– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter L:  Le ) –


 

An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Le

 

La . Li . Lo . Lu

 

Lead (past-tense verb or noun)
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/leh[d]//lɛ[ɾ]/ –

 

Lead (present-tense verb or noun)
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/lee[d]//liː[ɾ]/ –

 

Leader
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LEE-d’r//ˈliː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Leadership
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ship” suffix – the “sh” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is an
i-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LEE-d’r//ˈliː.ɾɚ.ʃə(ɪ)[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Leading
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LEE-ding//ˈliː.dɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Leaf
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/leef//liːf/

 

League
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “g” is hard, and the final “ue” combination is silent

/leeg//liːg/

 

Leak
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/lee[k]//liːk/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Leakage
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/LEE-kih-dʒ//ˈliː.kə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Leakages
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” combines with the “-es” ending, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/LEE-kih-dʒihz//ˈliː.kə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Leaked
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “k” is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/lee[k]-t//liː[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Lean
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/leen//liːn/

 

Leap
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/lee[p]//liː[p]/

 

Leaped
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “p” is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “p” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/lee[p]-t//liː[p].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Learn
– For this word, the “ea” combination disappears

/l’rn//lɚn/

 

Learned
– For this word, the “ea” combination disappears, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/l’rn-d//lɚn.d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Lease
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/lees//liːs/

 

Leasing
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LEE-sing//ˈliː.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Least
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/lees-[t]//liːs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Leather
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “th” combination is voiced, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LEH-th’r//ˈlɛ.ðɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Leave
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “e” is silent

/leev//liːv/

 

Lecture
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LEH[K]-ch’r//ˈlɛk.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Left
– For this word, the “e” is short

/lehf-[t]//lɛf.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Leg
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the “g” is hard

/lehg//lɛg/

 

Legal
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “g” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LEE-gəl//ˈliː.gəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Legend
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “g” is soft, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/LEH-dʒihn-[d]//ˈlɛ.dʒə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Legendary
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “g” is soft, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LEH-dʒihn-dayr-ee//ˈlɛ.dʒə(ɪ)n.deɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Legislation
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “g” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/leh-dʒihs-LAY-sh’n//lɛ.dʒɪs.ˈleiː.ʃən/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Leisure
– For this word, the “ei” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-sure” suffix – the “s” is pronounced like voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LEE-zh’r//ˈliː.ʒɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Legitimate
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is soft, the first “i” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “i” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/lə-dʒIH-dih-mih[t]//lə.ˈdʒɪ.ɾə(ɪ).mə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Lemon
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/LEH-mihn//ˈlɛ.mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Lend
– For this word, the “e” is short

/lehn-d//lɛn.d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Length
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination, the “g” is pronounced like the letter “k” (pronounced separately from the letter “n”), and the final “th” combination is un-voiced

/lehng-kth//lɛŋ.kθ/ – Notice also that the “kth” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Lenient
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/LEE-nee-ihn-[t]//ˈliː.niː.ə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Less
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/lehs//lɛs/

 

Lesson
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/LEH-sihn//ˈlɛ.sə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Lessons
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/LEH-sihn-z//ˈlɛ.sə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllables

 

Let
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/leh[t]//lɛ[t]/

 

Letter
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LEH-d’r//ˈlɛ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Level
– For this word, the first “e” is short, and the second “e” turns into a true-schwa

/LEH-vəl//ˈlɛ.vəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Levels
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”Lenient – For this word, – // – / ˈ / – Notice also that the stress is –

/LEH-vəl-z//ˈlɛ.vəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Levi
– For this name, the “e” is long, and the “i” is long

/LEE-vai//ˈliː.vaiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Levied
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/LEH-vee[d]//ˈlɛ.viː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Levy
– For this name, the “e” is short, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/LEH-vee//ˈlɛ.viː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter L ) –


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