– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter H:  Ha ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Ha

 

He . Hi . Ho . Hr . Hu . Hy

 

H
– The word for the letter “H” is pronounced as the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “ch” combination

/aych//eiːtʃ/

 

Haberdashery
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “a” is short, the first “e” disappears, the second “a” is short, and for the “-ery” suffix the “e” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-b’r-dæ-sh’r-ee//ˈhæ.bɚ.ˌdæ.ʃɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Habit
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/-bih[t]//ˈhæ.bə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Habitat
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/-bih-tæ[t]//ˈhæ.bɪ.tæ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Habits
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, and the “i” turns into an i-schwa

/-bih-ts//ˈhæ.bə(ɪ).ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a thirds syllable

 

Hacker
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-k’r//hæ.kɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Hackers
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/-k’r-z//hæ.kɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Hacking
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-king//ˈhæ.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Had
– For this word the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/hæ[d]//hæ[ɾ]/

 

Haggle
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced like the single hard letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “gg” combination and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/-gəl//ˈhæ.gəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Hail
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and there is a phantom-schwa, in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)

/hay-əl//heɪ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Hair
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it)

/HAY-ər//heɪ.ɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Haircut
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “c” is hard, the “u” is a u-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/HAYR-kuh[t]//ˈheɪɹ.kə(ʌ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Hairdresser
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HAYR-dʒreh-s’r//heɪɹ.dʒɹɛ.sɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Haiti
– For the name of this country, the “H” is pronounced, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/HAY-dee//ˈhe.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Haitian
– For the name of this country, the “H” is pronounced, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphtong, the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the second “a” turns into an i-schwa

/HAY-shihn//ˈhe.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Half
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, and the “l” is silent

/hæf//hæf/

 

Hall
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/hawl//hɔl/

 

Halloween
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/hah-lə-WEEN//ˌhɑ.lə.ˈwiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Hammer
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply as the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-m’r//ˈhæ.mɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Hand
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/hæn-[d]//hæn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Handbag
– This compound word is pronounced as two separate words – the “H” is pronounced, the first “a” is short, the “d” is (often) stopped, the second “a” is short, and the final “g” is hard but is (often) stopped

/hæn-[d]-bæ[g]//hæn.[d].bæ[g]/ – Notice also that the “d” (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Handle
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “d” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/HæN-dəl//ˈhæn.dəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Handled
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “d” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “l”– the “e” is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/HæN-dəl-[d]//ˈhæn.dəl.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the flap-d ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Handsome
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “d” is stopped, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/HæN[D]-suhm//ˈhæn[d].sə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Hang
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, and the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination is The Common Tongue)

/hæng//hæŋ/

 

Happen
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply as the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-p’n//ˈhæ.p’n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Happened
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/-p’n-[d]//ˈhæ.p’n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Happiest
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p”, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-pee-ihs[t]//ˈhæ.piː.ə(ɪ)s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Happily
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ily” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-pih-lee//ˈhæ.pə(ɪ).liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Happiness
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-pee-nihs//ˈhæ.piːnə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Happy
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply as the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/-pee//ˈhæ.piː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Harangue
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is short, the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “ue” combination is silent

/huh-RæNG//hə(ʌ).ɹæŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Harangued
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is short, the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “u” is silent, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the “ng” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/huh-RæNG-d//hə(ʌ).ɹæŋ.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Harass
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is short, and the final the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/hə-RæS//hə.ˈɹæs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Harassment
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/hə-RæS-mihn-[t]//hə.ˈɹæs.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Harbor
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “o” disappears

/HAHR-b’r//ˈhɑɹ.bɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Hard
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/hahr-[d]//hɑɹ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the flap-d ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Hardly
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “d” is (usually) stopped, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/HAHR[D]-lee//ˈhɑɹ[d].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Hard-Working
– For this term, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the final “d” of the first word is (often) stopped – then, the “o” disappears, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/hahr[d]-W’R-king//hɑɹ[d]-ˈwɚ.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable of the second word –

 

Harsh
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “sh” combination is un-voiced

/hahr-sh//hɑɹ.sh/ – Notice also that the “sh” combination acts as a second syllable

 

Harm
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, and the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/hahrm//hɑɹm/

 

Harmful (Harm-full)
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and for the “-ful” suffix– the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HAHRM-fəl//hɑɹm.fəl/

 

Harmless (Harm-less)
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and for the “-less” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HAHRM-lihs//hɑɹm.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Harried
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r”, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/HAYR-ee[d]//ˈheɪɹ.iːɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Harshly
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HAHR-sh-lee//ˈhɑɹ.ʃ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “sh” combination acts as a separate syllable

 

Harvest
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is often stopped

/HAHR-vih-s[t]//ˈhɑɹ.və(ɪ).s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “st” ending (when the “t” is not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Has
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/hæz//hæz/

 

Haste
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/hays-[t]//heiːs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Hat
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/hæ-[t]//hæ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Hats
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short

/hæ-ts//hæ.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Hatchet
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “tch” is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/-chih-[t]//ˈhæ.tʃə(ɪ).[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Hate
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/hay-[t]//he.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Hatred
–For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/HAY-chrih-[d]//he.tʃɹə(ɪ).[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the flap-d ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Haunt
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “t” is often stopped

/hawn-[t]//hɔn.t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Haunted
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/HAWN-tih[d]//ˈhɔn.tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Have
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is a Short “A” / Short “U” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “v” directly behind it), and the final “e” is silent

/hæ(ʌ)v//hæ(ʌ)v/

 

Haven
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HAY-vihn//ˈheiː.və(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Haven’t
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” of the contracted “not” is (often) stopped

/-vihn-[t]//ˈhæ.və(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Havoc
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is Short “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “v” directly after it), the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final letter “c” is hard

/Hæ(ʌ)-vih-[k]//ˈhæ(ʌ).və(ɪ).[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Hazard
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” disappears, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/-z’r[d]//ˈhæ.zɚ[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter H ) –


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