– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter F ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.


Ff

 

Fe . Fi . Fl . Fo . Fr . Fu

 

Face
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /fays//feiːs/

Faced
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/FAY-st//ˈfeiː.st/ – Notice also that the “st” ending acts like a second syllable –

Faces
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, the final “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /FAY-sih-z//ˈfeiː.sə(ɪ).z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

Facing
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /FAY-sing//ˈfeiː.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Facilitate
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/fuh-SIH-lih-tay[t]/ – /fə(ʌ).ˈsɪ.lə(ɪ).te[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

Facilitator
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/fuh-SIH-lih-tay-d’r/ – /fə(ʌ).ˈsɪ.lə(ɪ).te.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

Facilities
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/fə-SIH-lə-deez/ – /fə.ˈsɪ.lə.ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Facility
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/fə-SIH-lə-dee/ – /fə.ˈsɪ.lə.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Fact
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/fæ[c]-t/ – /fæ[c].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable –

Factor
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped,  the “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/[K]-d’r/ – /ˈfæk.dɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Factors
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/[K]-d’r-z/ – /ˈfæk.dɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Factory
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “c” is hard, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /[K]-chree//ˈfæ[k].tʃɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Factual
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “u” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/[K]-choo-wəl/ – /fæ[k].tʃu.wəl/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable –

Faculty
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /-kəl-tee/ – /ˈfæ.kəl.tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Fahrenheit
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “h” is silent, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the second “h” is pronounced,  the “ei” combination is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/FAYR-ihn-high-[t]//ˈfeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)n.hʌiː.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Fail
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it)

/fayl/ – /feɪl/ –

Failed
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and since the root-word ends with the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/FAYL-[d]//ˈfeɪl.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable –

Failing
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FAYL-ing//ˈfeɪl.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Failure
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and for the “-ure” suffix – the “u” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y”, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /FAYL-y’r//ˈfeɪl.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Faint
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “t” is (usually) stopped

/fayn-[t]/ – /feiːn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Fair
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it)

/fayr/ – /feɪɹ/ –

Fairly
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/FAYR-lee/ – /ˈfeɪɹ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Faith
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/fay-th//ˈfeiː.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable –

Faithful (Faith-full)
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “th” combination is un-voiced, and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FAYTH-fəl//ˈfeiːθ.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Faithfully (Faith-fully)
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “th” combination is un-voiced, and for the “-fully” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FAYTH-fə-lee//ˈfeiːθ.fə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Fall
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/fawl/ – /fɔl/ –

False
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/fawl-s/ – /fɔl.s/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable

Fame
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/faym/ – /feiːm/ –

Famed
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and since the root-word ends with the letter “m” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/faym-[d]//feiːm.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Familiar
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “a” disappears

– /fə-MIHL-ee-yr//fə.ˈmɪl.iː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Familiarize
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “a” disappears, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /fə-MIH-lee-yr-aiz/ – /fə.ˈmɪ.liː.jɚ.aiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Family
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “i” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /FæMlee//ˈfæm.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Famine
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/-mihn//ˈfæ.mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Famous
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /FAY-mihs/ – /ˈfeiː.mə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fan
 – For this word, the “a” is short

/fæn/ – /fæn/ –

Fan-Base
 – For this hyphenated compound word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “e” is silent

– /FæN-bays//ˈfæn.beiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Fancy
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/FæN-see/ /ˈfæn.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fancy
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” turns into an true-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/FæN-tə-see//ˈfæn.tə.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Far
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/fahr/ – /fɑɹ/ –

Farewell
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “e” is silent, the second “e” is short, and the final “ll” combination is pronounced simply like a single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/fayr-WEHL//feɪɹ.ˈwɛl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Farm
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/fahr-m//fɑɹ.m/ – Notice also that the “m” ending acts as a second syllable –

Farmer
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FAHR-m’r//ˈfɑɹ.mɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Farming
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FAHR-ming//ˈfɑɹ.mɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Farther
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “th” combination is voiced, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FAHR-th’r//ˈfɑɹ.ðɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Farthest
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “th” combination is voiced, and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FAHR-thihs-[t]//ˈfɑɹ.ðə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Fascinated
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “sc” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (the “c” is silent), the “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” combinatines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/-sih-nay-dihd//ˈfæ.sə(ɪ).ne.ɾə(ɪ)ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fascinating
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “sc” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (the “c” is silent), the “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” is dropped in order to add the “-ing” suffix, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-sih-nay-ding//ˈfæ.sə(ɪ).ne.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fashion
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “shion” combination is pronounced like the “-tion” combination

– /-shihn//ˈfæ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fashionable (Fashion-able)
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “shion” combination is pronounced like the “tion” combination, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-shihn-uh-bəl//ˈfæ.ʃə(ɪ)n.ə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fashioned
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “shion” combination is pronounced like the “-tion” combination, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/-shihn-[d]//ˈfæ.ʃə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fast
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/fæs[t]//fæs[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Fasten
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is silent, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-sihn//ˈfæ.sə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Faster
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FæS-t’r//ˈfæs.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fastidious
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the first “i” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/fæs-TIH-dee-ihs/ – /fæs.ˈtə(ɪ).ɾiː.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Fat
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/fæ[t]//fæ[t]/

Fatal
– For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is a flap-t, and the second “a” disappears

/FAY-d’l//ˈfeiː.ɾl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Father
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “th” combination is voiced, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FAH-th’r//ˈfɑ.ðɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fathom
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “th” is voiced, and the “o” turns into a u-schwa

/-thuhm/ – /ˈfæ.ðə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Fatigue
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, and the “ue” ending is silent

/fə-TEE[G]/ – /fə.ˈtiː[g]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Fatigued
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “g” is hard, the “u” is silent, and since the root-word, ends with the sound of the hard letter “g” but is (usually) stopped – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/fə-TEE[G]-d/ – /fə.ˈtiː[g].d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Fatten
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “t” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/[T]-ihn//ˈfæ[t].ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Faucet
 – For this word, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “c” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/FAW-sih[t]//ˈfɔ.sə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fault
 – For this word, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/fawl-[t]//fɔl.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Faulty
 – For this word, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/FAWL-tee//ˈfɔl.tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Faux Pas
 – For this term, the “aux” combination is pronounced like the long letter “o”, and the “as” combination is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/foh-PAH//fo.ˈpɑ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Favor
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FAY-v’r//ˈfeiː.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Favorite
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the “e” is silent

– /FAYV-rih[t]//ˈfeiːv.ɹɪ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Favoritism
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /FAYV-rih-tih-zəm//ˈfeiːv.ɹə(ɪ).tə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fe

Fear
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/feer//fiːɹ/

Feather
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “th” combination is un-voiced, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FEH-th’r//ˈfɛ.ðɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Feature
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FEE-ch’r/ – /ˈfiː.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Featured
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but (often) stopped

– /FEE-ch’r-[d]/– /ˈfiː.tʃɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Features
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /FEE-ch’r-z/– /ˈfiː.tʃɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

February
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “u” is long, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like
the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FEH-broo-ayr-ee//ˈfɛ.bɹu.eɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Federal
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FEH[D]-rəl//ˈfɛ[ɾ].ɹəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fee
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/fee//fiː/

Feed
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/fee[d]//ˈfiː[ɾ]/

Feedback (Feed-back)
– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, the “a” is short, and the “ck” ending is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) – However, at the end of the word is (often) stopped

/FEE[D]-bæk//ˈfiː[ɾ].bæk/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Feel
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/feel//ˈfiːl/

Feeling
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FEE-ling//ˈfiː.lɪŋ/– Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Feet
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/fee[t]//ˈfiː[t]/

Fellow
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation)

/FEH-loh//ˈfɛ.lo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Felon
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “o” turns into a u-schwa

/FEH-luhn/ – /ˈfɛ.lə(ʌ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Felony
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/FEH-luh-nee/ – /ˈfɛ.lə(ʌ).niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Felt
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/fehl-[t]/ – /fɛl.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Female
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/FEE-mayl//ˈfiː.meɪl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Feminine
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/FEH-mih-nihn//ˈfɛ.mə(ɪ).nə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Fence
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/FEHN-s//fɛn.s/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable

Ferry
 – For this word, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/FAYR-ee//ˈfeɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Fertile
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, and for the “-ile” suffix – the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is the product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/F’R-tai-yl/ – /ˈfɚ.taiː.jl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Fertility
 – For this word, the “e” disappears, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/f’r-TIH-lih-dee/ – /fɚ.ˈtɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Fervent
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /F’R-vihn[t]//ˈfɚ.və(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Fervently
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /F’R-vihn[t]-lee//ˈfɚ.və(ɪ)n[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Festival
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FEH-stih-vəl//ˈfɛ.stə(ɪ).vəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fetch
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/feh-ch//fɛ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

Fever
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, and the second “e” disappears

– /FEE-v’r//ˈfiː.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Feverish
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, and the second “e” disappears, and for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /FEE-v’r-ish//ˈfiː.vɚ.ə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Few
 – For this word, the “ew” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”

/fyoo//fju/

Fewer
 – For this word, the “ew” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FYOU-‘r/ – /ˈfju.ɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Fewest
 – For this word, the “ew” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “w” and the second “e” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FYOU-wihs-[t]/ – /ˈfju.wə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Fi

Fidelity
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /fih-DEH-lih-dee//fə(ɪ).ˈdɛ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Fidgeting
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “dg” combination is pronounced simply like the single soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FIH-dʒih-ding//ˈfɪ.dʒə(ɪ).ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Field
 – For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

/feel-[d]//fiːl.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Fifteen
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and for the “teen” suffix – the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/fihf-TEEN//fɪf.ˈtiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Fifth
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the second “f” almost disappears, and the “th” is un-voiced

– /fihf-th/ – /fɪf.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable

Fifty
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/FIHF-tee//ˈfɪf.tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fifty-Five
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/fihf-tee-FAIV//fɪf.tiː.ˈfaiːv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Fifty-Two
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”

/fihf-tee-TOO//fɪf.tiː.ˈtu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Fight
 – For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “night” or “right” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/figh[t]//fʌiː[t]/

Fighter
 – For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word, “night” or “right”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FIGH-der//ˈfʌiː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fighting
 – For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “night” or “right” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/figh-ding//fʌiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Figure
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “g” is hard, the “u” like the consonant letter “y”, and the “e” disappears

/FIHG-y’r//ˈfɪg.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Figures
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “g” is hard, the “u” like the consonant letter “y”, the “e” disappears, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /FIHG-y’rz//ˈfɪg.jɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

File
 – For this word, and for the “-ile” combination – the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is the product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /FAI-yl//ˈfaiː.jl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Filipino
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second  “i” is a true-schwa, the third “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “o” is long

/fih-lə-PEE-noh//fə(ɪ).lə.ˈpiː.no/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Filing
 – For this word, the first “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /FAI-yl-ing//ˈfaiː.jl.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fill
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/fihl//fɪl/

Film
 – For this word, the “i” is short

/fihlm//fɪlm/

Final
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FAI-nəl//ˈfaiː.nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Finally
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FAIN-lee//ˈfaiːn.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Finance
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” is short, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /FAI-næns//ˈfaiː.næns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Finances
 – For this word, the “i” is long, for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” is short, the “c” is soft, and since the word is plural – the “e” merges with the “-es” ending and turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /FAI-næn-sihz//ˈfaiː.næn.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Financial
 – For this word, the first “i” is long, the first “a” is short, and for the “-cial” suffix – the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /fai-NæN-shəl//faiː.ˈnæn.ʃəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Financier
 – For this word, the first “i” is long, the “a” is short, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it)

/fai-næn-see-AYR/ – /faiː.næn.siː.eɪɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fourth syllable –

Financing
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “a” is short, the “c” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /FAI-næn-sing/ – /ˈfaiː.næn.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Find
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/fain-[d]//faiːn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Fine
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/fain//faiːn/

Fined
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/fain-[d]//faiːn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Finely
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /FAIN-lee//ˈfaiːn.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Finger
 – For this word, the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination, the “g” is hard, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FING-g’r//ˈfɪŋ.gɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Finish
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /FIH-nihsh//ˈfɪ.nɪʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Finished
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the “sh” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

– /FIH-nihsh-t//ˈfɪ.nɪʃ.t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Finishes
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, and for the “-es” ending – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /FIH-nih-shihz//ˈfɪ.nɪ.ʃə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Finland
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/FIHN-lihn-[d]/ – /ˈfɪn.lə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Finn
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/fihn//fɪn/

Fire
 – For this word, and for the “-ire” combination – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/FIGH-yr//ˈfʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fireworks
 – For this word, for the “-ire” combination – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this lettr combination in The Common Tongue), and the “o” disappears

/FIGH-y’r-w’r-ks//ˈfʌiː.jɚ.wɚ.ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Firm
 – For this word, the “i” disappears

– /f’rm//fɚm/

Firmly
 – For this word, the “i” disappears, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/F’RM-lee//ˈfɚm.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Firms
 – For this word, the “i” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /f’rm-z/ – /fɚm.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

First
 – For this word, the “i” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /f’r-s[t]//fɚ.s[t]/ – Notice also that the “st” ending (even when the “t” is stopped) acts as a second syllable

Firstly
 – For this word, the “i” disappears, the “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /F’R-s[t]-lee//ˈfɚ.s[t].liː/ – Notice also that the “st” ending (even when the “t” is stopped) acts as a second syllable

Fish
 – For this word, the “i” is short

/fihsh//fɪʃ/

Fishing
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FIH-shing//ˈfɪ.ʃɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fit
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/fih[t]//fɪ[t]/

Five
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the final “e”

– /faiv/ – /faiv/ –

Fix
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/fih-ks//fɪ.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable

Fixed
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and since the root-word ends with the letter “x” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/FIH-ks-t/ – /ˈfɪ.ks.t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fist syllable and that the “x” and the “t” ending act as a second and third syllable –

Fixture
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “x” is pronounced as the “ks” combination, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FIH-ks-ch’r//ˈfɪ.ks.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ks” sound acts as a separate syllable

Fl

Flabbergasted
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “bb” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “b”, the “e” disappears, the “g” is hard, the second “a” is short, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /FLæ-b’r-gæs-tih[d]//ˈflæ.bɚ.gæ.stə(ɪ)d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Flag
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “g” is hard

/flæg//flæg/

Flame
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/flaym//fleiːm/

Flare
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/flayr//fleɪɹ/

Flared
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/flayr-[d]//fleɪɹ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Flash
 – For this word, the “a” is short

/flæsh//flæʃ/

Flat
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/flæ[t]//flæ[t]/

Flatland (Flat-Land)
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the second “a” is short

/FLæ[T]-lænd//ˈflæ[t].lænd/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Flavor
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “o” disappears

/FLAY-v’r//ˈfleiː.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Flaw
 – For this word, the “aw” combination is pronounced as in the word “law” or “saw” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/flaw/ – /flɔ/ –

Flawed
 – For this word, the “aw” combination is pronounced as in the word “law” or “saw” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “w” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/flaw[d]/ – /flɔ[ɾ]/ –

Flaws
 – For this word, the “aw” combination is pronounced as in the word “law” or “saw” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced (almost) like the letter “z”

/flaw-z/ – /fl.ɔ.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a separate syllable

Fleeting
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FLEE-ding//ˈfliː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Flesh
 – For this word, the “e” is short

/flehsh//flɛʃ/

Flex
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue)

/fle-ks//flɛ.ks/

Flexibility (Flex-Ability)
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/flek-sih-BIH-lih-dee//flɛk.sə(ɪ).ˈbə(ɪ).lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Flexible (Flex-able)
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ible” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-
schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FLEHK-sih-bəl//flɛk.sə(ɪ).ˈbəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Flight
 – For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “night”, or “sight” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /fligh[t]//flʌiː[t]/

Float
 – For this word, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/floh[t]//flo[t]/

Flood
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the short letter “u” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/fluh[d]//flʌ[d]/

Floods
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the short letter “u” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /flu-dz//flʌ.dz/ – Notice also that the “dz” ending acts as a second syllable

Floor
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/flohr//flor/

Flop
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “p” is (usually) stopped

/flah[p]//flɑ[p]/

Florist
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /FLOHR-ih-st//ˈfloɹ.ə(ɪ).s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a third syllable

Flounder
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /FLOWN-d’r//ˈflaun.dɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Flour
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “u” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)

/FLOW-wr//ˈflɑu.wɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Flow
 – For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”)

/floh//flo/

Flower
 – For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “now” or “how” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom “w” in-between the “w” and the “e”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FLOW-wr//ˈflau.wɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Flu
 – For this word, the “u” is long

/floo//flu/

Fluctuate
 – For this word, the first “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the second “u” is long, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/FLUH[K]-choo-ay[t]/ – /ˈflʌ[k].tʃu.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Fluctuated
 – For this word, the first “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the second “u” is long,, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

/FLUH[K]-choo-ay-dih[d]/ – /ˈflʌ[k].tʃu.e.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Fluctuating
 – For this word, the first “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FLUH[K]-choo-ay-ding/ – /ˈflʌ[k].tʃu.e.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Fluency
 – For this word, the “u” is long letter “u”, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “u” and the “e” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the  “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /FLOO-ihn-see//ˈflu.ə(ɪ)n.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fluent
 – For this word, the “u” is long, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “u” and the “e” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /FLOO-ihn-[t]//ˈflu.ə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Fluently
 – For this word, the “u” is long, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “u” and the “e” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /FLOO-ihn-[t]-lee//ˈflu.ə(ɪ)n.[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the letter “t” (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable –

Fly
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/flai//flaiː/

Flying
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “y” and the “i” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FLAI-ying//ˈflaiː.jɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fo

Focus
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “c” is hard, and the “u” turns into an i-schwa

– /FOH-kihs//ˈfo.kə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Focused
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “c” is hard, the “u” turns into an i-schwa, and because the root-word ends with the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /FOH-kihs-[t]//ˈfo.kə(ʌ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Focusing
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “c” is hard, the “u” turns into an i-schwa, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FOH-kih-sing//ˈfo.kə(ɪ).sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Foe
– For this word, the “oe” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”

/foh//fo/

Fog
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “g” is hard

– /faw-g//fɔ.g/ – Notice also that the “g” ending acts as a second syllable

Foggy
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “g”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /FAW-gee//ˈfɔ.giː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Fold
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/fohl-[d]//fol.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Folding
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the final “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the
standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FOHL-ding//ˈfol.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Foliage
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e” but the is spoken so quickly that it almost sounds like the consonant letter “y”, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FOH-lee-ihdʒ/ – /ˈfo.liː.ə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Folk
 – For this word, for this word, the “o” is long, and the “l” is almost silent

/foh[l]k//fo[l]k/ –

Follow
 – For this word, the first “o” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” is long, and the “w” is silent

– /FAH-loh//ˈfɑ.lo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Following
 – For this word, the first “o” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /FAH-lə-wing//ˈfɑ.lə.wɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Food
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/foo[d]//fu[ɾ]/

Foot
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced as a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (like in the word “book” or “put”), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/fəih[t]//fəɪ[t]/

Football
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced as a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (like in the word “book” or “put”), the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/FəIH[T]-bawl//ˈfəɪ[t].bɔl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

For
 – For this word, the “o” is long

/fohr//for/

Forbes
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “b” is almost stopped, the “e” is silent, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /fohr-bz/ – /foɹ.bz/ – Notice also that the “bz” ending acts as a second syllable

Force
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/fohr-s//foɹ.s/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable

Forced
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “c” is soft, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /fohr-s[t]//foɹ.s[t]/ – Notice also that the “st” ending ( even when the “t” is stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Forecast (fore-Cast)
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “e” is silent, the “c” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/FOHR-kæs[t]//ˈfoɹ.kæs[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Foreclosure (fore-Closure)
– For this word, the first “o” is long, the “e” is silent, the “c” is hard, the second “o” is long, and for the “-sure” suffix – the “s” is pronounced like voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/fohr-KLOH-zh’r/ – /foɹ.ˈklo.ʒɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Foreign
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “ei” combination turns into an i-schwa, and the “g” is silent

/FOHR-ihn//ˈfoɹ.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Foreigners
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “ei” combination turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is silent, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/FOHR-ihn-’rz//ˈfoɹ.ə(ɪ).nɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Foreshadowing (fore-Shadow-ing)
– For this word, the first “o” is long, the “e” is silent, the “a” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the second “o” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FOHR-shæ-doh-wing//ˈfoɹ.ʃæ.ɾo.wɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Forest
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/FOHR-ih-s[t]//ˈfoɹ.ə(ɪ).s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “st” ending (when the “t” is not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Forever (for-Ever)
– For this word, the “o” disappears, the first “e” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/f’r-EH-v’r//fɚ.ˈɛ.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Forget
 – For this word, the “o” disappears, the “g” is hard, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/f’r-GIH[T]/ – /fɚ.ˈgə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Forgive
 – For this word, the “o” disappears, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/f’r-GIHV//fɚ.ˈgɪv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Fork
 – For this word, the “o” is long

/fohr-k//foɹ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Form
 – For this word, the “o” is long

/fohr-m//foɹ.m/ – Notice also that the “m” ending acts as a second syllable

Formal
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FOHR-məl//ˈfoɹ.məl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Formation
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” combination – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/fohr-MAY-shihn//foɹ.ˈmeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Formed
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and since the root-word ends with the letter “m” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/fohrm-d/ – /foɹm.d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable –

Former
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FOHR-m’r//ˈfoɹ.mɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Formerly
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/FOHR-m’r-lee//ˈfoɹ.mɚ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Formula
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/FOHR-myoo-luh//ˈfoɹ.mju,lə(ʌ)/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fort
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/fohr[t]//foɹ[t]/ – 

Fortunate
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FOHR-chə-nih[t]/ – /ˈfoɹ.tʃə.nə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Fortunately
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” turns into an i-schwa, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, the “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /FOHR-chihn-ih[t]-lee/ – /ˈfoɹ.tʃə(ɪ)n.ə(ɪ)[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fortune
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” turns into a i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/FOHR-chihn//ˈfoɹ.tʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Fortunes
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” turns into a i-schwa, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/FOHR-chihnz//ˈfoɹ.tʃə(ɪ)nz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Forty
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/FOHR-dee//ˈfoɹ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Forty-Five
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/fohr-dee-FAIV//foɹ.ɾiː.ˈfaiːv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Forward
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and for the “-ward” suffix, the “a” disappears, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FOHR-w’r[d]/ – /ˈfoɹ.wɚ[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Forwarded
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and for the “-ward” suffix, the “a” disappears, and the first “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/FOHR-w’r-dih[d]/ – /ˈfoɹ.wɚ.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Found
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/fown[d]//faun[d]/ – 

Foundation
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “a” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/fown-DAY-shihn//fɑun.ˈdeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Fountain
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the i-schwa

/FOWN-[t]-ihn//ˈfɑun.[t].ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Four
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”

/fohr//foɹ/

Fourteen
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, there is a guttural stop after in-between the “r” and the “t”, and for the “teen” suffix – the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/fohr’-TEEN//foɹʔ.ˈtiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Fourth
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, and the final “th” combination is un-voiced

/fohr-th//foɹ.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable

Fox
 – For this word, the “o” is short, and the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/fah-ks//fɑ.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable

Foxes
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced (almost) like the letter “z”

/FAHK-sihz//fɑk.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Foyer
 – For this word, the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “toy” or “boy (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “y” and the “e” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “er” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

/FOHY-yay//ˈfoiː.yeiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fr

Fracture
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/FRæK-ch’r//ˈfɹæk.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fractured
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/FRæK-ch’r-[d]//ˈfɹæk.tʃɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fragrance
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/FRAY-grihn-s//ˈfɹeiː.gɹə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a separate syllable –

Fragrances
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and since the word is plural – the “e” merges with the “-es” ending and turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/FRAY-grihn-sihz//ˈfɹeiː.gɹə(ɪ)n.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Frame
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/fraym//fɹeiːm/

Framed
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “m” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the “d” is (often) stopped

/fraym-[d]//fɹeiːm.[d]/

France
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/fræs/ – /fɹæns/ –

Frankfurt
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “t” is stopped

/FRæŋK-f’r[t]//ˈfɹæŋk.fɚ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Frankly
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/FRæNG-klee//ˈfɹæŋ.kliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Fraud
 – For this word, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/fraw[d]//fɹɔ[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

Fraudulent
 – For this word, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the final “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FRAH-dʒə-lihn-[t]//ˈfɹɔ.dʒə.lə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Freakonomics
 – For this name, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the first “o” turns into a u-schwa, the second “o” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/free-kə-NAH-mihks//fɹiː.kə(ʌ).ˈnɑ.mə(ɪ)ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Free
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/free//fɹiː/

Freedom
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “d” is a flap-d, the “o” turns into a true-schwa

/FREE-dəm//ˈfɹiː.ɾəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Freeing
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “e” and the “i” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/FREE-yihŋ//ˈfɹiː.jɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Freely
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/FREE-liː//ˈfɹiː.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Freeway
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ay” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/FREE-way//ˈfɹiː.weiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Freeze
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/freez//fɹiːz/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

French
 – For this word, the “e” is short

/frehn-ch/ – /fɹɛn.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable –

Frequent
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FREE-kwihn[t]//ˈfɹiː.kwə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Frequently
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/FREE-kwihn[t]-lee//ˈfɹiː.kwə(ɪ)n[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Frescoes
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “oe” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/FREHS-kohz//ˈfɹɛs.koz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fresh
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “sh” combination is un-voiced

/freh-sh//fɹɛ.ʃ/ – Notice also that the “sh” ending acts as a second syllable –

Freshly
  – For this word, the “e” is short, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/freh-shlee//ˈfɹɛ.ʃliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fret
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /freh-[t]//fɹɛ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Friday
  – For this word, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “ay” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/FRAI-day//ˈfɹaiː.ɾeiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fridge
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “dg” combination is pronounced simply as the single soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/frih-dʒ//fɹɪ.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable

Friend
  – For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/frehn-[d]//fɹɛn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Friendliness (Friend-ly-ness)
– For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “d” is (often) stopped, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FREHN[D]-lee-nihs//ˈfɹɛn[d].liː.nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Friendly
 – For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “d” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/FREHN[D]-lee//ˈfɹɛn[d].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Friends
 – For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the short letter “e” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “d” is (often) stopped, and the final “s” is pronounce almost like the letter “z”

/frehn-[d]z//fɹɛn.[d]z/ – Notice also that the “ds” ending acts as a second syllable

Friendship
 – For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the short letter “e” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “d” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ship” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/frehn-[d]-shih[p]//ˈfɹɛn.[d].ʃə(ɪ)[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fries
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “e” is silent, and the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/fraiz//fɹaiːz/

Fridge
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “dg” combination is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/frih-dʒ/ – /fɹɪ.dʒ/ – Notice also that the “dg” ending acts as a second syllalbe

Fright
 – For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounce like in the word “night” or “right” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/fright[t]//fɹʌiː[t]/

Frighten
 – For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounce like in the word “night” or “right” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FRIGH[T]-ihn//ˈfɹʌiː[t].ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Frightened
 – For this word,the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “night” or “right” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is (usually) stopped, for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends the sound of the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/FRIGH[T]-‘n-d//ˈfɹʌiːʔ.n.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Frightening
 – For this word, the “igh” combination is like in the word “night” or “fight” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is (usually) stopped, for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/FRIGH[T]-ning//ˈfɹʌiː[t].ə(ɪ).nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

From
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”

/fruhm//fɹʌm/

Front
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/fruhn-[t]//fɹʌn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Frozen
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FROH-zihn//ˈfɹo.zə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fruit
 – For this word, the “ui” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/froo[t]//fɹu[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Frustrated
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it),, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/FRUHS-chray-dih[d]//ˈfɹʌs.tʃɹe.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Frustrating
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is a TRUE Long, the “t” (usually) turns into a flap-d, and the “ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /FRUHS-chray-ding//ˈfɹʌs.tʃɹeiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Fry
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/frai//fɹaiː/

Fu

Fucked
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), However, because of the “ed” ending the “k” is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/fuh[k]-t//fʌ[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Fuel
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the “e” turns into a true-schwa

/FYOU-əl//ˈfju.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fueled
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/FYOU-əl-[d]//ˈfju.əl.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fugitive
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “g” is soft, the first “i” turns into a i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /FYOU-gih-dihv//ˈfju.dʒə(ɪ).ɾɪv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fulfill
 – For this word, the “u” turns into an true-schwa, the first  “l” almost disappears, the “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/fəl-FIHL/ – /fəl.ˈfɪl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Fulfilled
 – For this word, the “u” turns into an true-schwa, the first “l” almost disappears, the “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d, but is (often) stopped

/fəl-FIHL-[d]/ – /fəl.ˈfɪl.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Fulfilling
 – For this word, the “u” turns into an true-schwa, the first “l” almost disappears, the “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/fəl-FIHL-ing/ – /fəl.ˈfɪl.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Full
 – For this word, the “u” turns into an true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/fəl//fəl/

Fully
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

 – /-lee/ – /ˈfə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fun
 – For this word, the “u” is short

– /fuhn/ – /fʌn/ –

Function
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the hard “c” directly after it), the “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FUNG-k-shihn//ˈfʌŋ.k.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Functions
 – For this word, just remember that the “u” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the hard letter “c” directly after it), the “c” is hard, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/FUHŋ-kshihn-z//ˈfʌŋ.kʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Fund
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /fuhn[d]/ – /fʌn[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Funding
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /FUHN-ding/ – /ˈfʌn.dɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Fundamental
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is short, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/fuhn-duh-MEHN-təl//ˌfʌn.də(ʌ).ˈmɛn.təl/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Funeral
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “e” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FYOON-rəl//ˈfjun.ɹəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Funny
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounce simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final letter “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/FUH-nee//ˈfʌ.niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fur
 – For this word, the “u” disappears

/f’r//fɚ/

Furnish
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, and for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “sh” combination is un-voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/F’R-nihsh//ˈfɚ.nə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Furnished
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, and for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “sh” combination is un-voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the “sh” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (sometimes) stopped

/F’R-nihsh-[t]//ˈfɚ.nə(ɪ)ʃ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Furniture
 – For this word, the first “u” disappears, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/F’R-nih-ch’r//ˈfɚ.nə(ɪ).tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Further
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, the “th” combination is voiced, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/F’R-th’r//ˈfɚ.ðɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Furthermore (Further-More)
– For this word, the “u” disappears, the “th” combination is voiced, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/F’R-th’r-mohr//ˈfɚ.ðɚ.moɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fuschia
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “sch” combination is pronounced simply like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “ia” combination turns into a u-schwa

/FYOO-shuh//ˈfju.ʃə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Fusion
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FYOU-zhihn/ – /ˈfju.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Future
 – For this word, the first “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FYOU-ch’r//ˈfju.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Fuzzy
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “zz” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “z” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/FUH-zee//ˈfʌ.ziː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter F ) –


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