– American English Pronunciation–

– (Letter G) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Gg

 

Ge . Gi . Gl . Go . Gr . Gu

 

G
 – The name of this letter is pronounced like the soft letter “g”, and the long letter “e”

– /dʒee//dʒiː/

Gadget
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, the “dg” combination is pronounced simply like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/-dʒih[t]//ˈgæ.dʒə(ɪ)[t]/ Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Gadgets
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, the “dg” combination is pronounced simply like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/-dʒih-ts//ˈgæ.dʒə(ɪ).ts/ Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable –

Gain
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/gayn/ – /geiːn/ –

Gained
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/gayn-[d]/ – /geiːn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable –

Gaining
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/gay-ning/ – /geiː.nɪŋ/ –

Galactic
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is short, the first “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/guh-Læ[k]-tih[k]//gə(ʌ).ˈlæ[k].tə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Gallon
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/-lihn/ – /ˈgæ.lə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Gamble
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/Gæm-bəl//ˈgæm.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Gambling
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GæM-bə-ling/ – /ˈgæm.bə.lɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Game
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/gaym/ – /geiːm/ –

Gang
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, and the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/gæng//gæŋ/

Gap
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/gæ[p]/ – /gæ[p]/ –

Garage
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the second “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/gə-RAH-dʒ/ – /gə.ˈɹɑ.dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable –

Garages
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the second “g” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced (almost) like the letter “z”

/gə-RAH-dʒihz/ – /gə.ˈɹɑ.dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable –

Garbage
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GAHR-bih-dʒ/ – /ˈgɑɹ.bə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable –

Garbageman
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and third the “a” is short

– /GAHR-bih-dʒ-mæn//ˈgɑɹ.bə(ɪ).dʒ.mæn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Garden
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GAHR-dihn/ – /ˈgɑɹ.ɾə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Garlic
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GAHR-lih[k]//ˈgɑɹ.lə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Gas
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, and the “a” is short

/gæs/ – /gæs/ –

Gasoline
 – For this word, the “g” is hard, the “a” is short, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “e” is silent

/gæ-sə-LEEN/ – /gæ.sə.ˈliːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Gate
– For this word, the “G” is hard, and for the “-ate” ending – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped,
and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/gay[t]/ – /ge[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Gather
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, the “th” combination is voiced, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-th’r/ – /ˈgæ.ðɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Gathering
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, the “th” combination is voiced, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-th’r-ing//ˈgæ.ðɚ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Gauge
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “au” combination is pronounced like The True Long “A”, the second “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/gay-dʒ//ge.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” acts as a second syllable –

Gave
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/gayv//geiːv/

Ge

Gear
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/geer/ – /giːɹ/ –

Geared
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/geer-[d]/ – /giːɹ.[ɾ]/ –

Geese
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “e” is silent

/gees//giːs/

Gender
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, the first “e” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒEHN-d’r//ˈdʒɛn.dɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

General
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dʒEHN-rəl//ˈdʒɛn.ɹəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Generalization
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears,  for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dʒehn-rəl-ai-ZAY-shihn//dʒɛn.ɹəl.aiː.ˈzeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Generalize
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dʒEHN-rəl-aiz//ˈdʒɛn.ɹəl.aiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Generally
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /dʒEHN-rə-lee//ˈdʒɛn.ɹə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Generate
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒEH-n’r-ay[t]/ – /ˈdʒɛ.nɚ.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Generation
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappearsthe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒeh-n’r-AY-shihn/ – /dʒɛ.nɚ.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Generator
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappearsthe “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒEH-n’r-AY-d’r/ – /ˈdʒɛ.nɚ.e.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Generous
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒEH-n’r-ihs/ – /ˈdʒɛ.nɚ.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Geneva
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, the first “e” turns into an true-schwa, the second “e” is long, and the “a” turns into a u-schwa

– /dʒə-NEE-vuh//dʒə.ˈniː.və(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Genie
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, the first “e” is long, and the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/dʒEE-nee//ˈdʒiː.niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Genre
 – For this word, the “G” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, the first “e” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “e” turns into a u-schwa

/ZHAHN-ruh//ˈʒɑn.ɹə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Gentle
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, the “e” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “t” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/dʒEHN-təl/ – /ˈdʒɛn.təl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Gentleman
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, the first “e” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “t” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is silent, and for the “-man” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒEHN-təl-mihn//ˈdʒɛn.təl.mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Gently
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, the “e” is short, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/dʒEHN-[t]-lee//ˈdʒɛn.[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Genuine
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, the first “e” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/dʒEHN-yoo-ihn//ˈdʒɛn.ju.ə(ɪ)n / – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Geodesic
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, the “e” is long, the “o” is long, the second “e” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒee-oh-DEH-sih[k]/ – /dʒiː.o.ˈdɛ.sə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Geography
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, the “e” is long, the “o” is short, the second “g” is hard, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/dʒee-AH-gruh-fee//dʒiː.ˈɑ.gɹə(ʌ).fiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Geological
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, the “e” is long, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is short, the second “g” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒee-ə-LAH-dʒih-kəl//ˌdʒiː.ə.ˈlɑ.dʒə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Geology
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, the “e” is long, for the “-ology” suffix – the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is short, the “g” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒee-AH-lə-dʒee//dʒiː.ˈɑ.lədʒiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

German
 – For this word the “G” is soft, the “e” disappears, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

– /dʒ’R-mihn//ˈdʒɚ.mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Germany
 – For this word the “G” is soft, the “e” disappears, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /dʒ’R-mih-nee//ˈdʒɚ.mə(ɪ).niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Gerund
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, the “u” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/dʒAYR-ihn-[d]//ˈdʒeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Gesture
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, the “e” is short, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒEHS-ch’r/ – /ˈdʒɛs.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Gestures
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, the “e” is short, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/dʒEHS-ch’r-z/ – /ˈdʒɛs.tʃɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Get
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /geh[t]/ – /gɛ[t]/ – Notice also that –

Gi

Giant
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, the “i” is long, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/dʒAI-ihn-[t]//ˈdʒaiː.ə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the final “t” (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Giddiness (Giddy-ness)
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the first “i” is short, the “dd” combination turns into a flap-d (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /GIH-dee-nihs//ˈgɪ.ɾiː.nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Gift
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/gihf-[t]//gɪf.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Gifted
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “i” is short, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

/GIHF-dih[d]/ – /ˈgɪf.də(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Gigantic
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, the “i” is long, the second “g” is hard, the “a” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/dʒai-GæN-tihk//dʒaiː.ˈgæn.tə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Gimmick
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the first “i” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /GIH-mih-k//ˈgɪ.mə(ɪ).k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “k” ending acts as a third syllable

Gin
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, and the “i” is short

/dʒihn//dʒɪn/

Giraffes
– For this word, the “G” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” is silent

/dʒih--fs//dʒə(ɪ).ˈɹæ.fs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “fs” ending acts as a separate syllable –

Girl
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “i” disappears, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “r” and the “l” (this is  combination in The Common Tongue)

/G’R-əl//ˈgɚ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Girlfriend
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “i” disappears, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “r” and the “l” (this is  combination in The Common Tongue), the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/G’R-əl-frehn-[d]//ˈgɚ.əl.frɛn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Girls
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “i” disappears, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “r” and the “l” (this is  combination in The Common Tongue), and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /G’R-əlz/ – /ˈgɚ.əlz/ – Notices also that the stress is on the first syllable

Gist
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, and the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/dʒih-s[t]//dʒɪ.s[t]/ – Notice also that the “st” ending acts as a second syllable and that the “st” ending (even when the “t” is stopped) acts as a separate syllable –

Give
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “i” is short, and the final “e” is silent

/gihv//gɪv/

Given
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “i” is short, and the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/GIH-vihn//gɪ.və(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Gl

Glad
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d

/glæ//glæɾ/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts a second syllable

Glaringly
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/GAYR-ing-lee//gleɪɹ.ɪŋ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Glass
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/glæs//glæs/

Glasses
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced (almost) like the letter “z”

/GLæ-sihz//ˈglæ.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Glazed
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/glayz-[d]//gleiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Global
 – For this word, the “g” is hard, the “o” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /GLOH-b’l//glo.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Globalization
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “o” is long, for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /gloh-b’l-ai-ZAY-shihn//ˌglo.bəl.aiː.ˈzeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

Globalized
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “o” is long, for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/GLOH-bə-laiz-[d]//ˈglo.bə.laiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Gloomy
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue),

/GLU-mee//ˈglu.miː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Glove
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the final “e” is silent

/gluhv//glʌv/

Glue
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, and the “ue” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”

/gloo//glu/

Go

Go
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, and the “o” is long

/goh//go/

Goal
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, and the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/gohl//gol/

Goals
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, and the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/gohl-z//gol.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable –

God
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “o” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/gah[d]//gɑ[ɾ]/

Goes
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, and the “oe” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/goh-z//go.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a separate syllable

Gold
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “o” is long, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/gohl-[d]//gol.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Good
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “oo” combination tuns into a true-schwa (like in the word “foot” or “put”), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/gə[d]/ – /gə[ɾ]/ –

Goodbye
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “oo” combination tuns into a true-schwa (like in the word “foot” or “put”), and the “ye” combination is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/gə[d]-BAI//gə[ɾ].ˈbaiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Goods
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “oo” combination tuns into a true-schwa (like in the word “foot” or “put”), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/gə-dz//gə.dz/ – Notice also that the “dz” ending acts as a second syllable

Goose
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/goos//gus/

Gopher
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “o” is long, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” disappears

– /GOH-f’r//ˈgo.fɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Gorge
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “o” is long, the second “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/gohr-dʒ//ˈgoɹ.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable –

Gorgeous
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “o” is long, the second “g” is soft, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GOHR-dʒihs//ˈgoɹ.dʒə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Gorges
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “o” is long, the second “g” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/GOHR-dʒihz//ˈgoɹ.dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Gossip
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “o” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is and i-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

– /GAH-sih[p]//ˈgɑ.sə(ɪ)[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Gossiping
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “o” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is and i-schwa, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /GAH-sih-ping//ˈgɑ.sə(ɪ).pɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Got
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “o” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/gah[t]//gɑ[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

Govern
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and for the “-ern” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GUH-v’rn//ˈgʌ.vɚrn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Governance
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the  first “e” disappears, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GUH-v’r-nihn-s//ˈgʌ.vɚ.nə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Government
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, for the “-ern” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “n” is almost silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /GUH-v’r[n]-mən[t]//ˈgʌ.vɚr[n].mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Governments
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “o” sounds like the short letter “u”, for the “-ern” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “n” is almost silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa

– /GUH-v’r[n]-mihn-ts//ˈgʌ.vɚ[n].mə(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Governor
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, for the “-ern” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GUH-v’r-n’r//ˈgʌ.vɚ.nɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Gr

Grab
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “b” is (often) stopped

/græ[b]//gɹæ[b]/

Grade
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “d” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /gray[d]//gɹe[d]/

Gradual
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GRæ-dʒoo-uhl//ˈgɹæ.dʒu.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Gradually
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the first “a” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GRæ-dʒoo-uh-lee/ – /ˈgɹæ.dʒu.ə(ʌ).liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Graduate (noun)
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /GRæ-dʒoo-ih[t]/ – /ˈgɹæ.dʒu.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Graduate (verb)
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /GRæ-dʒoo-ay[t]/ – /ˈgɹæ.dʒu.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Graduation
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “u” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/græ-dʒoo-WAY-shihn//gɹæ.dʒu.ˈweiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Graffiti
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/gruh-FEE-dee//gɹə(ʌ).ˈfiː.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Grain
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/grayn//gɹeiːn/ –

Gram
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, and the “a” is short

/græm//gɹæm/

Grammar
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the first “a” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the second “a” disappears

/GRæ-m’r//ˈgɹæ.mɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Grammy
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /GRæ-mee//ˈgɹæ.miː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Grand
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/græn-[d]//gɹæn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Grandchild
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, the “d” is (usually) stopped, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one letter to the next), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/GRæN-[d]-chai-yəl-[d]//ˈgɹæn.[d].tʃaiː.jəl.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Granddaughter
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the first “a” is short, the “dd” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “d”, the “augh” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GRæN-daw-d’r//ˈgɹæn.dɔ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Grandfather
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the first “a” is short, the “d” is (usually) is stopped, the “th” combination is voiced, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GRæN-[d]-fah-th’r//ˈgɹæn.[d].fɑðɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Grandmother
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, the “d” is (usually) stopped, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “th” combination is voiced, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /GRæN[D]-muh-th’r//ˈgɹæn[d].mʌðɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Grandparent
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the first “a” is short, the “d” is (usually) dropped, the second “a” is the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GRæN-[d]-payr-ihn[t]//ˈgɹæn.[d].əɪɹ.ə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth –

Grandson
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, the “d” is (usually) stopped, and the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”

/GRæN-[d]-suhn//ˈgɹæn.[d].sʌn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Granite
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, the “i” an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/GRæ-nih[t]/ – /ˈgɹæ.nɪ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Grant
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/græn-[t]//gɹæn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Grass
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s”

/græs//gɹæs/

Grateful
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GRAY[T]-fəl//ˈgɹe[t].fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Gratuity
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “u” is long, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “u” and the “i” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/gruh-TOO-ih-dee//gɹə(ʌ).ˈtu.wə(ɪ)ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Grave
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/grayv//gɹeiːv/

Graves
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/grayv-z//gɹeiːv.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

Graveyard
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “e” is silent, the “y” takes the consonant sound, the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/GRAYV-yahr-[d]//ˈgɹeiːv.jɑɹ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Great
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ea” is pronounced like the True Long “A”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /gray-[t]//gɹe.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Greatest
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ea” combination is pronounced like The True Long “A”, the first “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often)
stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GRAY-dihs-[t]//ˈgɹe.ɾə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Greatly
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ea” combination is pronounced like The True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/GRAY[T]-lee//ˈgɹe[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Greece
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/grees//gɹiːs/

Greed
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/gree[d]//ˈgɹiː[ɾ]/

Greedy
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/GREE-dee//ˈgɹiː.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Green
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/green//gɹiːn/

Greenest
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GREE-nihs-[t]//gɹiː.nə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable –

Gregarious
 – For this word, “G” is hard, the “e” turns into a u-schwa, the second “g” is also hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /gruh-GAYR-ee-ihs//gɹə(ʌ).ˈgeɪɹ.iː.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Grenade
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “e” turns into a u-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/gruh-NAY[D]/ – /gɹə(ʌ).ˈne[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Grey
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, and the “ey” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/gray//gɹeiː/

Grim
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, and the “i” is short

/grihm//gɹɪm/

Grime
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/graim//gɹaiːm/

Grind
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “i” is long, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /grain-[d]//gɹaiːn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Grinds
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “i” is long, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /grain-dz//gɹaiːn.ds/ – Notice also that the “ds” ending acts as a second syllable –

Grocery
 – For this word, there are two different pronunciations: In both versions, the “G” is hard, and the “o” is long – in the first version the “c” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination and the “e” disappears – In the second version the “c” is soft, the “e” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /GROHSH-ree//ˈgɹoʃ.ɹiː/ – Or – /GROH-s’r-ee//ˈgɹo.sɚ.iː/ – Notice also that in both version, the stress is on the first syllable –

Groom
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, and the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/groom/ – /gɹum/ –

Groomed
– For this word,the “G” is hard, and the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “m” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/groom-[d]//gɹum.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

Ground
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like an “ow” combination, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/grown-[d]//gɹaun.[d]/ – Notice also that the final “g” (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Group
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/groo[p]//gɹu[p]/

Grow
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, and the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”

/groh//gɹo/

Growth
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “o” is long, the “w” is silent, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

– /groh-th//gɹo.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable –

Grub
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “u” is short, and the final “b” is (often) stopped

/gruh[b]/ – /gɹʌ[b]/ –

Grudge
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “u” is short, the “dg” combination is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/gruh-dʒ//gɹʌ.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable

Grudges
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “u” is short, the “dg” combination is pronounced like the single soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/GRUHdʒ-ihz/ – /ˈgɹʌdʒ.ə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Grudgingly
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “u” is short, the “dg” combination is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /GUHdʒ-ing-lee//ˈgɹʌdʒ.ɪŋ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Grumpy
– For this word, the “G” is hard, the “u” is short, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/GRUHM-pee//ˈgɹʌm.piː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Gu

Guarantee
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ua” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /gayr-ihn-TEE//geɪɹ.ə(ɪ)n.ˈtiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Guaranteed
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ua” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/gayr-ihn-TEE[D]/ – /ˌgeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)n.ˈtiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

Guard
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ua” combination is pronounced simply like the short letter “o”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/gahr-[d]//gɑɹ.[ɾ]/

Guardian
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ua” combination is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ian” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /GAHR-dee-ihn//ˈgɑɹ.ɾiː.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Guess
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/gehs//gɛs/

Guest
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ue” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /gehs-[t]//gɛs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Guests
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ue” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”

– /gehs-ts/ – /gɛs.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

Guidance
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ui” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i”, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /GAI-dihn-s/ – /ˈgaiː.ɾə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

Guide
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ui” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i”, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /gai-[d]//gaiː.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Guilty
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ui” combination is pronounced simply like the single shor letter “i”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /GIHL-tee//ˈgɪl.tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Guitar
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ui” combination turns into an i-schwa, and the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

– /gih-TAHR]//gə(ɪ).ˈtɑɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Guitarist
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the “ui” combination turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /gih-TAHR-ihs-[t]//gə(ɪ).ˈtɑɹ.ə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Gun
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, and the “u” is short

/guhn//gʌn/

Guttural
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, the first “u” is short, the “tt” combination (usually) turns into a flap-d (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “u” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/GUH-d’r-əl/ – /ˈgʌ.ɾɚ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Guy
 – For this word, the “G” is hard, and the “uy” combination is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/gai//gaiː/

Gym
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, and the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”

/dʒihm//dʒɪm/

Gymnasium
 – For this word, the “G” is soft, and the “y” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “u” is a u-schwa

/dʒihm-NAY-zee-uhm//dʒɪm.ˈneiː.ziː.ə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter G ) –


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