– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter I:  Ig ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue — a.k.a. — American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in The English Language, with more words added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of The English Language — both world-wide, and through-out America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Ig

 

Ic . Id . If . Il . Im . Ina-Inm . Inn-Inz . IoIp . Iq . Ir . Is . It

 

 

Ignorance
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard but is almost stopped, the “o” disappears, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHG-n’rihn-s//ˈɪ[g].ˈnɚ.ə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Ignorant (Ignore-ant)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard but is almost stopped, the “o” disappears, and for the “-ant” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHG-n’r-ihn-[t]//ˈɪ[g].ˈnɚ.ə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Ignore
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard but is almost stopped, the “o” is long, and the “e” is silent

/ih[g]-NOHR//ə(ɪ)[g].ˈnoɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Ignored
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “g” is (usually) stopped, the “o” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ih[g]-NOHR-d//ə(ɪ)[g].ˈnoɹ.ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

 

– ( American English PronunciationLetter I ) –


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