– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter I ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Ii

 

Ib . Ic . Id . Ie . If . Ig . Ih . Ik . Il . Im . Ina . Inc . Ind . Ine . Inf . Ing . Inh . Ini . Inj . InkInl . Inn . Ino . Ins . Int . Inu . Inv . Io . Ip . Iq . Ir . Is . It

 

I
 – The word for the letter “I” is pronounced simply as the long letter “i”

/ai//aiː/

Ib

Ic

Ice
 – For this word, the “I” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/ighs/ – /ʌiːs/ –

Ice-Cream
 – For this word, the “I” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent, then the “C” is hard, and the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

– /IGHS-kreem/ – /ˈʌiːs.kɹiːm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Iconic
 – For this word, the “I” is long, the first “c” is hard, the “o” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa and the final “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/ai-KAH-nih[k]//aiː.ˈkɑ.nə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Id

Idea
 – For this word, the “I” is long, the “e” is long, and the “a” turns into a u-schwa

– /ai-DEE-uh//aiː.ˈdiː.ə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Ideal
 – For this word, the “I” is long, and the “e” is long, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

/ai-DEE-əl//aiː.ˈdiː.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Idealistic
 – For this word, the “I” is long, the “e” is long, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ai-dee-əl-IHS-tih[k]//aiː.ˌdiː.əl.ˈɪs.tə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the main stress is on the fourth syllable –

Identifies
 – For this word, the “I” is long, the first “e” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ai-DEHN-tih-faiz//aiː.ˈdɛn.tə(ɪ).faiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Identify
 – For this word, the “I” is long, the “e” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/ai-DEHN-tih-fai/ – /aiː.ˈdɛn.tə(ɪ).faiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Identity
– For this word, the “I” is long, the “e” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ai-DEHN-tih-tee/ – /aiː.ˈdɛn.tə(ɪ).tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Ideologies
 – For this word, the “I” is long, the “e” is long, the “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is soft, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ai-dee-AH-lə-dʒeez/ – /ˌaiː.diː.ˈɑ.lə(ʌ).dʒiːz/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

Ideology
 – For this word, the “I” is long, the “e” is long, and for the “-ology” suffix – the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ai-dee-AH-lə-dʒee/ – /ˌaiː.diː.ˈɑ.lə.dʒiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

Idiom
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “o” turns into a u-schwa

/IH-dee-uhm/ – /ˈɪ.ɾiː.ə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Idioms
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/IH-dee-uhm-z/ – /ˈɪ.ɾiː.ə(ʌ)m.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Idiot
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the second “i” is pronounced like the long “e”, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/IH-dee-ih[t]//ˈɪ.ɾiː.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Idolize
 – For this word the “I” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “d” is a flap-d, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

– /IGH-dəl-aiz//ˈʌiː.ɾəl.aɪz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Idolized
 – For this word the “I” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “d” is a flap-d, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /IGH-dəl-aiz[d]//ˈʌiː.ɾəl.aɪz[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Ie

If

If
 – For this word, the “I” is short

/ihf/ – /ɪf/ –

Ig

Ignorance (Ignore-ance)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard but is almost stopped, the “o” disappears, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHG-n’rihn-s/ – /ˈɪ[g].ˈnɚ.ə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Ignorant (Ignore-ant)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard but is almost stopped, the “o” disappears, and for the “-ant” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHG-n’r-ihn-[t]/ – /ˈɪ[g].ˈnɚ.ə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Ignore
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard but is almost stopped, the “o” is long, and the “e” is silent

/ih[g]-NOHR/ – /ə(ɪ)[g].ˈnoɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Ignored
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “g” is (usually) stopped, the “o” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ih[g]-NOHR-d/ – /ə(ɪ)[g].ˈnoɹ.ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

Ih

Ik

Il

I’ll
 – For this contracted word combination, the “I” is long, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “I” and the “l”, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/AI-əl//ˈaiː.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Ill
 – For this word, the “I” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ihl/ – /ɪl/ –

Illegal
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is long, the “g” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihl-EE-gəl//ə(ɪ)l.ˈiː.gəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Illinois
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “oi”  combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, and the final “s” is silent

/ihl-ih-NOY/ – /ɪl.ə(ɪ).ˈnoiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Illness
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHL-nihs/ – /ˈɪl.nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Illusion
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is long, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ih-LOO-zhin//ə(ɪ).ˈlu.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Illustrate
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” turns into an i-schwa the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHL-ihs-chray[t]/ – /ˈɪl.ə(ɪ)s.tʃɹe[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Illustration
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” turns into an i-schwa the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihl-ihs-CHRAY-shihn/ – /ɪl.ə(ɪ)s.ˈtʃɹe.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Im

Image
 – For this word, the “I” is short, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /IH-mihdʒ//ˈɪ.mə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Images
 – For this word, the “I” is short, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and since the word is plural – the “e” merges with the “es” ending and turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /IH-mih-dʒihz/ – /ˈɪ.mə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Imaginary
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “a” is short, the “g” is soft, the second “i” is and i-schwa, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ih--dʒih-nayr-ee/ – /ə(ɪ).ˈmæ.dʒə(ɪ).neɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Imagination
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “a” is short, the “g” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ih--dʒih-NAY-shihn/ – /ə(ɪ).ˌmæ.dʒə(ɪ).ˈneiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

Imaginative
– For this word, the “I” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is short, the “g” is soft, the second “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ih--dʒih-nuh-tihv//ə(ɪ).ˈmæ.dʒə(ɪ).nə(ʌ).tɪv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Imagine
 – For this word, the “I” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is short, the “g” is soft, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/ih--dʒihn//ə(ɪ).ˈmæ.dʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Imitate
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” s silent

/SAI-lihn-[t]//ˈsaiː.lə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Immediately
 – For this word, the “I” turns into an i-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ih-MEE-dee-ih[t]-lee//ə(ɪ).ˈmiː.ɾiː.ə(ɪ)[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Immerse
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/ih-M’R-s//ə(ɪ).ˈmɚ.s / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

Immersed
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” disappears, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/ih-M’R-st//ə(ɪ).ˈmɚ.st / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a third syllable –

Immersion
 – For this word, the “I” turns into an i-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” disappears, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ih-M’R-zhihn//ə(ɪ).ˈmɚ.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Immoral (im-Moral)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ih-MOHR-əl//ə(ɪ).ˈmoɹ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Immune
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the final “e” is silent

/ih-MYOON/ – /ə(ɪ).ˈmjun/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Impact (noun & verb)
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “a” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped

– /IHM-pæ[k]-t//ˈɪm.pæ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable –

Impatience (im-Patience)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “ti” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /ihm-PAY-shihn-s/ – /ɪm.ˈpeiː.ʃɪn.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Impatient (im-Patient)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “ti” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /ihm-PAY-shihn-[t]/ – /ɪm.ˈpeiː.ʃɪn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Imperialism
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is long, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-PEER-ee-yuh-lih-zəm//ə(ɪ)m.ˈpiːɹ.iː.jə(ʌ).lə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Implement
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the first “e” turns into an true-schwa, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the
final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHM-plə-mihn-[t]//ˈɪm.plə.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the final “t” (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Implementation
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihm-plə-mehn-TAY-shihn//ˌɪm.plə(ʌ).mə(ɪ)n.ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress is on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

Implication
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-plih-KAY-shihn/ – /ˌɪm.plə(ɪ)ˈkeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Imply
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/ihm-PLAI//ə(ɪ)mˈplaiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Import (noun)
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/IHM-pohr-[t]//ˈɪm.poɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a thirds syllable

Importance
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is long, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-POHR-tihn-s//ˈə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Important
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the first “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihm-POHR-[t]ihn-[t]//ə(ɪ)m.ˈpoɹ.[t]ə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Impose
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/ihm-POHZ//ə(ɪ)mˈpoz / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Impossible
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “o” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ible” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-PAH-sih-bəl//ə(ɪ)m.ˈpɑ.sə(ɪ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Impress
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-PREHS//ə(ɪ)mˈpɹɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Impressed
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/ihm-PREHS-[t]//ə(ɪ)m.ˈpɹɛs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Impression
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa,, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination merges with the “-sion” suffix, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-PREH-shihn//ə(ɪ)m.ˈpɹɛ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Impressive
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa,, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-PREH-sihv//ə(ɪ)m.ˈpɹɛ.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Impromptu
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is short, the second “p” is (often) stopped, and the “u” is long

– /ihm-PRAHM[P]-too//ə(ɪ)m.ˈpɹɑm[p].tu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Improper
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-PRAH-p’r//ə(ɪ)m.ˈpɹɑ.pɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Improve
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the final “e” is silent

– /ihm-PROOV//ə(ɪ)m.ˈpɹuv/ – Notice also that  the stress is on the second syllable –

Improved
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “v” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /ihm-PROOV[D]//ə(ɪ)m.pɹuv[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Improvement
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, the first “e” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-PROOV-mihn[t]//ə(ɪ)m.ˈpɹuv.mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Impulse
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “u” is a u-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

– /IHM-puhl-s//ˈɪm.pʌl.s/ – Notice that the stress is on the first syllable –

Impulsive
 – For this word, the “I” turns into an i-schwa, the “u” is short, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /Ihm-PUHL-sihv//ə(ɪ)m.ˈpʌl.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice that the stress is on the second syllable –

Ina

In – For this word, the “I” is short

/ihn//ɪn/

Inability (in-Ability)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ability” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-uh-BIH-lih-dee//ˌə(ɪ)n.ə(ʌ).ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable  –

Inadequate (in-Adequate)
– For this word, the “I” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “qu” combination is pronounced like a “kw” combination, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihn-æ-dih-kwih[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈæ.ɾə(ɪ).kwə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Inappropriate (in-Appropriate)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “i” is is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-uh-PROH-pree-ih[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ə(ʌ).ˈpɹo.pɹiː.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Inauguration
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “g” is hard, the second “u” disappears, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-
voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-aw-g’r-AY-shihn//ə(ɪ)n.ˌɔ.gɚ.ˈaiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the main stress is on the second syllable

Inc

Inc.
 – For this abbreviation, the “In” combination is pronounced like the “-ing” suffix, and the “c” is hard

/ing-k/ – /ɪŋ.k/ –

Incentive
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the first “e” is short, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-SEHN-tihv//ə(ɪ)n.ˈsɛn.tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Incentivized
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the first “e” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “v” – the “e” of the “ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/ihn-SEHN-tih-vaiz-[d]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈsɛn.tə(ɪ).vaiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Inch
 – For this word, the “i” is short

– /ihn-ch/ – /ɪn.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” acts as a second syllable –

Incident
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-sih-dihn-[t]//ˈɪn.sə(ɪ).də(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Inclement
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “c” is hard, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-klə-mə(ɪ)n[t]//ˈɪn.klə.mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Include
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “e” is silent

/ihn-LOO[D]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈklu[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Including
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-LOO-ding//ə(ɪ)n.ˈklu.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Income (In-Come)
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the final “e” is silent

/IHN-kuhm//ˈɪn.kʌm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Incomes
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the final “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/IHN-kuhm-z//ˈɪn.kʌm.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

Inconvenience (in-Convenience)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the first “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y”, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-kuhn-VEEN-yihn-s/ – /ˌə(ɪ)n.kə(ʌ)n.ˈviːn.jə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

Incorporate (in-Corpor-ate)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the first “o” is long, the second “o” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” silent

/ihn-KOHR-p’r-ay[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈkoɹ.pɚ.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Incorporated (in-Corpor-ate-ed)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the first “o” is long, the second “o” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihn-KOHR-p’r-ay-dihd//ə(ɪ)n.ˈkoɹ.pɚ.e.ɾə(ɪ)ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Increase
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “e” is silent

/ihn-KREES//ə(ɪ)n.ˈkɹiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Increased
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /ihn-KREES-[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈkɹiːs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Increases
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /ihn-KREE-sihz//ə(ɪ)n.ˈkɹiː.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Increasing
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and “-ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihn-KREE-sing//ə(ɪ)n.ˈkɹiː.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Increasingly
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-KREE-sing-lee/ – /ə(ɪ)n.ˈkɹiː.sɪŋ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Ind

Indeed (in-Deed)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “ee” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /ihn-DEE[D]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈdiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Independence (in-Dependence)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-də-PEHN-dihns//ˌə(ɪ)n.də.ˈpɛn.də(ɪ)ns/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Independent (in-Dependent)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-də-PEHN-dihn-[t]//ˌə(ɪ)n.də.ˈpɛn.də(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable, that the major stress is on the third syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

Index
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “e” is short, and the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/IHN-deh-ks//ˈɪn.dɛ.ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a third syllable –

India
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/IHN-dee-uh//ˈɪn.diː.ə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Indian
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/IHN-dee-ihn/ – /ˈɪn.diː.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Indicate
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard,, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-dih-kay[t]//ˈɪn.də(ɪ).ke[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Indication
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-dih-KAY-shihn//ˌɪn.də(ɪ).ˈkeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Indicator
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /IHN-dih-kay-d’r//ˈɪn.də(ɪ).ke.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Indie
 – For this word, the “I” is short, and the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /IHN-dee//ˈɪn.diː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Indirect (in-Direct)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwathe second “i” disappears, the “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/ihn-dih-REH[K]-t//ə ( ɪ )n.də ( ɪ )ˈɹɛ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Indispensable
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the first “e” is short, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-dih-SPEHN-suh-bəl//ɪn.də(ɪ).ˈspɛn.sə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Individual (in-Divide-ual)
– For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the third “i” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-dih-VIH-dʒoo-əl//ˌɪn.də(ɪ)ˈɪdʒəl/– Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Individuality (in-Divide-ual-ity)
– For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” turns into a true-schwa, the third “i” is short, the “second “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, the “a” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-də-vih-dʒoo-æ-lih-dee//ˌə(ɪ)n.də.ˌvɪ.dʒu.ˈæ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that there is are minor stresses on the first and third syllables and that the major stress is on the fifth syllable –

Indonesia
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the “e” is long, the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/ihn-doh-NEE-zhuh//ɪn.do.ˈniː.ʒə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Indonesian
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the “e” is long, the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the final “a” turns into an i-schwa

/ihn-doh-NEE-zhihn//ɪn.do.ˈniː.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Indoor (in-Door)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and the “oo” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-DOHR//ə(ɪ)n.ˈdoɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Indoors (in-Doors)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and the “oo” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ihn-DOHR-z//ə(ɪ)n.ˈdoɹ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

Induction
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-DUHK-shihn//ə(ɪ)n.ˈdʌk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Inductions
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ihn-DUHK-shihn-z//ə(ɪ)n.ˈdʌk.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Inductive
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-DUHK-tihv//ə(ɪ)n.ˈdʌk.tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Industrial
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “u” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-DUHS-chree-əl//ə(ɪ)n.ˈdʌs.tʃɹiː.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Industrialization
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “u” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the third “i” is long, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-duhs-chree-ə-lai-ZAY-shihn//ə(ɪ)n.ˌdʌs.tʃɹiː.ə.laiː.ˈzeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the sixth syllable

Industries
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/IHN-dəs-chreez/ – /ˈɪn.dəs.tʃɹiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Industry
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /IHN-duhs-chree//ˈɪn.də(ʌ)s.tʃɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Ine

Ineffective (in-Effect-ive)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-ih-FEH[K]-tihv//ə(ɪ)n.ə(ɪ).ˈfɛ[k].tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Inefficient (in-Efficient)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is long, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination,and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-ee-FIH-shihn[t]/ – /ə(ɪ)n.iː.ˈfɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third second syllable –

Inequality (in-Equality)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is long, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-ee-KWAW-lih-dee//ɪn.iː.ˈkwɔ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Inescapable (in-Escape-able)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the first “a” is a True Long “A”, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-ehs-KAY-puh-bəl/ – /ə(ɪ)n.ɛs.ke.pə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Inevitable
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-EH-vih-duh-bəl//ə(ɪ)nˈɛ.və(ɪ).ɾə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Inevitably
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ably” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-EH-vih-də-blee//ə(ɪ)n.ˈɛ.və(ɪ).də.bliː/– Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Inexpensive (in-Expensive)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-ihk-SPEHN-sihv//ə(ɪ)n.ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpɛn.sə(ɪ)v/– Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Inexperienced (in-Experienced)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combination, the second “e” is long, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ence” suffix – the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/ihn-ihks-PEER-ee-ihn-st//ə(ɪ)n.ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpiːɹ.iː.ə(ɪ)n.st/– Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a separate syllable –

Inf

Infant
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-fihn-[t]//ˈɪn.fə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Infantile
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ile” suffix – the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is the product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-fihn-tai-yl//ˈɪn.fə(ɪ)n.taiː.jl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Infect
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/ihn-FEH[K]-t//ə(ɪ)n.ˈfɛ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and the final “t” acts as a third syllable –

Infected
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihn-FEH[K]-tih[d]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈfɛ[k].tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and the final “t” acts as a third syllable –

Infection
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-FEH[K]-tih[d]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈfɛ[k].tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Infectious
 
– For this word, the “I” turns into an i-schwa, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-tious” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-FEHK-shihs//ə(ɪ)n.ˈfɛk.ʃə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Infer
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and the “e” disappears

/ihn-FR//ə(ɪ)n.ˈfɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Inference
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and the “e” disappears, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft,
and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-FR-ihn-s//ə(ɪ)n.ˈfɚ.ə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the final “s” acts as a fourth syllable –

Infinitive
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, the third “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-FIH-nih-tihv//ə(ɪ)n.ˈfɪ.nə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Inflation
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E’ Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-
voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-FLAY-shihn//ə(ɪ)n.ˈfleiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second stress

Inflict
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/ihn-FLIH[K]-t//ə(ɪ)n.ˈflɪ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and the final “t” acts as a third syllable –

Influence
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “u” is long, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-floo-ihns//ˈɪn.flu.ə(ɪ)ns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Influenced
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “u” is long, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the second “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-floo-ihn-st/ – /ɪn.flu.ə(ɪ)n.st/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Inform
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and the “o” is long

/ihn-FOHRM//ə(ɪ)n.ˈfoɹm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Informal
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-FOHR-məl//ə(ɪ)n.ˈfoɹ.məl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Information
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” disappears, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-f’r-MAY-shihn//ˌɪn.fɚ.ˈmeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable  –

Informed
 – For this word, the “I” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is long, and since the root-word ends with the letter “m”, then the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

– /ihn-FOHRM-d//ə(ɪ)n.ˈfoɹm.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable –

Infrastructure
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /IHN-fruh-schruk-ch’r//ˈɪn.fɹə(ʌ).stʃʌk.tʃəɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Ing

Ingredient
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-GREE-dee-ihn-[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈgɹiː.ɾiː.ə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable –

Ingredients
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihn-GREE-dee-ihn-ts//ə(ɪ)n.ˈgɹiː.ɾiː.ə(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a fifth syllable

Inh

Inhabitant
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihn--bih-tihn-[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈhæ.bə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

Inhabitants
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihn--bih-tihn-[t]s//ə(ɪ)n.ˈhæ.bə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)n.[t]s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a fifth syllable

Inherent
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ihn-HAYR-ihn-[t]/ – /ɪn.ˈheɪɹ.ə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Inherit
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ihn-HAYR-ih[t]/ – /ɪn.ˈheɪɹ.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Inheritance
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihn-HAYR-ih-tihn-s//ə(ɪ)n.ˈheɪɹ.ə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fifth syllable

Inherited
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is an i-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihn-HAYR-ih-tih[d]/ – /ɪn.ˈheɪɹ.ə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Ini

Inimitable
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, the third “i” is an i-scwha, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-IH-mih-duh-bəl/ – /ə(ɪ)n.ˈnɪ.mə(ɪ).də(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Initial
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the “-tial” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ih-NIH-shəl//ə(ɪ).ˈnɪʃəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Initially
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, for the “-tial” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the first “l” merges with the “-ly” suffix, then the “ll” combination is pronounced like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/ih-NIH-shə-lee//ə(ɪ)ˈnɪ.ʃə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Initiate
 – For this word, the “I” turns into an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /ih-NIH-shee-yay-dih[d]//ə(ɪ).ˈnɪ.ʃiː.je.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Initiated
 – For this word, the “I” turns into an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /ih-NIH-shee-yay-dih[d]//ə(ɪ).ˈnɪ.ʃiː.je.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Initiative
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short the “t” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “i” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the consonant “y”, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ih-NIH-shyuh-tihv//ə(ɪ).ˈnɪ.ʃjə(ʌ).tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Inj

Injure
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/IHN-dʒ’r//ˈɪn.dʒɚɾ/– Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Injured
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “u” disappears, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/IHN-dʒ’r-[d]//ˈɪn.dʒɚ.[ɾ]/– Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Injuries
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “u” disappears, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/IHN-dʒ’r-eez//ˈɪn.dʒɚ.iːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Injury
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “u” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/IHN-dʒ’r-ee//ˈɪn.dʒɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ink

Ink
 – For this word, the “I” is short, and the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it)

/ing-k//ˈɪŋk/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Inl

Inlet
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/IHN-lih[t]/ – /ˈɪn.lə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Inn

Innate
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-AY[T]//ə(ɪ)nˈe[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Inner
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IH-n’r// ˈɪ.nɚ/– Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Innocent
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is soft, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /IHN-uh-sihn-[t]//ˈɪn.ə(ʌ).sə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Innovate
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounce simply as a single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-uh-vay[t]/ – /ˈɪn.ə(ʌ).ve[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Innovation
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-uh-VAY-shihn/ – /ɪn.ə(ʌ).ˈveiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Innovative
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /IHN-uh-vay-dihv//ɪn.ə(ʌ).ve.ɾə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Ino

Inordinate
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-OHR-dih-nih[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈoɹ.də(ɪ).nə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Ins

Insect
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/IHN-seh[k]-t//ˈɪn.sɛ[k].t / – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable –

Inseparable (in-Separate-able)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” is short, the first “a” disappears, the second “a” combines with the “-able” suffix, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-SEHP-ruh-bəl//ə(ɪ)n.ˈsɛp.ɹə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Insert (noun)
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “e” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped)

/IHN-s’r-[t]//ˈɪn.sɚ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Insert (verb)
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ihn-S’R-[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈsɚ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Inside (in-Side)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/ihn-SAI[D]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈsaiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Insight (in-Sight)
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “igh” is pronounced like in the words “night” or “fight” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /IHN-sigh[t]/ – /ˈɪn.sʌiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Insist
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-SIHS-[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈsɪs.[t] / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Insists
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihn-SIHS-ts//ə(ɪ)n.ˈsɪs.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

Inspiration
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the second “i” disappears, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-sp’r-AY-shihn//ˌə(ɪ)n.ˈspɚ.eiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Inspired
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ire” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihn-SPIGH-yr-[d]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈspʌiː.jɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Inspiring
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-SPIGH-yr-ing//ɪn.ˈspʌiː.jɚ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Instagram
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is hard, and the second “a” is short

/IHN-stuh-græm//ˈɪn.stə(ʌ).gɹæm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Install
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l”

/ihn-STAWL//ə(ɪ)n.ˈstɔl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Instance
 – For this word, the “I” is short, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /IHN-stihn-s//ɪn.stə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

Instant
 – For this word, the “I” is short, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-stihn-[t]//ˈɪn.stə(ɪ)n.t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Instead
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihn-STEH[D]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈstɛ[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Instigate
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-stih-gay[t]//ˈɪn.stə(ɪ).ge[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Institute
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “u” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/IHN-stih-too[t]//ˈɪn.stə(ɪ).tu[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Institution
– For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “u” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-stih-TOO-shihn//ˌɪn.stə(ɪ).ˈtu.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Institutions
– For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “u” is long, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ihn-stih-TOO-shihn-z//ˌɪn.stə(ɪ).ˈtu.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

Institutionalized
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “u” is long, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/ihn-stih-TOO-shihn-əl-aiz-[d]/ – /ˌɪn.stə(ɪ).ˈtu.ʃə(ɪ)n.əl.aiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable, that the major stress is on the third syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a seventh syllable –

Instruct
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ihn-s-CHRUHK-[t]//ə(ɪ)n.s.ˈtʃɹʌk.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Instruction
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-s-CHRUHK-shihn//ə(ɪ)n.s.ˈtʃɹʌk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Instructor
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and the final “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-s-CHRUHK-t’r//ə(ɪ)n.s.ˈtʃɹʌk.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Instrument
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination, the “u” is a u-schwa, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-s-chruh-mihn-[t]//ˈɪn.s.tʃɹə(ʌ).mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

Insubordination
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “u” is a u-schwa, “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihn-suh-bohr-dih-NAY-shuhn//ˌɪn.sə(ʌ).ˌboɹ.ɾə(ɪ).ˈneiː.ʃə(ʌ)n/ – Notice also that there are minor stresses on the first and third syllables and that the major stress is on the fifth syllable –

Insult
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “u” is a u-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/IHN-suhl-[t]//ˈɪn.sə(ʌ)l.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Insulting
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “u” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue

/ihn-SUHL-ting//ə(ɪ)n.ˈsʌl.tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Insurance
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihn-SH’R-ihn-s//ɪn.ˈsəɹ.ə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Insure
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/ihn-SH’R//ɪn.ʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Insurers
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, there is a extra phantom “r” in-between the first “r” and the letter “e” (this is a product of the two “r” sounds right next to each other.  The phantom-R is pronounced like the letter “R” when it is at the beginning of a word)the “e” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ihn-SH’R-r’r-z//ɪn.ʃɚ.rɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Int

Integral
 – There are two pronunciations of this word, for the first pronunciation, the “I” is an i-schwa, and the “e” is short – for the second pronunciation, the “I” is short, and the “e” turns into a true-schwa – and for both pronunciations, the “g” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-TEH-grəl//ə(ɪ)nˈtɛ.gɹəl/ – Or – /IHN-tə-grəl//ˈɪn.tə.gɹəl/ – Notice that the pronunciation changes depending on which stress is used –

Integrate
 – There are two pronunciations of this word, the “I” is short, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-tə-gray[t]//ˈɪn.tə.geɹ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Integrated
 – There are two pronunciations of this word, the “I” is short, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” combines with the “-ed” ending (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ed” ending, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/IHN-tə-gray-dih[d]//ˈɪn.tə.gɹe.ɾə(ɪ)ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Integrity
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-TEH-grih-dee/ – /ɪn.ˈtɛ.gɹə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Intellectual
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihn-tə.LEH[K]-choo-əl/ – /ə(ɪ)n.tə.ˈlɛk.tʃu.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Intelligence
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-TEH-lih-dʒihn-s//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtɛ.lə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

Intelligent
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-TEH-lih-dʒihn-[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtɛ.lə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)n-[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

Intend
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/ihn-TEHN-[d]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtɛn.[d] / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Intended
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, and since the root-word ends with the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihn-TEHN-dih[d]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtɛn.də(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Intent
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ihn-TEHN-[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Intention
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-TEHN-shihn//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtɛn.shin/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Interact (inter-Act)
– For this word, the “I” turns into an i-schwa, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “a” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/ihn-t’r-æ[k]T//ə(ɪ)n.tɚ.ˈæ[k]t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Interactive (inter-Act-ive)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “a” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-t’r-æK-tihv//ə(ɪ)n.tɚ.ˈæk.tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Interest
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the following “e” disappearing, making the next sound the letter “r” directly after it), the first “e” disappears, and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-chrihs-[t]//ˈɪn.tʃɹə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable –

Interested
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the following “e” disappearing, making the next sound the letter “r” which is directly after it), the first “e” disappears, and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/IHN-chrihs-tih[d]//ˈɪn.tʃɹə(ɪ)s.tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Interesting (#1)
 – This word has two common pronunciations.  This first one is more logical but used less often.  For this version, the “I is short, the first “e” disappears, for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue

/IHN-t’r-ehs-ting/ – /ˈɪn.tɚ.ɛs.tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Interesting (#2)
 – This word has two common pronunciations.  This second one is less logical but used more often.  For this version, the “I is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the following “e” disappearing, making the next sound the letter “r” which is directly after it), the first “e” disappears, for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-chrihs-ting/ – /ˈɪn.tʃɹə(ɪ)s.tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Interests
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the following “e” disappearing, making the next sound the letter “r” which is directly after it), the first “e” disappears, and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-chrihs-ts//ˈɪn.tʃɹə(ɪ)s.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable –

Interfere
– For this word, the “I” is short, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is long, the third “e” is silent

/ihn-t’r-FEER//ˌɪn.tɚ.ˈfiːɹ/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

Interferes
– For this word, the “I” is short, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is long, the third “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ihn-t’r-FEER-z//ˌɪn.tɚ.ˈfiːɹ.z/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable, that the major stress is on the third syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Interior
 – For this word, the first “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is long, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the another), and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-TEER-ee-yr//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtiːɹ.iː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Intermediate (inter-Mediate)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-t’r-MEE-dee-ih[t]//ɪn.tɚ.ˈmiː.ɾiː.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Intern
– For this word, the “I” is short, and for the “-ern” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-t’rn/ – /ˈɪn.tɚɹn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Internal
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ern” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-T’R-nəl//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtɚ.nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

International (inter-National)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” disappears, the “a” is short, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-t’r-.shih.nəl//ə(ɪ)n.tɚ.ˈnæ.ʃə(ɪ).nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Internationalization (inter-National-ize-ation)
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “e” disappears, the “a” is short, for the first “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the third “i” is long, the third “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the second “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-t’r--shih-nəl-ai-ZAY-shihn//ˌə(ɪ)n.tɚ.ˈnæ.ʃə(ɪ).nəl.aiː.ˈzeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stresses on the first syllable and that there are major stresses on the third and seventh syllables –

Internet (inter-Net)
– For this word, the “I” is short, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/IHN-t’r-neh[t]//ˈɪn.tɚ.nɛ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Internship
– For this word, the “I” is short, for the “-ern” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ship” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “p” is (often)
stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-t’rn-shih[p]//ˈɪn.tɚn.ʃə(ɪ)[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Interpersonal (inter-Personal)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” disappears, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-t’r-P’R-sə.nəl//ˌə(ɪ)n.tɚˈpɚ.sə.nəl/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Interpret
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” disappears, and the last “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /ihn-T’R-prih[t]/ – /ə(ɪ)n.ˈtɚ.pɹə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Interpretation
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-t’r-prih-TAY-shihn//ə(ɪ)n.ˌtɚ.pɹə(ɪ).ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n /– Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Interrupt
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped

/ihn-t’r-UH[P]-t//ˌə(ɪ)n.ˈtɚ.ʌ[p].t / – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable, that the major stress is on the third syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Interruption
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-t’r-UH[P]-shihn//ˌə(ɪ)n.tɚ.ˈʌ[p].ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Intersect
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

– /ihn-t’r-SEH[K]-[t]/ – /ɪn.tɚ.ˈsɛ[k].[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Intertwined (inter-Twined)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” disappears, the second “i” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “n”, the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/ihn-t’r-TWAIN-[d]//ə(ɪ)n.tɚ.ˈtwaiːn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Interval
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “e” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-t’r-vəl//ˈɪn.tɚ.vəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Intervening
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-t’r-VEE-ning/ – /ə(ɪ)n.tɚ.ˈviː.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Interview (inter-View)
– For this word, the “I” is short, the first “e” disappears, the “iew” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”

/IHN-t’r-vyoo//ˈɪn.tɚ.vju/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Interviewee (inter-View-ee)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” disappears, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and then the final “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-t’r-vyoo-WEE//ˌə(ɪ)n.tɚ.vju.ˈwiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

Interviewing (inter-View-ing)
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “e” disappears, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /IHN-t’r-vou-wing//ˈɪn.tɚ.vju.wɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Intimate
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-tih-mih[t]/ – /ˈɪn.tiː.mə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Intimidating
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, the third “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-TIH-mih-day-ding//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtɪ.mə(ɪ).de.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Into – For this word, the “I” is short, and the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”

/IHN-too//ˈɪn.tu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Intonation (in-Tone-ation)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-toh-NAY-shihn//ə(ɪ)n.toh.ˈNAY.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Intoxicated
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a True Long A, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” of the “-ed” ending is an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ihn-TOKS-ih-kay-dih[d]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtɑks.ə(ɪ).ke.ɾə(ɪ)ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Intranet (intra-Net)
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/IHN-chruh-neh[t]//ˈɪn.tʃɹə(ʌ).nɛ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Intransigence
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-CHRæN-zih-dʒihn-s//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtʃɹæn.zə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

Intrigue
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “g” is hard, the “ue” combination is silent

/IHN-chreeg//ˈɪn.tʃɹiːg/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Intriguing
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “g” is hard, the “u” is silent, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-CHREE-ging//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtʃɹiː.gɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Intrinsic
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination, the second “i” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the third “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/ihn-CHRIHN-zi[k]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtʃɹɪn.zə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Intro
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “o” is long

/IHN-chroh/ – /ˈɪn.tʃɹo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Introduce
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/ihn-chrə-DOOS/ – /ə(ɪ)n.tʃɹə.ˈdus/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Introduced
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, the “c” is soft, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the soft letter “c” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/ihn-chrə-DOOST/ – /ə(ɪ)n.tʃɹə.ˈdust/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Introduction
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ihn-chrə-DUHK-shihn//ˌə(ɪ)n.tʃɹə.ˈdʌk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

Introductions
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-chrə-DUHK-shihn-z//ˌə(ɪ)n.tʃɹə.ˈdʌk.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable, that the major stress is on the third syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

Intrusive
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-CHROO-sihv//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtʃɹu.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Intuit
 – For this word, the “I” turns into an i-schwa, the “u” is long, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ihn-TOO-ih[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈtu.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Intuition
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “u” is long, the second “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-too-IH-shihn//ə(ɪ)n.tu.ˈɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Inu

Inuit
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/IHN-you-ih[t]//ˈɪn.ju.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Inv

Invent
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ihn-VEHN-[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈvɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Invention
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-VEHN-shihn//ə(ɪ)n.ˈvɛn.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Inventory
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and for “-ory” suffix – the “o” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHN-vihn-tohr-ee//ˈɪn.və(ɪ)n.toɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Invest
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/ihn-VEHS[T]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈvɛs[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Investigate
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-VEHS-tih-gay[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈvɛs.tə(ɪ).ge[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Investigation
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-vehs-tih-GAY-shihn//ˌə(ɪ)n.vɛs.tə(ɪ).ˈgeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/– Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Investment
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “e” is short, the first “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-VEHS[T]-mihnt//ə(ɪ)n.ˈvɛs[t].mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Investor
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is short, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-VEHS-t’r//ə(ɪ)n.ˈvɛs.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Invitation
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-vih-TAY-shihn//ə(ɪ)n.və(ɪ).ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Invite (noun)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/IHN-vigh[t]//ˈɪn.vʌiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Invite (verb)
– For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/ihn-VIGH[T]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈvʌiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Invoice
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, the “c” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/IHN-voys//ˈɪn.voiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Invoices
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, the “c” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/IHN-voy-sih-z//ˈɪn.voiː.sə(ɪ).z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Involve
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/ihn-VAWL-v//ə(ɪ)n.ˈvɔl.v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the final “v” acts as a third syllable

Involved
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is pronounced like an “aw” combination, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “v” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /ihn-VAWL-v-[d]//ɪn.ˈvɔl.v.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Involvement
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the first “e” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihn-VAWL-v-mihn-[t]//ə(ɪ)n.ˈvɔl.v.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable –

Io

Iowa
 – For this word, the “I” is long, the “o” is long (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”), and the “a” turns into a u-schwa

/AI-oh-wuh//ˈaiː.o.wə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Ip

iPad
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced as the name of the letter “i”, the “a” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /AI-pæ[d]/ – /ˈaiː.pæ[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

iPod
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced as the name of the letter “i”, the “o” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/AI-pah[d]/ – /ˈaiː.pɑ[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Iq

IQ
 – For this acronym (as with all acronyms that do not spell a discernible word), each letter is pronounced as the name of each individual letter

– /ai-kyou/ – /aiː.kju/ –

Ir

Irate
 – For this word, the “I” is long, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ai-RAY[T]/ – /aiː.ˈɹe[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Ireland
– For this word, the “I” is pronounced the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “I” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “e” disappears, and for the “-land” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IGH-y’r-lihn-[d]//ˈʌiː.jɚ.lə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable –

Iron
 – For this word, the “I” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “I” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to another), and the “o” disappears

– /IGH-yrn//ˈʌiː.jɚn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Ironed
 – For this word, the “I” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “I” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to another), the “o” disappears, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” si (sometimes) stopped

/IGH-yrn-[d]//ˈʌiː.jɚn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Ironically
 – For this word, the “I” is long, the “o” is short, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ai-RAH-nihk-lee//aiː.ˈɹɑ.nɪk.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Ironing
 – For this word, the “I” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “I” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to another), the “o” disappears, and “-ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /IGH-yr-nign//ˈʌiː.jɚ.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Irregularities (ir-Regular-ities)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the “g” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ih-reh-gyoo-LAYR-ih-deez//ə(ɪ).ˌɹɛ.gju.ˈleɪɹ.ə(ɪ).ɾiːz/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

Irregularity (ir-Regular-ity)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the “g” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ih-reh-gyoo-LAYR-ih-dee//ə(ɪ).ˌɹɛ.gju.ˈleɪɹ.ə(ɪ).ɾə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

Irrelevant (ir-Relevant)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ih-REH-lih-vihn[t]//ə(ɪ).ˈɹɛ.lə(ɪ).və(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Irritate
 – For this word, the “I” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EER-ih-tay[t]//ˈiːɹ.ə(ɪ).te[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Irritated
 – For this word, the “I” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” (even if it is stopped) – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

/EER-ih-tay-dih[d]//ˈiːɹ.ə(ɪ).te.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Irritating
 – For this word, the “I” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/EER-ih-tay-ding//iːɹ.ə(ɪ).te.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Irving
 – For this name, the “I” disappears, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/R-ving//ˈɚ.vɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Is

Is
 – For this word, the “I” is short, and the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

– /ihz//ɪz/

ISIS
 – For this acronym, since we can pronounce it as a name, the “I” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the second “I” turns into an i-schwa

– /IGH-sihs//ˈʌiː.sə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Islam
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

– /ihs-LAHM//ɪs.ˈlɑm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Island
 – For this word, the “I” is long, the “s” is silent, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

– /Ai-lihn[d]//ˈaiː.lə(ɪ)n[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Islands
 – For this word, the “I” is long, the “s” is silent, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced (almost) like the letter “z”

– /Ai-lihn-dz//ˈaiː.lə(ɪ)n.dz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “dz” ending acts as a separate syllable –

Isolated
 – For this word, the “I” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /IGH-suh-lay-dih[d]//ʌiː.sə(ʌ).le.ɾə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Isolating
 – For this word, the “I” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/igh-sə-LAY-ding//ʌiː.sə.ˈle.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Isolation
 – For this word, the “I” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/igh-sə-LAY-shihn//ʌiː.sə.ˈleiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Issue
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “ue” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”

/IH-shyou//ˈɪ.ʃju/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Issues
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “ue” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

– /IH-shyouz//ˈɪ.ʃjuz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

ISUS
 – For this acronym, since we can pronounce it as a name, the “I” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the “U” turns into an i-schwa

– /IGH-sihs//ˈʌiː.sə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

It

It
 – For this word, the “I” is short, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/ih[t]//ˈɪ[t]/

It’ll
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, there is Phantom-Schwa in-between the “t” and the “ll” combination (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/IH-dəl//ˈɪ.ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Italian
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “a” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the second “a” turns into an i-schwa

/ih-TæL-ee-ihn/ – /ə(ɪ).ˈtæl.iː.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Italians
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “a” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/ih-TæL-ee-ihnz/ – /ə(ɪ).ˈtæl.iː.ə(ɪ)nz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Italicized
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “a” is short, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “c” is soft (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, the “e” merges with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/ih--lih-saiz-[d]//ə(ɪ).ˈtæ.lə(ɪ).saiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

Italics
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “a” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ai--lihk-s/ – /aiː.ˈtæ.lə(ɪ)k.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Italy
 – For this word, the “I” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/IH-də-lee//ˈɪ.ɾə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Item
 – For this word, the “I” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “e” turns into an true-schwa

/IGH-dihm//ˈʌiː.ɾəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Items
 – For this word, the “I” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” (usually) turns into a flap-d, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/IGH-dəmz//ˈʌiː.ɾəmz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Itineraries
 – For this word, the “I” is long, the second “i” is short, the “e” disappears, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ai-TIH-n’r-ayr-eez//aiː.ˈtɪ.nɚ.eɪɹ.iːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Its/’s
 – For these words, the “I” is short

/ih-ts//ɪ.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable –

Itself
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped,  and the “e” is short

/ih[t]-SEHL-f//ə(ɪ)[t].ˈsɛl.f/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter I ) –


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