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “i” disappearsthe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehks-p’r-AY-shihn//ɛks.pɚ.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Expire
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from the vowel sound to the “r” sound), and the final “e” is silent

/ihks-PIGH-yr//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Explain
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /ihks-PLAYN//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspleiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Explicitly
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the first “i” is short, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is short, the “t” is (usually) and for the “-ly” suffix – the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/ihks-PLIH-sih[t]-lee//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈplɪ.sɪ[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Explained
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a (often) stopped

– /ihks-PLAYN-[d]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspleiːn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Explode
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/ihk-SPLOH[D]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsplo[ɾ]/ – Notice also that – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Exploded
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” is long, the first “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

– /ihks-PLOH-dih[d]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsplo.ɾə(ʌ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Exploit
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ehks-PLOY[T]/ – /ə(ɪ)k.ˈsploiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Exploitative
 – For this word there are two common pronunciations:

For the first pronunciation:  The “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combination, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihks-PLOY-duh-tihv/ – /ə(ɪ)k.ˈsploiː.ɾə(ʌ).tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress on the second syllable –

For the second pronunciation:  The “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ive” suffix – “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehks-ploy-TAY-dihv/ – /ɛks.ploiː.ˈte.ɾə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

Explore
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/ihks-PLOHR//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsploɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Explosion
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” is long, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SPLOH-zhihn//ə(ɪ)k.ˈsplo.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Exponentially
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the second “e” is short, for the “tial” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /ehks-puh-NEHN-shuh-lee//ˌɛks.bə(ʌ).ˈnɛn.ʃəl.iː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Export
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /EHKS-pohr-[t]//ˈɛks.poɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Expose
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the “e” is silent

– /ehks-POHZ/ – /ə(ɪ)k.ˈspoz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Exposed
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /ehks-POHZ-[d]//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspoz.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Exposing
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ehk-SPOH-zing//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspo.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Exposure
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “p” is pronounced almost like the letter “b”, the “o” is long, and for the “-sure” suffix – the “s” is pronounced like voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ehks-POH-zh’r//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspo.ʒəɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Express (ex-Press)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SPREHS//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɹɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Expressing (ex-Press-ing)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SPREH-sing//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɹɛ.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Expression (ex-Press-ion)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination merges with the “-sion” combination and does not affect the pronunciation in any way, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-SPREH-shihn//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɹɛ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Expressive (ex-Press-ive)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihks-PREH-sihv//ə(ɪ)k.ˈspɹɛ.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Ext

Extend
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, and the final “d” if (often) stopped

/ihks-TEHN-[d]//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈtɛn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the final “d” (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Extension
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihk-STEHN-shihn//ə(ɪ)k.ˈstɛn.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Extensive
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihks-TEHN-sihv//ə(ɪ)k.ˈtɛn.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Extent
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihks-TEHN-[t]//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈtɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

External
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and for the “-ern” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihks-T’R-nəl//ə(ɪ)k.ˈtɚ.nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Extra
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “a” turns into a u-schwa

– /EHKS-chruh//ɛks.ˈtʃɹə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Extraordinary (extra-Ordinary)
– For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” disappears, the “o” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihks-CHROHR-dih-nayr-ee//ə(ɪ)k.ˈstʃɹoɹ.də(ɪ).neɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Extreme
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “e” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/ihks-CHREEM//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈtʃɹiːm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Extremely
 – For this word, the “E” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “e” is long, the third “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ihks-CHREEM-lee//ə(ɪ)ks.ˈtʃɹiːm.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Extrovert
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” disappears, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

– /EKS-chruh-v’r-[t]//ˈɛks.tʃɹə(ʌ).vɚ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Extroverted
 – For this word, the “E” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

– /EKS-chruh-v’r-dih-[d]//ˈɛks.tʃɹə(ʌ).vɚ.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable –

Ey

Eye
 – For this word, the entire word is pronounced exactly the same as the letter “I” (the long “i” pronunciation)

/ai//aiː/

Eyes
 – For this word, the “eye” combination is pronounced exactly the same as the letter “I” (the long “i” pronunciation), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/aiz//aiːz/

 

Ez

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter E ) –


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