– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter G:  Gi ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue — a.k.a. — American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in The English Language, with more words added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of The English Language — both world-wide, and through-out America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Gi

 

Ga . Ge . Gl . Go . Gr . Gu . Gy

 

 

Giant
– For this word, the “G” is soft, the “i” is long, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/dʒAI-ihn-[t]//ˈdʒaiː.ə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the final “t” (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Giddiness (Giddy-ness)
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the first “i” is short, the “dd” combination turns into a flap-d (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GIH-dee-nihs//ˈgɪ.ɾiː.nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Gift
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/gihf-[t]//gɪf.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Gifted
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “i” is short, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

/GIHF-dih[d]//ˈgɪf.də(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Gigantic
– For this word, the “G” is soft, the “i” is long, the second “g” is hard, the “a” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒai-GæN-tihk//dʒaiː.ˈgæn.tə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Gimmick
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the first “i” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/GIH-mih-k//ˈgɪ.mə(ɪ).k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “k” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Gin
– For this word, the “G” is soft, and the “i” is short

/dʒihn//dʒɪn/

 

Giraffes
– For this word, the “G” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” is silent

/dʒih--fs//dʒə(ɪ).ˈɹæ.fs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “fs” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Girl
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “i” disappears, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “r” and the “l” (this is combination in The Common Tongue)

/G’R-əl//ˈgɚ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Girlfriend
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “i” disappears, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “r” and the “l” (this is combination in The Common Tongue), the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/G’R-əl-frehn-[d]//ˈgɚ.əl.frɛn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Girls
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “i” disappears, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “r” and the “l” (this is combination in The Common Tongue), and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/G’R-əlz//ˈgɚ.əlz/ – Notices also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Gist
– For this word, the “G” is soft, and the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/dʒih-s[t]//dʒɪ.s[t]/ – Notice also that the “st” ending acts as a second syllable and that the “st” ending (even when the “t” is stopped) acts as a separate syllable

 

Give
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “i” is short, and the final “e” is silent

/gihv//gɪv/

 

Given
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “i” is short, and the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/GIH-vihn//gɪ.və(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

– ( American English PronunciationLetter G ) –


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Aa . Bb . Cc . Dd . Ee . Ff . Gg . Hh . Ii . Jj . Kk . Ll . Mm . Nn . Oo . Pp . Qq . Rr . Ss . Tt . Uu . Vv . Ww . Xx . Yy . Zz
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