– American English Pronunciation–

– ( Letter G:  Gr ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Gr

 

Ga . Ge . Gi . Gl . Go . Gu . Gy

 

Grab
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “b” is (often) stopped

/græ[b]//gɹæ[b]/

Grade
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “d” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/gray[d]//gɹe[d]/

Gradual
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GRæ-dʒoo-uhl//ˈgɹæ.dʒu.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Gradually
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the first “a” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GRæ-dʒoo-uh-lee//ˈgɹæ.dʒu.ə(ʌ).liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Graduate (noun)
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GRæ-dʒoo-ih[t]//ˈgɹæ.dʒu.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Graduate (verb)
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GRæ-dʒoo-ay[t]//ˈgɹæ.dʒu.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Graduation
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “u” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/græ-dʒoo-WAY-shihn//gɹæ.dʒu.ˈweiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Graffiti
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/gruh-FEE-dee//gɹə(ʌ).ˈfiː.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Grain
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/grayn//gɹeiːn/

Gram
– For this word, the “G” is hard, and the “a” is short

/græm//gɹæm/

Grammar
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the first “a” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the second “a” disappears

/GRæ-m’r//ˈgɹæ.mɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Grammy
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/GRæ-mee//ˈgɹæ.miː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Grand
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/græn-[d]//gɹæn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Grandchild
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, the “d” is (usually) stopped, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one letter to the next), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/GRæN-[d]-chai-yəl-[d]//ˈgɹæn.[d].tʃaiː.jəl.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Granddaughter
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the first “a” is short, the “dd” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “d”, the “augh” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GRæN-daw-d’r//ˈgɹæn.dɔ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Grandfather
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the first “a” is short, the “d” is (usually) is stopped, the “th” combination is voiced, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GRæN-[d]-fah-th’r//ˈgɹæn.[d].fɑðɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Grandmother
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, the “d” is (usually) stopped, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “th” combination is voiced, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GRæN[D]-muh-th’r//ˈgɹæn[d].mʌðɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Grandparent
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the first “a” is short, the “d” is (usually) dropped, the second “a” is the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GRæN-[d]-payr-ihn[t]//ˈgɹæn.[d].əɪɹ.ə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth

Grandson
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, the “d” is (usually) stopped, and the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”

/GRæN-[d]-suhn//ˈgɹæn.[d].sʌn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Granite
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, the “i” an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/GRæ-nih[t]//ˈgɹæ.nɪ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Grant
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/græn-[t]//gɹæn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Grass
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s”

/græs//gɹæs/

Grateful
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GRAY[T]-fəl//ˈgɹe[t].fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Gratuity
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “u” is long, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “u” and the “i” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/gruh-TOO-ih-dee//gɹə(ʌ).ˈtu.wə(ɪ)ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Grave
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/grayv//gɹeiːv/

Graves
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/grayv-z//gɹeiːv.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

Graveyard
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “e” is silent, the “y” takes the consonant sound, the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/GRAYV-yahr-[d]//ˈgɹeiːv.jɑɹ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Great
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ea” is pronounced like the True Long “A”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/gray-[t]//gɹe.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Greatest
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ea” combination is pronounced like The True Long “A”, the first “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often)
stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GRAY-dihs-[t]//ˈgɹe.ɾə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Greatly
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ea” combination is pronounced like The True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/GRAY[T]-lee//ˈgɹe[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Greece
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/grees//gɹiːs/

Greed
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/gree[d]//ˈgɹiː[ɾ]/

Greedy
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/GREE-dee//ˈgɹiː.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Green
– For this word, the “G” is hard, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/green//gɹiːn/

Greenest
– For this word, the “G” is hard, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GREE-nihs-[t]//gɹiː.nə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

Gregarious
– For this word, “G” is hard, the “e” turns into a u-schwa, the second “g” is also hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/gruh-GAYR-ee-ihs//gɹə(ʌ).ˈgeɪɹ.iː.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Grenade
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “e” turns into a u-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/gruh-NAY[D]//gɹə(ʌ).ˈne[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Grey
– For this word, the “G” is hard, and the “ey” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/gray//gɹeiː/

Grim
– For this word, the “G” is hard, and the “i” is short

/grihm//gɹɪm/

Grime
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/graim//gɹaiːm/

Grind
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “i” is long, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/grain-[d]//gɹaiːn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Grinds
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “i” is long, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/grain-dz//gɹaiːn.ds/ – Notice also that the “ds” ending acts as a second syllable

Grocery
– For this word, there are two different pronunciations: In both versions, the “G” is hard, and the “o” is long – in the first version the “c” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination and the “e” disappears – In the second version the “c” is soft, the “e” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GROHSH-ree//ˈgɹoʃ.ɹiː/ – Or – /GROH-s’r-ee//ˈgɹo.sɚ.iː/ – Notice also that in both version, the stress is on the first syllable

Groom
– For this word, the “G” is hard, and the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/groom//gɹum/

Groomed
– For this word,the “G” is hard, and the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “m” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/groom-[d]//gɹum.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

Ground
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like an “ow” combination, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/grown-[d]//gɹaun.[d]/ – Notice also that the final “g” (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Group
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/groo[p]//gɹu[p]/

Grow
– For this word, the “G” is hard, and the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”

/groh//gɹo/

Growth
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “o” is long, the “w” is silent, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/groh-th//gɹo.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable

Grub
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “u” is short, and the final “b” is (often) stopped

/gruh[b]//gɹʌ[b]/ –

Grudge
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “u” is short, the “dg” combination is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/gruh-dʒ//gɹʌ.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable

Grudges
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “u” is short, the “dg” combination is pronounced like the single soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/GRUHdʒ-ihz//ˈgɹʌdʒ.ə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Grudgingly
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “u” is short, the “dg” combination is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/GUHdʒ-ing-lee//ˈgɹʌdʒ.ɪŋ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Grumpy
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “u” is short, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/GRUHM-pee//ˈgɹʌm.piː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter G ) –


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