– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter I:  Im ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Im

 

Ic . Id . If . Ig . Il . Ina-Inm . Inn-Inz . Ip . Iq . Ir . Is . It

 

Image
– For this word, the “I” is short, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IH-mihdʒ//ˈɪ.mə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Images
– For this word, the “I” is short, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and since the word is plural – the “e” merges with the “es” ending and turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/IH-mih-dʒihz//ˈɪ.mə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Imaginary
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “a” is short, the “g” is soft, the second “i” is and i-schwa, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ih--dʒih-nayr-ee//ə(ɪ).ˈmæ.dʒə(ɪ).neɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Imagination
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the first “a” is short, the “g” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ih--dʒih-NAY-shihn//ə(ɪ).ˌmæ.dʒə(ɪ).ˈneiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Imaginative
– For this word, the “I” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is short, the “g” is soft, the second “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ih--dʒih-nuh-tihv//ə(ɪ).ˈmæ.dʒə(ɪ).nə(ʌ).tɪv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Imagine
– For this word, the “I” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is short, the “g” is soft, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/ih--dʒihn//ə(ɪ).ˈmæ.dʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Imitate
– For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” s silent

/SAI-lihn-[t]//ˈsaiː.lə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Immediately
– For this word, the “I” turns into an i-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ih-MEE-dee-ih[t]-lee//ə(ɪ).ˈmiː.ɾiː.ə(ɪ)[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Immerse
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/ih-M’R-s//ə(ɪ).ˈmɚ.s / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Immersed
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” disappears, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/ih-M’R-st//ə(ɪ).ˈmɚ.st / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Immersion
– For this word, the “I” turns into an i-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” disappears, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ih-M’R-zhihn//ə(ɪ).ˈmɚ.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Immoral (im-Moral)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ih-MOHR-əl//ə(ɪ).ˈmoɹ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Immune
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the final “e” is silent

/ih-MYOON//ə(ɪ).ˈmjun/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Immunologist
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the first “o” is short, the second “o” is a true-schwa, the “g” is soft, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ih-myoo-NAH-lə-dʒihs[t]//ə(ɪ).mju.ˈnɑ.lə.dʒə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Impact (noun & verb)
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “a” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped

/IHM-pæ[k]-t//ˈɪm.pæ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Impatience (im-Patience)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “ti” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/ihm-PAY-shihn-s//ɪm.ˈpeiː.ʃɪn.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Impatient (im-Patient)
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “ti” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ihm-PAY-shihn-[t]//ɪm.ˈpeiː.ʃɪn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Imperialism
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “e” is long, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-PEER-ee-yuh-lih-zəm//ə(ɪ)m.ˈpiːɹ.iː.jə(ʌ).lə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Implant
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/ihm-PLæN-[t]//ɪm.ˈplæn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Implement
– For this word, the “I” is short, the first “e” turns into an true-schwa, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the
final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/IHM-plə-mihn-[t]//ˈɪm.plə.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the final “t” (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Implementation
– For this word, the “I” is short, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-plə-mehn-TAY-shihn//ˌɪm.plə(ʌ).mə(ɪ)n.ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress is on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Implication
– For this word, the “I” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-plih-KAY-shihn//ˌɪm.plə(ɪ)ˈkeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Imply
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/ihm-PLAI//ə(ɪ)mˈplaiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Impolite
 – For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the second “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/ihm-puh-LIGH[T]//ə(ɪ)m.pə(ʌ).ˈlʌiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Import (noun)
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/IHM-pohr-[t]//ˈɪm.poɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a thirds syllable

 

Importance
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is long, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-POHR-tihn-s//ˈə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Important
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the first “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-POHR-[t]ihn-[t]//ə(ɪ)m.ˈpoɹ.[t]ə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Impose
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/ihm-POHZ//ə(ɪ)mˈpoz / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Impossible
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “o” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ible” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-PAH-sih-bəl//ə(ɪ)m.ˈpɑ.sə(ɪ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Impress
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-PREHS//ə(ɪ)mˈpɹɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Impressed
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/ihm-PREHS-[t]//ə(ɪ)m.ˈpɹɛs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Impression
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa,, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination merges with the “-sion” suffix, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-PREH-shihn//ə(ɪ)m.ˈpɹɛ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Impressive
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa,, and for the “-press” suffix – the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-PREH-sihv//ə(ɪ)m.ˈpɹɛ.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Impromptu
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is short, the second “p” is (often) stopped, and the “u” is long

/ihm-PRAHM[P]-too//ə(ɪ)m.ˈpɹɑm[p].tu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Improper
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-PRAH-p’r//ə(ɪ)m.ˈpɹɑ.pɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Improve
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the final “e” is silent

/ihm-PROOV//ə(ɪ)m.ˈpɹuv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Improved
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “v” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/ihm-PROOV[D]//ə(ɪ)m.pɹuv[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Improvement
– For this word, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, the first “e” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ihm-PROOV-mihn[t]//ə(ɪ)m.ˈpɹuv.mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Impulse
– For this word, the “I” is short, the “u” is a u-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/IHM-puhl-s//ˈɪm.pʌl.s/ – Notice that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Impulsive
– For this word, the “I” turns into an i-schwa, the “u” is short, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/Ihm-PUHL-sihv//ə(ɪ)m.ˈpʌl.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice that the stress is on the second syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter I ) –


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