– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter I: Ina – Inm ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


In

 

Ic . Id . If . Ig . Il . Im . Inn-Inz . Ip . Iq . Ir . Is . It

 

In – For this word, the “I” is short

/ihn//ɪn/

 

Inability (in-Ability)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ability” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-uh-BIH-lih-dee//ˌə(ɪ)n.ə(ʌ).ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Inadequate (in-Adequate)
– For this word, the “I” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “qu” combination is pronounced like a “kw” combination, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-æ-dih-kwih[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈæ.ɾə(ɪ).kwə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Inappropriate (in-Appropriate)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “i” is is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-uh-PROH-pree-ih[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ə(ʌ).ˈpɹo.pɹiː.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Inauguration
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “g” is hard, the second “u” disappears, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-
voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-aw-g’r-AY-shihn//ə(ɪ)n.ˌɔ.gɚ.ˈaiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the main stress is on the second syllable

 

 

Inc.
– For this abbreviation, the “In” combination is pronounced like the “-ing” suffix, and the “c” is hard

/ing-k//ɪŋ.k/

 

Incentive
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the first “e” is short, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-SEHN-tihv//ə(ɪ)n.ˈsɛn.tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Incentives
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the first “e” is short, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “e” is silent (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z” 

/ihn-SEHN-tihv-z//ə(ɪ)n.ˈsɛn.tə(ɪ)v.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Incentivized
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the first “e” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “v” – the “e” of the “ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/ihn-SEHN-tih-vaiz-[d]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈsɛn.tə(ɪ).vaiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Inch
– For this word, the “i” is short

/ihn-ch//ɪn.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” acts as a second syllable

 

Incident
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-sih-dihn-[t]//ˈɪn.sə(ɪ).də(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Inclement
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “c” is hard, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-klə-mə(ɪ)n[t]//ˈɪn.klə.mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Include
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “e” is silent

/ihn-LOO[D]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈklu[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Including
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-LOO-ding//ə(ɪ)n.ˈklu.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Income (In-Come)
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the final “e” is silent

/IHN-kuhm//ˈɪn.kʌm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Incomes
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the final “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/IHN-kuhm-z//ˈɪn.kʌm.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Inconvenience (in-Convenience)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the first “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y”, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-kuhn-VEEN-yihn-s//ˌə(ɪ)n.kə(ʌ)n.ˈviːn.jə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Inconveniencing
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the first “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y”, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-kuhn-VEEN-yihn-sing//ˌə(ɪ)n.kə(ʌ)n.ˈviːn.jə(ɪ)n.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Incorporate (in-Corpor-ate)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the first “o” is long, the second “o” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” silent

/ihn-KOHR-p’r-ay[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈkoɹ.pɚ.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Incorporated (in-Corpor-ate-ed)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the first “o” is long, the second “o” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihn-KOHR-p’r-ay-dihd//ə(ɪ)n.ˈkoɹ.pɚ.e.ɾə(ɪ)ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Increase
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “e” is silent

/ihn-KREES//ə(ɪ)n.ˈkɹiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Increased
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/ihn-KREES-[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈkɹiːs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Increases
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ihn-KREE-sihz//ə(ɪ)n.ˈkɹiː.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Increasing
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and “-ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-KREE-sing//ə(ɪ)n.ˈkɹiː.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Increasingly
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-KREE-sing-lee//ə(ɪ)n.ˈkɹiː.sɪŋ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Indeed (in-Deed)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “ee” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihn-DEE[D]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈdiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Independence (in-Dependence)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-də-PEHN-dihns//ˌə(ɪ)n.də.ˈpɛn.də(ɪ)ns/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Independent (in-Dependent)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-də-PEHN-dihn-[t]//ˌə(ɪ)n.də.ˈpɛn.də(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable, that the major stress is on the third syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

 

Index
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “e” is short, and the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/IHN-deh-ks//ˈɪn.dɛ.ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a third syllable

 

India
– For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/IHN-dee-uh//ˈɪn.diː.ə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Indian
– For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/IHN-dee-ihn//ˈɪn.diː.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Indicate
– For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard,, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-dih-kay[t]//ˈɪn.də(ɪ).ke[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Indication
– For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-dih-KAY-shihn//ˌɪn.də(ɪ).ˈkeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Indicator
– For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-dih-kay-d’r//ˈɪn.də(ɪ).ke.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Indie
– For this word, the “I” is short, and the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-dee//ˈɪn.diː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Indirect (in-Direct)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the second “i” disappears, the “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/ihn-dih-REH[K]-t//ə ( ɪ )n.də ( ɪ )ˈɹɛ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Indispensable
– For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the first “e” is short, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-dih-SPEHN-suh-bəl//ɪn.də(ɪ).ˈspɛn.sə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Individual (in-Divide-ual)
– For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the third “i” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-dih-VIH-dʒoo-əl//ˌɪn.də(ɪ)ˈɪdʒəl/– Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Individuality (in-Divide-ual-ity)
– For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” turns into a true-schwa, the third “i” is short, the “second “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, the “a” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-də-vih-dʒoo-æ-lih-dee//ˌə(ɪ)n.də.ˌvɪ.dʒu.ˈæ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that there is are minor stresses on the first and third syllables and that the major stress is on the fifth syllable

 

Indonesia
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the “e” is long, the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/ihn-doh-NEE-zhuh//ɪn.do.ˈniː.ʒə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Indonesian
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the “e” is long, the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the final “a” turns into an i-schwa

/ihn-doh-NEE-zhihn//ɪn.do.ˈniː.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Indoor (in-Door)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and the “oo” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-DOHR//ə(ɪ)n.ˈdoɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Indoors (in-Doors)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and the “oo” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ihn-DOHR-z//ə(ɪ)n.ˈdoɹ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Induction
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-DUHK-shihn//ə(ɪ)n.ˈdʌk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Inductions
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ihn-DUHK-shihn-z//ə(ɪ)n.ˈdʌk.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Inductive
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-DUHK-tihv//ə(ɪ)n.ˈdʌk.tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Industrial
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “u” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-DUHS-chree-əl//ə(ɪ)n.ˈdʌs.tʃɹiː.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Industrialization
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “u” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the third “i” is long, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-duhs-chree-ə-lai-ZAY-shihn//ə(ɪ)n.ˌdʌs.tʃɹiː.ə.laiː.ˈzeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the sixth syllable

 

Industries
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/IHN-dəs-chreez//ˈɪn.dəs.tʃɹiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Industry
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/IHN-duhs-chree//ˈɪn.də(ʌ)s.tʃɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Ineffective (in-Effect-ive)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-ih-FEH[K]-tihv//ə(ɪ)n.ə(ɪ).ˈfɛ[k].tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Inefficient (in-Efficient)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is long, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination,and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-ee-FIH-shihn[t]//ə(ɪ)n.iː.ˈfɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third second syllable

 

Inept
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, and the “p” is (usually) stopped

/ihn-EH[P]T//ə(ɪ)nˈɛ[p]t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Inequality (in-Equality)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is long, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-ee-KWAW-lih-dee//ɪn.iː.ˈkwɔ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Inescapable (in-Escape-able)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the first “a” is a True Long “A”, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-ehs-KAY-puh-bəl//ə(ɪ)n.ɛs.ke.pə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Inevitable
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-EH-vih-duh-bəl//ə(ɪ)nˈɛ.və(ɪ).ɾə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Inevitably
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ably” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-EH-vih-də-blee//ə(ɪ)n.ˈɛ.və(ɪ).də.bliː/– Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Inexpensive (in-Expensive)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-ihk-SPEHN-sihv//ə(ɪ)n.ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpɛn.sə(ɪ)v/– Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Inexperienced (in-Experienced)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combination, the second “e” is long, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ence” suffix – the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/ihn-ihks-PEER-ee-ihn-st//ə(ɪ)n.ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpiːɹ.iː.ə(ɪ)n.st/– Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Infant
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-fihn-[t]//ˈɪn.fə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Infantile
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ile” suffix – the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is the product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-fihn-tai-yl//ˈɪn.fə(ɪ)n.taiː.jl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Infect
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/ihn-FEH[K]-t//ə(ɪ)n.ˈfɛ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and the final “t” acts as a third syllable

 

Infected
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihn-FEH[K]-tih[d]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈfɛ[k].tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and the final “t” acts as a third syllable

 

Infection
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-FEH[K]-tih[d]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈfɛ[k].tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Infectious
– For this word, the “I” turns into an i-schwa, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-tious” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-FEHK-shihs//ə(ɪ)n.ˈfɛk.ʃə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Infer
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and the “e” disappears

/ihn-FR//ə(ɪ)n.ˈfɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Inference
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and the “e” disappears, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft,
and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-FR-ihn-s//ə(ɪ)n.ˈfɚ.ə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the final “s” acts as a fourth syllable

 

Infinitive
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, the third “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-FIH-nih-tihv//ə(ɪ)n.ˈfɪ.nə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Inflation
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E’ Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-
voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-FLAY-shihn//ə(ɪ)n.ˈfleiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second stress

 

Inflict
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/ihn-FLIH[K]-t//ə(ɪ)n.ˈflɪ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and the final “t” acts as a third syllable

 

Influence
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “u” is long, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-floo-ihns//ˈɪn.flu.ə(ɪ)ns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Influenced
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “u” is long, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the second “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-floo-ihn-st//ɪn.flu.ə(ɪ)n.st/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Inform
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and the “o” is long

/ihn-FOHRM//ə(ɪ)n.ˈfoɹm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Informal
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-FOHR-məl//ə(ɪ)n.ˈfoɹ.məl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Information
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” disappears, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-f’r-MAY-shihn//ˌɪn.fɚ.ˈmeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Informed
– For this word, the “I” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is long, and since the root-word ends with the letter “m”, then the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/ihn-FOHRM-d//ə(ɪ)n.ˈfoɹm.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Infrastructure
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-fruh-schruk-ch’r//ˈɪn.fɹə(ʌ).stʃʌk.tʃəɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Ingredient
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-GREE-dee-ihn-[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈgɹiː.ɾiː.ə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

 

Ingredients
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-GREE-dee-ihn-ts//ə(ɪ)n.ˈgɹiː.ɾiː.ə(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Inhabitant
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn--bih-tihn-[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈhæ.bə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

 

Inhabitants
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn--bih-tihn-[t]s//ə(ɪ)n.ˈhæ.bə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)n.[t]s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Inherent
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ihn-HAYR-ihn-[t]//ɪn.ˈheɪɹ.ə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Inherit
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ihn-HAYR-ih[t]//ɪn.ˈheɪɹ.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Inheritance
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-HAYR-ih-tihn-s//ə(ɪ)n.ˈheɪɹ.ə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Inherited
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is an i-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihn-HAYR-ih-tih[d]//ɪn.ˈheɪɹ.ə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Inimitable
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, the third “i” is an i-scwha, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-IH-mih-duh-bəl//ə(ɪ)n.ˈnɪ.mə(ɪ).də(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Initial
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the “-tial” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ih-NIH-shəl//ə(ɪ).ˈnɪʃəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Initially
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, for the “-tial” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the first “l” merges with the “-ly” suffix, then the “ll” combination is pronounced like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/ih-NIH-shə-lee//ə(ɪ)ˈnɪ.ʃə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Initiate
– For this word, the “I” turns into an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ih-NIH-shee-yay-dih[d]//ə(ɪ).ˈnɪ.ʃiː.je.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Initiated
– For this word, the “I” turns into an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ih-NIH-shee-yay-dih[d]//ə(ɪ).ˈnɪ.ʃiː.je.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Initiative
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short the “t” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “i” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the consonant “y”, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ih-NIH-shyuh-tihv//ə(ɪ).ˈnɪ.ʃjə(ʌ).tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Injure
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/IHN-dʒ’r//ˈɪn.dʒɚɾ/– Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Injured
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “u” disappears, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/IHN-dʒ’r-[d]//ˈɪn.dʒɚ.[ɾ]/– Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Injuries
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “u” disappears, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/IHN-dʒ’r-eez//ˈɪn.dʒɚ.iːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Injury
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “u” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/IHN-dʒ’r-ee//ˈɪn.dʒɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Ink
– For this word, the “I” is short, and the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it)

/ing-k//ˈɪŋk/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Inlet
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/IHN-lih[t]//ˈɪn.lə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter I ) –


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