– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter H ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Hh

 

He . Hi . Ho . Hr . Hu . Hy

 

H
 – The word for the letter “H” is pronounced as the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “ch” combination

– /aych/ – /eiːtʃ/ –

Haberdashery
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “a” is short, the first “e” disappears, the second “a” is short, and for the “-ery” suffix  the “e” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /-b’r-dæ-sh’r-ee//ˈhæ.bɚ.ˌdæ.ʃɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Habit
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/-bih[t]//ˈhæ.bə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Habitat
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/-bih-tæ[t]/ – /ˈhæ.bɪ.tæ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Habits
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, and the “i” turns into an i-schwa

– /-bih-ts//ˈhæ.bə(ɪ).ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a thirds syllable

Hacker
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-k’r/ – /hæ.kɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hackers
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/-k’r-z/ – /hæ.kɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Hacking
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /-king//ˈhæ.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Had
 – For this word the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /hæ[d]/ – /hæ[ɾ]/

Hail
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and there is a phantom-schwa, in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)

/hay-əl//heɪ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hair
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it)

/HAY-ər/ – /heɪ.ɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Haircut
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “c” is hard, the “u” is a u-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/HAYR-kuh[t]//ˈheɪɹ.kə(ʌ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Hairdresser
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HAYR-dʒreh-s’r/ – /heɪɹ.dʒɹɛ.sɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Haiti
 – For the name of this country, the “H” is pronounced, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /HAY-dee//ˈhe.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Haitian
 – For the name of this country, the “H” is pronounced, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphtong, the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the second “a” turns into an i-schwa

– /HAY-shihn//ˈhe.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Half
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, and the “l” is silent

– /hæf/ – /hæf/

Hall
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/hawl/ – /hɔl/ –

Halloween
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/hah-lə-WEEN//ˌhɑ.lə.ˈwiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Hammer
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply as the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-m’r/ – /ˈhæ.mɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hand
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/hæn-[d]/ – /hæn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Handbag
 – This compound word is pronounced as two separate words – the “H” is pronounced, the first “a” is short, the “d” is (often) stopped, the second “a” is short, and the final “g” is hard but is (often) stopped

/hæn-[d]-bæ[g]/ – /hæn.[d].bæ[g]/ – Notice also that the “d” (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Handle
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “d” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/HæN-dəl/ – /ˈhæn.dəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Handled
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “d” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “l”– the “e” is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/HæN-dəl-[d]/ – /ˈhæn.dəl.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the flap-d ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Handsome
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “d” is stopped, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/HæN[D]-suhm/ – /ˈhæn[d].sə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hang
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, and the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination is The Common Tongue)

/hæng/ – /hæŋ/ –

Happen
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply as the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-p’n/ – /ˈhæ.p’n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Happened
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/-p’n-[d]//ˈhæ.p’n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Happiest
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p”, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-pee-ihs[t]//ˈhæ.piː.ə(ɪ)s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Happily
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ily” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-pih-lee/ – /ˈhæ.pə(ɪ).liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Happiness
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-pee-nihs//ˈhæ.piːnə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Happy
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply as the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/-pee/ – /ˈhæ.piː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Harangue
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is short, the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “ue” combination is silent

/huh-RæNG/ – /hə(ʌ).ɹæŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Harangued
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is short, the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “u” is silent, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the “ng” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/huh-RæNG-d/ – /hə(ʌ).ɹæŋ.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Harass
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is short, and the final the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /hə-RæS//hə.ˈɹæs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Harassment
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /hə-RæS-mihn-[t]//hə.ˈɹæs.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Harbor
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “o” disappears

/HAHR-b’r//ˈhɑɹ.bɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Hard
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/hahr-[d]/ – /hɑɹ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the flap-d ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Hardly
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “d” is (usually) stopped, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/HAHR[D]-lee/ – /ˈhɑɹ[d].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hard-Working
 – For this term, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the final “d” of the first word is (often) stopped – then, the “o” disappears, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/hahr[d]-W’R-king//hɑɹ[d]-ˈwɚ.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable of the second word –

Harsh
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “sh” combination is un-voiced

/hahr-sh//hɑɹ.sh/ – Notice also that the “sh” combination acts as a second syllable –

Harm
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, and the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/hahrm/ – /hɑɹm/ –

Harmful (Harm-full)
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and for the “-ful” suffix– the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HAHRM-fəl/ – /hɑɹm.fəl/ –

Harmless (Harm-less)
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and for the “-less” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HAHRM-lihs//hɑɹm.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Harried
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r”, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/HAYR-ee[d]//ˈheɪɹ.iːɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Harvest
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is often stopped

/HAHR-vih-s[t]//ˈhɑɹ.və(ɪ).s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “st” ending (when the “t” is not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Has
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/hæz//hæz/

Haste
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /hays-[t]//heiːs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Hat
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/hæ-[t]/ – /hæ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Hats
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short

/hæ-ts/ – /hæ.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable –

Hatchet
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “tch” is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/-chih-[t]//ˈhæ.tʃə(ɪ).[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Hate
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/hay-[t]/ – /he.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Hatred
 –For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/HAY-chrih-[d]/ – /he.tʃɹə(ɪ).[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the flap-d ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Haunt
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “t” is often stopped

/hawn-[t]//hɔn.t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Haunted
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/HAWN-tih[d]//ˈhɔn.tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Have
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is a Short “A” / Short “U” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “v” directly behind it), and the final “e” is silent

– /hæ(ʌ)v//hæ(ʌ)v/ –

Haven
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HAY-vihn//ˈheiː.və(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Haven’t
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” of the contracted “not” is (often) stopped

– /-vihn-[t]//ˈhæ.və(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Havoc
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is Short “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “v” directly after it), the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final letter “c” is hard

– /Hæ(ʌ)-vih-[k]//ˈhæ(ʌ).və(ɪ).[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

He

He
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, and the “e” is long

– /hee/ – /hiː/ – 

Head
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /heh[d]//hɛ[ɾ]/

Headache (Head-Ache)
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /HEHD-ay-[k]//ˈhɛɾ.e.[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Headaches (Head-Ache-s)
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, and the “e” is silent

/HEHD-ay-ks/ – /ˈhɛɾ.e.ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a third syllable –

Headhunter (Head-Hunter)
– For this word, the first “H” is pronounced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, the second “h” is pronounced, the “u” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HEH[D]-huhn-t’r/ – /ˈhɛ[ɾ].hʌn.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Headlines
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the “i” is long, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /HEH[D]-lain-z//ˈhɛ[d].laiːn.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Headquarters
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination, the “a” is pronounced like the long letter “o”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /HEH[D]-kwohr-d’r-z//ˈhɛ[d].kwoɹ.ɾɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Heal
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “e” is long, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

/HEE-əl//ˈhiː.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Heals
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “e” is long, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/heel-z//hiːl.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

Health
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/hehl-th//hɛl.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable

Healthier
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HEHL-thee-‘r/ – /ˈhɛl.θiː.ɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Healthily
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the short letter “e”, the “th” combination is un-voiced, and for the “-ily” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /HEHL-thih-lee//ˈhɛl.θə(ɪ).liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Healthy
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “th” combination is un-voiced, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/HEHL-thee//ˈhɛl.θiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Hear
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “e” is long, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is a product of transitioning from the “e” to the “r” sound)

– /hee-ər//hiː.ɚ/

Hearing
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “e” is long, the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is a product of transitioning from the “e” to the “r” sound), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the
standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HEEər-ing//ˈhiːɚ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Heart
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

– /hahr[t]//hɑɹ[t]/

Hearty
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/HAHR-dee//ˈhɑɹ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Heat
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/hee[t]//hiː[t]/

Heater
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HEE-d’r//ˈhiː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Heating
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HEE-ding//ˈhiː.ɾɪŋ/– Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Heaven
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HEH-vihn//ˈhɛ.və(ɪ)n/– Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Heavily
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and for the “-ily” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /HEH-vih-lee//ˈhɛ.və(ɪ).liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Heavy
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /HEH-vee//ˈhɛ.viː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hectic
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “e” is short, the first “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /HEH[K]-tih[k]//ˈhɛ[k].tə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hedging
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “e” is short, the “dg” combination is pronounced simply like the single soft letter “g”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HEH-dʒing//ˈhɛ.dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Heel
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is s phantom consonant lettr “y” in-between the “ee” combination and the “l” (this is a product of transitioning from one sound to the next)

/HEE-yl//ˈhiː.jl/– Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Height
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “eigh” combination is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the “t” is (often) stopped

/high[t]//hʌiː[t]/

Heights
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “eigh” combination is pronounced like the “igh” combination

/high-ts/ – /hʌiː.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable –

Helicopter
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounce, the “e” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “o” is short, the “p” is almost stopped, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HEH-lih-kah[p]-t’r//ˈhɛ.lə(ɪ).kɑ[p].tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Hell
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “e” is short, and the “ll” combination  is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/hehl//hɛl/

Hello
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “e” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “o” is long

/HEHLOH//ˈhɛ.ˈlo/– Notice also that the stress can be on either syllable (but not on both, simply one or the other) –

Helmet
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/HEHL-mih[t]//ˈhɛl.mə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Helmets
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “e” is short, and the second “e” turns into an i-schwa

/HEHL-mih-ts//ˈhɛl.mə(ɪ).ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

Help
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “e” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

– /hehl-[p]//hɛl.[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Helped
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “e” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “p” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/hehl[p]-t/ – /hɛl[p].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts a second syllable –

Helpful (Help-full)
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, and the “e” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into an true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /HEHL[P]-fəl//ˈhɛl[p].fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Helpfulness (Help-full-ness)
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “e” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped, for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into an true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HEHL[P]-fəl-nihs//ˈhɛl[p].fəl.nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hemisphere
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “e” is short, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/HEH-mihs-feer/ – /ˈhɛ.mə(ɪ)s.fiːɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hence
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “e” is short, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/hehn-s//hɛn.s/ – Notice also that the soft “c” ending act as a second syllable

Her
 – For this word, the “h” is pronounced, and the “e” disappears

– /h’r/ – /hɚ/ –

Herald
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “d” is (usually) stopped

/HAYR-əl[d]/ – /heɪɹ.əl[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Herd
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “e” disappears, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/h’r[d]/ – /hɚ[d]/ –

Here
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “e” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/HEE-yr//ˈhiː.jɚ/– Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Hernia
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “e” disappears, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/H’R-nee-uh//ˈhɚ.nee.ə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hero
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “e” is long, and the “o” is long

/HEE-roh/ – /ˈhiː.ɹo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Heroic
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is long, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /hih-ROH-ih[k]//hə(ɪ).ɹo.ə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Heroine
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” is long, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/HAYR-oh-ihn//ˈheɪɹ.o.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hers
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “e” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/H’R-z//ˈhɚ.z/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable

Herself (her-Self)
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “e” disappears, and the second “e” is short

/h’r-SEHL-f//hɚ.ˈsɛl.f/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “f” ending acts as a third syllable

Hesitant
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “e” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HEH-zih-tihn[t]//ˈhɛ.zə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as fourth syllable

Hesitate
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “e” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HEH-zih-tay[t]//ˈhɛ.zə(ɪ).te[iː][t]/– Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Hi

Hi
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, and the “i” is long

/hai//haiː/

Hibernate
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HIGH-b’r-nay[t]//ˈhʌiː.bɚ.ne[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hidden
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “i” is short, the “dd” combination is pronounced like a single flap-d (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HIH-dihn/ – /ˈhɪ.ɾə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hide
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/hai[d]//haiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Hiding
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HAI-ding//ˈhaiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hierarchical
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “e” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “ch” combination is pronounced like the letter “k”,, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /high-yr-AHR-kih-kəl/ – /hʌiː.jɚ.ˈɑɹ.kə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Hierarchy
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “e” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/HIGH-yr-ahr-kee//ˈhʌiː.jɚ.ɑɹ.kiː/ – Notice that the stress is on the first syllable –

High
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, and the “igh” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/hai/ – /haiː/ –

High-School
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “fight” or “night” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination), then the “ch” combination is pronounced like the letter “k”, and the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/HIGH-skool//ˈhʌiː.skul/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

High-Tech
– This term is pronounced like two separate words.  For the first, the “H” is pronounced, the “igh” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue).  For the second word, the “e” is short, and the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”

/hai-TEH-k//haiː.ˈtɛ.k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Higher
 – For this word the “H” is pronounced, the “igh” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “igh” combination and the “-er” suffix (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HAI-yr//ˈhaiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Highest
 – For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “igh” combination and the “-est” suffix (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HAI-yihs[t]//ˈhaiː.jə(ɪ)s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Highlight
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced”, the “igh” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “light” or “night” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tounge), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/HAI-ligh[t]//ˈhaiː.lʌiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Highly
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “igh” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/HAI-lee//ˈhaiː.liː/– Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Highway
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “igh” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/HAI-way//ˈhaiː.weiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Hijacked
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “i” is long, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g”, the “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced like the single letter “k” but virtually disappears (this is due to the “t” sound of the “-ed” ending), and the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/HAI-dʒæ[k].t//ˈhaiː.dʒæ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Hike
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “k” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/hihg-[k]//hʌiː.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Hiking
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HIGH-king//ˈhʌiː.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Hilarious
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/hih-LAYR-ee-ihs//hə(ɪ).ˈleɪɹ.iː.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Hill
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, this “i” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/hihl//hɪl/

Hillary
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/HIH-l’r-ee//ˈhɪ.lɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Him
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, and the “i” is short

/hihm//hɪm/

Himalayan
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is long, the “y” takes the consonant sound, and the third “a” turns into an i-schwa

/hih-muh-LAY-yihn//hə(ɪ).mə(ʌ).ˈleiː.jə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Himself (him-Self)
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “i” is short, and the “e” is short

/hihm-SEHL-f//hɪm.ˈsɛl.f/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “f” ending acts as a third syllable –

Hinder
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “i” is short, and the “e” disappears

/HIHN-d’r//ˈhɪn.dɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Hip
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “i” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/hih[p]//hɪ[p]/

Hippocampus
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, he “i” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “c” is hard, the “a” is short, and the “u” turns into an i-schwa

/hih-poh-KæM-pihs//ˌhɪ.po.ˈkæm.pə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Hire
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, and for the “-ire” combination – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/HIGH-yr//ˈhʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

His
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “i” is short, and the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/hihz//hɪz/

Historic
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is long, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/hihs-TOHR-ih[k]//hə(ɪ)s.ˈtoɹ.ə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Historical
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “o” is long, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/hihs-TOHR-ihkəl//hə(ɪ)s.ˈdoɹ.ə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

History
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “i” is short, the “t” is pronounced almost like the “ch” combination (this is because the “o” virtually disappears, making the “r” the next sound), the “o” virtually disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/HIHS-chree//ˈhɪs.tʃɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Hit
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/hih[t]//hɪ[t]/

Hitch
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “i” is short, the “tch” combination is pronounced simply as the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/hih-ch//ˈhɪ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable –

Hitches
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “i” is short, the “tch” combination is pronounced simply as the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/HIH-chihz//ˈhɪ.tʃə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Hits
 – For this word the “H” is pronounced, and the “i” is short

/hih-ts//hɪ.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable –

Ho

Hobbies
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “o” is short, the “bb” combination is pronounced simple like the single letter “b” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/HAH-beez//ˈhɑ.biːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hobby
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “o” is short, the “bb” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “b” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/HAH-bee//ˈhɑ.biː/– Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Hold
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “o” is long, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/hohl[d]//hol[d]/

Hole
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/hohl//hol/

Holiday
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “ay” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

– /HAH-lih-day//ˈhɑ.lə(ɪ).deiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Holidays
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “ay” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/HAH-lih-dayz/ – /ˈhɑ.lə(ɪ).deiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Holland
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “o” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /HAH-lihn[d]/ – /ˈhɑ.lə(ɪ)n[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hollow
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “o” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation)

/HAH-loh//ˈhɑ.lo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Holy
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “o” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/HOH-lee//ˈho.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Home
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/hohm//hom/

Homework
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “o” is long, the “e” is silent, and the second “o” disappears

/HOHM-w’rk//ˈhom.wɚk/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Honest
 – For this word, the “H” is silent (this is one of only a few words in The Common Tongue that has the silent “h”), the “o” is short, and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /AH-nihs-[t]//ˈɑ.nə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable  –

Honestly
 – For this word, the “H” is silent (this is one of only a few words in The Common Tongue that has the silent “h”), the “o” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/AH-nihs[t]-lee/ – /ˈɑ.nə(ɪ)s[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Honor
 – For this word, the “H” is silent, the first “o” is short, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AH-n’r//ˈɑ.nɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Honoring
 – For this word, the “H” is silent, the first “o” is short, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AH-n’r-ing//ˈɑ.nɚ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Honors
 – For this word, the “H” is silent, the first “o” is short, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/AH-n’r-z//ˈɑ.nɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Hoodie
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “oo” combination tuns into a true-schwa (like in the word “foot” or “put”), the “d” is a flap-d, and the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “e”

/-dee//ˈhə.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Hook
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “oo” combination tuns into a true-schwa (like in the word “foot” or “put”)

/hək//hək/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts a second syllable

Hooked
 – For this word, the “oo” combination tuns into a true-schwa (like in the word “foot” or “put”), the “k” is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/hə[k]-t//hə[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Hooligan
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

– /HOO-lih-gihn/ – /ˈhu.lə(ɪ).gə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hope
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “o” is long, the “p” is (sometimes) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /hoh[p]//ho[p]/

Hoped
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “o” is long, the “p” is (sometimes) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

– /hoh[p]-t//ho[p].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Hopeful (Hope-full)
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “o” is long, the “p” is almost stopped, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/HOH[P]-fəl/ – /ˈho[p].fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hopefully (Hope-fully)
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “o” is long, the “p” is almost stopped, the “e” is silent, and for the “-fully” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HOH[P]-fə-lee/ – /ˈho[p].fə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Horizontal
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “o” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “o” is short, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/hohr-ih-ZAHN-təl//hoɹ.ə(ɪ).ˈzɑn.təl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Hormone
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “o” is long, the second “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

– /HOHR-mohn//ˈhoɹ.mon/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hormones
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “o” is long, the second “o” is long, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /HOHR-mohnz//ˈhoɹ.monz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Horn
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, and the “o” is long

/horhn//horn/

Horrible
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “o” is long, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ible” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HOHR-ih-bəl//ˈhoɹ.ə(ɪ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Horrified
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “o” is long, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is an i-schwa, the “i” is long – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/HOHR-ih-fai[d]//ˈhoɹ.ə(ɪ).faiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Horror
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “o” is long, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the second “o” disappears

/HOHR-r’r//ˈhor-rɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Horse
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/hohrs//hors/

Horseshoe (Horse-Shoe)
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “o” is long, the “e” is silent, and the “oe” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”

/HOHRS-shoo//ˈhoɹs.ʃu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Hospitable
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “o” is short, the “i” is short, the “t” (usually) turns into the flap-d, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /hahs-PIH-duh-bəl//hɑs.ˈpɪ.ɾə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Hospital
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “o” is short, the “p” is pronounced almost like the letter “b”, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HAHS-pih-dəl//ˈhɑs.pə(ɪ).ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hospitality
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “o” is short, the “p” is pronounced almost like the letter “b”, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/hahs-pih--lih-dee//hɑs.bə(ɪ).ˈtæ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Host
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/hohs-[t]//hos.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Hosted
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “o” is long, the “t” is pronounced almost like the letter “d”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/HOH-sdih[d]//ˈho.sdə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hostess
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “o” is long, and for the “-ess” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HOHS-tihs//ˈhos.tə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Hostile
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “o” is short, and for the “-ile” suffix – the “i” can either be long or disappear, and the “e” is silent – (when the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “l” – [this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next]) (these are the two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /HAHS-dai-yl//ˈhɑs.daiː.jl/ – OR – /HAHS-dəl//ˈhɑs.dəl/ – Notice also that in both pronunciations the stress is on the first syllable –

Hot
 – For this word, the “o” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/hah[t]//hɑ[t]/

Hotel
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “o” is long, and the “e” is short

/hoh-TEHL//ho.ˈtɛl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Hotly
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “o” is short, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/HAH[T]-lee//ˈhɑ[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hour
 – For this word, the “H” is NOT pronounced (this is one of only a few words in The Common Tongue where-in the “H” at the beginning of the word is not pronounced), the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “o”, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “u” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to another)

/AH-wr//ˈɑ.wɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Hours
 – For this word, the “H” is NOT pronounced (this is one of only a few words in The Common Tongue where-in the “H” at the beginning of the word is not pronounced), the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “o”, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “u” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to another), and the final “s” is pronounce almost like the letter “z”

/AH-wr-z/ – /ˈɑ.wɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

House
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/hows//hɑus/

Household
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “e” is silent, the second “h” is pronounced, the “o” is long, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/HOWS-hohl-[d]//ˈhɑus.hol.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

Housing
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the
standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HOW-sing//ˈhɑu.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Housekeeper
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /HOWS-kee-p’r//ˈhaus.kiː.pɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

How
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, and the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “cow” or “plow” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/how/ – /hau/ –

However (How-Ever)
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the words “cow” or “plow” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/how-EH-v’r//hau.ˈɛ.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Hr

HR
 – For this acronym (and all acronyms which do not spell a word) we simply pronounce each letter with the name of that letter

/aych-ahr/ – /eiːtʃ-ɑɹ/ – 

Hu

Hug
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the final “g” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped

/huh[g]//hʌ[g]/

Huge
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /hyou-dʒ//hju.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” almost acts as a second syllable

Hugely
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “g” is soft, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/HYOUdʒ-lee/ – /ˈhjudʒ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hugged
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “u” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “g” but is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “g” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/huh[g]-d//hʌ[g].d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

Hugs
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the final “g” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/huh-gz//hʌ.gz/ – Notice also that the “gz” ending acts as a separate syllable

Human
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-man” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HYOO-mihn/ – /ˈhju.mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Humidity
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/hyou-MIH-dih-tee//hju.ˈmɪ.ɾə(ɪ).tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Humiliation
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/hyou-mih-lee-AY-shihn//hju.ˌmɪ.liː.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the major stress is on the fourth syllable and the minor stress on the second syllable

Hummer
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “u” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HUH-m’r/ – /ˈhʌ.mɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Humor
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HYOU-m’r/ – /ˈhju.mɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Humorous
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the first “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the first “o” disappears, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HYOO-m’r-ihs//ˈhju.mɚ.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Hundred
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “u” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/HUHN-dʒrih[d]//ˈhʌn.dʒɹə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hundredth
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “u” is short, the first “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the second “d” causes a glottal stop before the “th” combination, and the final “th” combination is un-voiced

/HUHN-dʒrih-`dth//ˈhʌn.dʒɹə(ɪ).ʔθ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Hungarian
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “u” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the “g” being pronounced as a hard “g”), the “g” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the second “a” turns into an i-schwa

/hung-GAYR-ee-yihn//hʌŋ.ˈge ɪɹ.iː.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Hungary
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “u” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the “g” being pronounced as a hard “g”), the “g” is hard, the “a” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/HUNG-gree//ˈhʌŋ.gɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hunger
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “u” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the “g” being pronounced as a hard “g”), the “g” is hard, and the “e” disappears

/HUNG-g’r//ˈhʌŋ.gɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hungry
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “u” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination, the “g” is hard (pronounced separately from the “ng” combination), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/HUNG-gree//ˈhʌŋ.gɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hunt
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “u” is short, and the final “t” (often) stopped

/huhn-[t]//hʌn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Hunting
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “u” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the
standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HUHN-ting//ˈhʌn.tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Hurry
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “u” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/H’R-ee//ˈhɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Hurt
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “u” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/h’r-[t]//hɚ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Hurts
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced and the “u” disappears

/h’r-ts//hɚ.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

Husband
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “u” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/HUHZ-bihn-[d]//ˈhʌz.bə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Hy

Hybrid
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/HAI-brih[d]//ˈhai.bɹə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Hydro-
 – For this prefix, the “H” is pronounced, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “o” is long

/HIGH-dʒroh//ˈhʌiː.dʒɹo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Hyperion
 – For this name, the “H” is pronounced, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “o” turns into an true-schwa

/high-PEER-ee-ən//hʌiː.ˈpiːɹ.iː.ən/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Hyper-Sensitivity
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), then the second “e” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the third “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/high-p’r-sehn-sih-TIH-vih-dee//ˌhʌiː.pɚ.ˌsɛn.sə(ɪ).ˈtɪ.və(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that there are minor stresses on the first and third syllables and that the major stress is on the fifth syllable

Hyphenate
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounce, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue),, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/HIGH-fih-nay[t]//ˈhʌiː.fə(ɪ).ne[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Hypocrisy
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “o” is short, the “c” is hard, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/hih-PAH-krih-see/ – /hɪ.ˈpɑ.kɹə(ɪ).siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Hypocrite
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/HIH-pə-krih[t]//ˈhɪ.pə.kɹɪ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Hypocritical (hypo-Critical)
– For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “y” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “i” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “c” is hard, then for then “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/HIH-pə-krih.dih.kəl//ˈhɪ.pə.kɹɪ.ɾə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Hypothesize
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “o” is short, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/hai-PAH-thih-saiz//haiːˈpɑ.θə.saiːz / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Hypothesized
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “o” is short, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the “d” is (often) stopped

/hai-PAH-thih-saiz-[d]//haiːˈpɑ.θə.saiːz.[d] / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

Hypothetical
 – For this word, the “H” is pronounced, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “e” is short, the second “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /high-puh-THEH-tih-k’l/ – /hʌiː.pə(ʌ).θɛ.ɾɪ.kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter H ) –


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