– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter K ) –


 

An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Kk

 

Ke . Ki . Kn . Ko

 

Kabul
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the “u” is long

/kuh-BOOL//kə(ʌ).ˈbul/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Karaoke
 – For this word, the first “a” is a “Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is long

/kayr-ee-OH-kee//keɪɹ.iː.ˈo.kiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Kathryn
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “th” combination is un-voiced, and the “y” turns into an i-schwa

/KæTH-rihn//ˈkæθ.ɹə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Kayaking
 – For this word, the first “a” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, the “y” takes the consonant sound, the second “a” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KAI-yæ-king//ˈkaiː.yæ.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ke

Keen
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/keen/ – /kiːn/ –

Keep
 – For this word,the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/kee[p]/ – /kiː[p]/ –

Keg
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “g” is hard but is (often) stopped

/keh[g]//kɛ[g]/

Kegerator
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “g” is hard, the second “e” disappears, the “a” is True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-d, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KEH-g’r-ay-d’r/ – /ˈkɛ.gɚ.e.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Kent
 – For this name, the “e” is short, and since it is a person’s name and because of its similarity to the word “can’t” – the “t” is almost never stopped

– /kehn-t/ – /kɛn.t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Key
 – For this word, the “ey” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/kee/ – /kiː/ –

Keyboard (Key-Board)
– For this word, the “ey” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/KEE-bohr-[d]/ – /ˈkiː.boɹ.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Ki

Kick
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/kih-k/ – /kɪ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable –

Kicked
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) but is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/KIH-[k]-t/ – /ˈkɪ.[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a separate syllable –

Kid
 – For this word the “i” is short, and the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /kih[d]/ – /kɪ[ɾ]/ –

Kill
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/kihl/ – /kɪl/ –

Killing
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KIH-ling/ – /ˈkɪ.lɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Kilogram (kilo-Gram)
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is hard, and the “a” is short

/KIH-luh-græm/ – /ˈkɪ.lə(ʌ).gɹæm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Kilometer (kilo-Meter)
– For this word, there are two accepted pronunciations –

For The First: the “i” is an i-schwa, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the first “e” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and the second “e” disappears

For The Second:  the “i” is short, the “o” is short, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the second “e” disappears

– /KIH-lə-mee-d’r/– /ˈkɪ.lə.miː.ɾɚ/–
– Or–
– /kih-LAH-mih-d’r/ – /kə(ɪ).ˈlɑ.mə(ɪ).ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress changes location depending on the pronunciation –

Kind
 – For this word, the “i” is long

– /kain-d//kaiːn.d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

Kindergarten
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the first “e” disappears, the “g” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the second “e” turns into an i-schwa

/KIHN-d’r-gahr-dihn//ˈkɪn.dɚ.gɑɹ.ɾə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Kindly
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “d” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /KAIN-[d]-lee//ˈkaiːn.[d].liː/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

Kindness
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “d” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /KAIN-[d]-nihs//ˈkaiːn.[d].nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Kinesthetic
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “th” combination in un-voiced, the second “e” is short, the the second “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa and the “c” is hard, but is (often) stopped

/kih-nehs-THEH-dih[k]//kə(ɪ).nə(ɪ)s.ˈθɛ.ɾə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

King
 – For this word, the “ing” combination is pronounce like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/king/ – /kɪŋ/ –

Kiss
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/kihs//kɪs/

Kitchen
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KIH-chihn//ˈkɪ.tʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Kitten
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “t” but is (usually) stopped (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/KIH’-ihn//ˈkɪ.ʔə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Kn

Knee
 – For this word, the “K” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of the “kn” combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/nee//niː/

Knew
– For this word, the “K” (this is the standard pronunciation of the “kn” combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ew” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”

/noo//nu/

Knife
 – For this word, the “K” (this is the standard pronunciation of the “kn” combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/nighf//nʌiːf/ – Notice also that the “f” ending acts as a second syllable

Knit
 – For this word, the “K” (this is the standard pronunciation of the “kn” combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/nih[t]//nɪ[t]/

Knitted
 – For this word, the “K” (this is the standard pronunciation of the “kn” combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d

/NIH-dihd//ˈnɪ.ɾə(ɪ)ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Knitting
 – For this word, the “K” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of the “kn” combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/NIH-ding//ˈnɪ.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Knives
 – For this word, the “K” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of the “kn” combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/nigh-vz//nʌiː.vz/ – Notice also that the “vs” ending acts as a separate syllable

Knock
 – For this word, the “K” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of the “kn” combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/nah-k//nɑk/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Knot
 – For this word, the “K” (this is the standard pronunciation of the “kn” combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is short, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/nah[t]//nɑ[t]/

Know
 – For this word, the “K” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of the “kn” combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”)

– /noh//no/

Knowledge
 – For this word, the “K” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of the “kn” combination in The Common Tongue), the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “dg” combination is pronounced simply like the single soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

– /NAH-lihdʒ/ – /ˈnɑ.lə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Knowledgeable (Knowledge-able)
– For this word, the “K” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of the “kn” combination in The Common Tongue), the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “dg” combination is pronounced simply like the single soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is silent, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /NAH-lidʒ-ə-bəl//ˈnɑ.lə(ɪ)dʒ.ə.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Known
 – For this word, the “K” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of the “kn” combination in The Common Tongue), the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”)

/nohn//non/

Ko

Korea
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “e” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/kuh-REE-yuh//kə(ʌ).ˈɹiː.jə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Korean
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “e” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “a” turns into an i-schwa

/kuh-REE-yihn//kə(ʌ).ˈɹiː.jə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter K ) –


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