– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter I:  Inn – Inz ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Ii

 

Ic . Id . If . Ig . Il . Im . Ina-Inm . Ip . Iq . Ir . Is . It

 

Innate
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-AY[T]//ə(ɪ)nˈe[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Inner
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IH-n’r// ˈɪ.nɚ/– Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Innocent
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is soft, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-uh-sihn-[t]//ˈɪn.ə(ʌ).sə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Innovate
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounce simply as a single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-uh-vay[t]//ˈɪn.ə(ʌ).ve[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Innovation
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-uh-VAY-shihn//ɪn.ə(ʌ).ˈveiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Innovative
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-uh-vay-dihv//ɪn.ə(ʌ).ve.ɾə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Inordinate
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-OHR-dih-nih[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈoɹ.də(ɪ).nə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Insect
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/IHN-seh[k]-t//ˈɪn.sɛ[k].t / – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Inseparable (in-Separate-able)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” is short, the first “a” disappears, the second “a” combines with the “-able” suffix, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-SEHP-ruh-bəl//ə(ɪ)n.ˈsɛp.ɹə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Insert (noun)
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “e” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped)

/IHN-s’r-[t]//ˈɪn.sɚ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Insert (verb)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ihn-S’R-[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈsɚ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Inside (in-Side)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/ihn-SAI[D]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈsaiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Insight (in-Sight)
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “igh” is pronounced like in the words “night” or “fight” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/IHN-sigh[t]//ˈɪn.sʌiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Insightful
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “igh” is pronounced like in the words “night” or “fight” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-sigh[t]-ful//ˈɪn.sʌiː[t].fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Insist
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-SIHS-[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈsɪs.[t] / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Insists
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-SIHS-ts//ə(ɪ)n.ˈsɪs.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Inspector
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, and the “o” disappears

/ihn-s-PEHK-d’r//ɪn.s.ˈpɛk.dɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Inspiration
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the second “i” disappears, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-sp’r-AY-shihn//ˌə(ɪ)n.ˈspɚ.eiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Inspired
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ire” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihn-SPIGH-yr-[d]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈspʌiː.jɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Inspiring
– For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-SPIGH-yr-ing//ɪn.ˈspʌiː.jɚ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Instagram
– For this word, the “I” is short, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is hard, and the second “a” is short

/IHN-stuh-græm//ˈɪn.stə(ʌ).gɹæm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Install
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l”

/ihn-STAWL//ə(ɪ)n.ˈstɔl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Instance
– For this word, the “I” is short, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-stihn-s//ɪn.stə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Instant
– For this word, the “I” is short, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-stihn-[t]//ˈɪn.stə(ɪ)n.t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Instead
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihn-STEH[D]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈstɛ[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Instigate
– For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-stih-gay[t]//ˈɪn.stə(ɪ).ge[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Institute
– For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “u” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/IHN-stih-too[t]//ˈɪn.stə(ɪ).tu[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Institution
– For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “u” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-stih-TOO-shihn//ˌɪn.stə(ɪ).ˈtu.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Institutions
– For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “u” is long, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ihn-stih-TOO-shihn-z//ˌɪn.stə(ɪ).ˈtu.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Institutionalized
– For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “u” is long, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/ihn-stih-TOO-shihn-əl-aiz-[d]//ˌɪn.stə(ɪ).ˈtu.ʃə(ɪ)n.əl.aiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable, that the major stress is on the third syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

 

Instruct
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ihn-s-CHRUHK-[t]//ə(ɪ)n.s.ˈtʃɹʌk.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Instruction
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-s-CHRUHK-shihn//ə(ɪ)n.s.ˈtʃɹʌk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Instructor
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and the final “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-s-CHRUHK-t’r//ə(ɪ)n.s.ˈtʃɹʌk.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Instrument
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination, the “u” is a u-schwa, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-s-chruh-mihn-[t]//ˈɪn.s.tʃɹə(ʌ).mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

 

Insubordination
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “u” is a u-schwa, “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-suh-bohr-dih-NAY-shuhn//ˌɪn.sə(ʌ).ˌboɹ.ɾə(ɪ).ˈneiː.ʃə(ʌ)n/ – Notice also that there are minor stresses on the first and third syllables and that the major stress is on the fifth syllable

 

Insult
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “u” is a u-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/IHN-suhl-[t]//ˈɪn.sə(ʌ)l.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Insulting
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “u” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-SUHL-ting//ə(ɪ)n.ˈsʌl.tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Insurance
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-SH’R-ihn-s//ɪn.ˈsəɹ.ə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Insure
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/ihn-SH’R//ɪn.ʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Insurers
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, there is a extra phantom “r” in-between the first “r” and the letter “e” (this is a product of the two “r” sounds right next to each other. The phantom-R is pronounced like the letter “R” when it is at the beginning of a word), the “e” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ihn-SH’R-r’r-z//ɪn.ʃɚ.rɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Intangible
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “a” is short, the “g” is soft, and for the “-ible” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-TAN-dʒih-bəl//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtɑn.dʒə(ɪ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Integral
– There are two pronunciations of this word, for the first pronunciation, the “I” is an i-schwa, and the “e” is short – for the second pronunciation, the “I” is short, and the “e” turns into a true-schwa – and for both pronunciations, the “g” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-TEH-grəl//ə(ɪ)nˈtɛ.gɹəl/ – Or – /IHN-tə-grəl//ˈɪn.tə.gɹəl/ – Notice that the pronunciation changes depending on which stress is used –

 

Integrate
– There are two pronunciations of this word, the “I” is short, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-tə-gray[t]//ˈɪn.tə.geɹ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Integrated
– There are two pronunciations of this word, the “I” is short, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” combines with the “-ed” ending (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ed” ending, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/IHN-tə-gray-dih[d]//ˈɪn.tə.gɹe.ɾə(ɪ)ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Integrity
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-TEH-grih-dee//ɪn.ˈtɛ.gɹə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Intellectual
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-tə.LEH[K]-choo-əl//ə(ɪ)n.tə.ˈlɛk.tʃu.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Intelligence
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-TEH-lih-dʒihn-s//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtɛ.lə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Intelligent
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-TEH-lih-dʒihn-[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtɛ.lə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)n-[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

 

Intend
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/ihn-TEHN-[d]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtɛn.[d] / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

 

Intended
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, and since the root-word ends with the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihn-TEHN-dih[d]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtɛn.də(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Intent
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ihn-TEHN-[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Intention
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-TEHN-shihn//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtɛn.shin/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Interact (inter-Act)
– For this word, the “I” turns into an i-schwa, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “a” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/ihn-t’r-æ[k]T//ə(ɪ)n.tɚ.ˈæ[k]t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Interactive (inter-Act-ive)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “a” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-t’r-æK-tihv//ə(ɪ)n.tɚ.ˈæk.tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Interest
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the following “e” disappearing, making the next sound the letter “r” directly after it), the first “e” disappears, and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-chrihs-[t]//ˈɪn.tʃɹə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Interested
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the following “e” disappearing, making the next sound the letter “r” which is directly after it), the first “e” disappears, and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/IHN-chrihs-tih[d]//ˈɪn.tʃɹə(ɪ)s.tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Interesting (#1)
– This word has two common pronunciations. This first one is more logical but used less often. For this version, the “I is short, the first “e” disappears, for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-t’r-ehs-ting//ˈɪn.tɚ.ɛs.tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Interesting (#2)
– This word has two common pronunciations. This second one is less logical but used more often. For this version, the “I is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the following “e” disappearing, making the next sound the letter “r” which is directly after it), the first “e” disappears, for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-chrihs-ting//ˈɪn.tʃɹə(ɪ)s.tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Interestingly
– For this word, the “I is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the following “e” disappearing, making the next sound the letter “r” which is directly after it), the first “e” disappears, for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-chrihs-ting-lee//ˈɪn.tʃɹə(ɪ)s.tɪŋ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Interests
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the following “e” disappearing, making the next sound the letter “r” which is directly after it), the first “e” disappears, and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-chrihs-ts//ˈɪn.tʃɹə(ɪ)s.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Interfere
– For this word, the “I” is short, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is long, the third “e” is silent

/ihn-t’r-FEER//ˌɪn.tɚ.ˈfiːɹ/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Interferes
– For this word, the “I” is short, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is long, the third “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ihn-t’r-FEER-z//ˌɪn.tɚ.ˈfiːɹ.z/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable, that the major stress is on the third syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Interior
– For this word, the first “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is long, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the another), and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-TEER-ee-yr//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtiːɹ.iː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Intermediate (inter-Mediate)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-t’r-MEE-dee-ih[t]//ɪn.tɚ.ˈmiː.ɾiː.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Intern
– For this word, the “I” is short, and for the “-ern” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-t’rn//ˈɪn.tɚɹn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Internal
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ern” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-T’R-nəl//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtɚ.nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

International (inter-National)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” disappears, the “a” is short, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-t’r-.shih.nəl//ə(ɪ)n.tɚ.ˈnæ.ʃə(ɪ).nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Internationalization (inter-National-ize-ation)
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “e” disappears, the “a” is short, for the first “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the third “i” is long, the third “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the second “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-t’r--shih-nəl-ai-ZAY-shihn//ˌə(ɪ)n.tɚ.ˈnæ.ʃə(ɪ).nəl.aiː.ˈzeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stresses on the first syllable and that there are major stresses on the third and seventh syllables

 

Internet (inter-Net)
– For this word, the “I” is short, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/IHN-t’r-neh[t]//ˈɪn.tɚ.nɛ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Internship
– For this word, the “I” is short, for the “-ern” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ship” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “p” is (often)
stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-t’rn-shih[p]//ˈɪn.tɚn.ʃə(ɪ)[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Interpersonal (inter-Personal)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” disappears, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-t’r-P’R-sə.nəl//ˌə(ɪ)n.tɚˈpɚ.sə.nəl/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Interpret
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” disappears, and the last “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ihn-T’R-prih[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtɚ.pɹə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Interpretation
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-t’r-prih-TAY-shihn//ə(ɪ)n.ˌtɚ.pɹə(ɪ).ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n /– Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Interrupt
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped

/ihn-t’r-UH[P]-t//ˌə(ɪ)n.ˈtɚ.ʌ[p].t / – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable, that the major stress is on the third syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Interruption
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-t’r-UH[P]-shihn//ˌə(ɪ)n.tɚ.ˈʌ[p].ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Intersect
– For this word, the “I” is short, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/ihn-t’r-SEH[K]-[t]//ɪn.tɚ.ˈsɛ[k].[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Intertwined (inter-Twined)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” disappears, the second “i” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “n”, the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/ihn-t’r-TWAIN-[d]//ə(ɪ)n.tɚ.ˈtwaiːn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Interval
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “e” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-t’r-vəl//ˈɪn.tɚ.vəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Intervening
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-t’r-VEE-ning//ə(ɪ)n.tɚ.ˈviː.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Interview (inter-View)
– For this word, the “I” is short, the first “e” disappears, the “iew” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”

/IHN-t’r-vyoo//ˈɪn.tɚ.vju/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Interviewee (inter-View-ee)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” disappears, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and then the final “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-t’r-vyoo-WEE//ˌə(ɪ)n.tɚ.vju.ˈwiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Interviewing (inter-View-ing)
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “e” disappears, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-t’r-vou-wing//ˈɪn.tɚ.vju.wɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Intimate
– For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-tih-mih[t]//ˈɪn.tiː.mə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Intimidating
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, the third “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-TIH-mih-day-ding//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtɪ.mə(ɪ).de.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Into – For this word, the “I” is short, and the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”

/IHN-too//ˈɪn.tu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Intonation (in-Tone-ation)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-toh-NAY-shihn//ə(ɪ)n.toh.ˈNAY.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Intoxicated
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a True Long A, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” of the “-ed” ending is an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihn-TOKS-ih-kay-dih[d]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtɑks.ə(ɪ).ke.ɾə(ɪ)ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Intranet (intra-Net)
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/IHN-chruh-neh[t]//ˈɪn.tʃɹə(ʌ).nɛ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Intransigence
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-CHRæN-zih-dʒihn-s//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtʃɹæn.zə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Intrigue
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “g” is hard, the “ue” combination is silent

/IHN-chreeg//ˈɪn.tʃɹiːg/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Intriguing
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “g” is hard, the “u” is silent, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-CHREE-ging//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtʃɹiː.gɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Intrinsic
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination, the second “i” is short, the “s” is pronouncehttp://www.pronunciation.givemesomeenglish.com/american-english-pronunciation-letter-t/american-english-pronunciation-letter-t-word-list/#theoreticald almost like the letter “z”, the third “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/ihn-CHRIHN-zi[k]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtʃɹɪn.zə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Intro
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “o” is long

/IHN-chroh//ˈɪn.tʃɹo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Introduce
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/ihn-chrə-DOOS//ə(ɪ)n.tʃɹə.ˈdus/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Introduced
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, the “c” is soft, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the soft letter “c” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/ihn-chrə-DOOST//ə(ɪ)n.tʃɹə.ˈdust/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Introduction
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-chrə-DUHK-shihn//ˌə(ɪ)n.tʃɹə.ˈdʌk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Introductions
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-chrə-DUHK-shihn-z//ˌə(ɪ)n.tʃɹə.ˈdʌk.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable, that the major stress is on the third syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Intrusive
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-CHROO-sihv//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtʃɹu.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Intuit
– For this word, the “I” turns into an i-schwa, the “u” is long, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ihn-TOO-ih[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtu.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Intuition
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “u” is long, the second “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-too-IH-shihn//ə(ɪ)n.tu.ˈɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Inuit
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/IHN-you-ih[t]//ˈɪn.ju.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Invent
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ihn-VEHN-[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈvɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Invention
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-VEHN-shihn//ə(ɪ)n.ˈvɛn.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Inventory
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and for “-ory” suffix – the “o” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-vihn-tohr-ee//ˈɪn.və(ɪ)n.toɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Invest
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/ihn-VEHS[T]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈvɛs[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Investigate
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-VEHS-tih-gay[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈvɛs.tə(ɪ).ge[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Investigation
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-vehs-tih-GAY-shihn//ˌə(ɪ)n.vɛs.tə(ɪ).ˈgeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/– Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Investment
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” is short, the first “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-VEHS[T]-mihnt//ə(ɪ)n.ˈvɛs[t].mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Investor
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-VEHS-t’r//ə(ɪ)n.ˈvɛs.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Invitation
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-vih-TAY-shihn//ə(ɪ)n.və(ɪ).ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Invite (noun)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/IHN-vigh[t]//ˈɪn.vʌiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Invite (verb)
– For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/ihn-VIGH[T]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈvʌiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Invoice
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, the “c” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/IHN-voys//ˈɪn.voiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Invoices
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, the “c” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/IHN-voy-sih-z//ˈɪn.voiː.sə(ɪ).z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Involve
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/ihn-VAWL-v//ə(ɪ)n.ˈvɔl.v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the final “v” acts as a third syllable

 

Involved
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is pronounced like an “aw” combination, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “v” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/ihn-VAWL-v-[d]//ɪn.ˈvɔl.v.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Involvement
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the first “e” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-VAWL-v-mihn-[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈvɔl.v.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter I ) –


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