– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter L:  Li ) –


 

An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Li

 

La . Le . Lo . Lu

 

Liable
– For this word, the first “i” is long, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is due to the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/LAI-uh-bəl//laiː.ə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Liability
– For this word, the first “i” is long, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/lai-uh-BIHL-ih-dee//laiː.ə(ʌ).bɪ.lɪ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Libel
– For this word, the “i” is long, and the “e” turns into a true-schwa

/LAI-bəl//ˈlaiː.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Liberties
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the first “e” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/LIH-b’r-deez//ˈlɪ.bɚ.ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Liberty
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the first “e” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/LIH-b’r-dee//ˈlɪ.bɚ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Library
– For this word, the “i” is long, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LAI-brayr-ee//ˈlaiː.bɹeɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Libya
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “y” and the “a” (this is a product of transitioning from one sound to the next), and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/LIH-bee-yuh//ˈlɪ.biː.jə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

License
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced almos like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/LIGH-sihn-z//ˈlʌiː.sə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Licensing
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LIGH-sihn-zing//ˈlʌiː.sə(ɪ)n.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Lid
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/lih[d]//lɪ[ɾ]/

 

Lie
– For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/lai//laiː/

 

Life
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/lighf//lʌiːf/

 

Lifeless (Life-less)
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the first “e” is silent, and for the “-less” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LIGHF-lihs//ˈlʌiːl.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Lift
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/lihf-[t]//lɪf.[t]/ – Notice also that that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Light
– For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “right” or “fight” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ligh-[t]//ˈlʌiː.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Lightly
– For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “right” or “fight” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/LIGH[T]-lee//ˈlʌiː.[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Lightning
– For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “right” or “fight” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is a is (usually) stopped, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LIGH[T]-ning//ˈlʌiː[t].nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Lightweight (light-Weight)
– For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “right” or “fight” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is (often) stopped, the “eigh” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Dipthing (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ligh[t]-way[t]//lʌiː[t].weiː[t]/ – Notice also that there is not discernible major stress in this word. Depending on the sentence it can be in either the first or the second syllable –

 

Likable (Like-able)
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LIGH-kə.bəl//ˈlʌiː.kə.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Like
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “k” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/ligh-[k]//lʌiː.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Liked
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “k” is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/ligh[k]-t//lʌiː[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Likelihood
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “e” is silent, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-hood” suffix – the “h” is pronounced, the “oo” combination turns into a true-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LIGHK-lee-hə[d]//ˈlʌiːk.liː.hə[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Likely
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “e” is silent, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/LIGHK-lee//ˈlʌiːk.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Limelight
– For this word, the first “i” is long, the “e” is silent, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word, “fight” or “right” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/LAIM-ligh[t]//ˈlaiːm.lʌiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Limit
– For this word, the “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/LIH-mih[t]//ˈlɪ.mə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Limitation
– For this word, the “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/lih-mih-TAY-shihn//lɪ.mə(ɪ).ˈte.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Limited
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is(usually) stopped

/LIH-mih-tih[d]//ˈlɪ.mɪ.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Limping
– For this word, the first “i” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LIHM-ping//ˈlɪm.pɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Line
– For this word, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/lain//laiːn/

 

Linear
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “e” and the “a”, and the “a” disappears

/LIH-nee-y’r//ˈlɪ.niː.jr/ – Notice also that the stress is on the stress is on the first syllable

 

Lingering
– For this word, the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination, the “g” is hard (pronounced separately from the “in” combination), for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LING-g’r-ing//ˈlɪŋ.gɚ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Linguist
– For this word, the “-in” combination is pronounced like in the “ing” combination, the “g” is hard (pronounced separately from the “ing” sound of the “in” combination), the “u” is pronounced like the letter “w”, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LING-gwis-[t]//ˈlɪŋ.gwə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

 

Link
– For this word, the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” after it)

/ling-k//lɪŋ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Linkage
– For this word, the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is one of two the standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LING-kih-dʒ//ˈlɪŋ.kə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Linked
– For this word, the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), the “k” is (usually) stopped, and the since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/Ling[k]-t//lɪŋ[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

 

LinkedIn
– For this name, the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), the “k” is (usually) stopped, the “e” is silent, and the second “i” (capitalized because it is the proper name of a business and that is how they chose to represent it) is short

/Ling[k]-dihn//lɪŋ[k].dɪn/ – Notice also that there is no discernible word stress –

 

Lip
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/lih[p]//lɪ[p]/

 

Liquid
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/LIH-kwih[d]//ˈlɪ.kwə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

List
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/lihs-[t]//lɪs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Listen
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “t” is silent, and the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/LIH-sihn//ˈlɪ.sə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Listened
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “t” is silent, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/LIH-sən-[d]//ˈlɪ.sən.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Liter
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LEE-d’r//ˈliː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Literal
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LIH-d’r-əl//ˈlɪ.ɾɚ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Literally
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” disappears, for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa and the “l” combines with the “ly” suffix, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/LIH-d’r-ə-lee//ˈlɪ.ɾɚ.ə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Literary
– For this word, the “i” is short, the first “t” is a flap-t, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LIH-d’r-ayr-ee//ˈlɪ.ɾɚ.eɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Literature
– For this word, the “i” is short, the first “t” is a flap-t, the “e” disappears, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LIH-d’r-uh-ch’r//ˈlɪ.ɾɚ.ə(ʌ).tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Litigate
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LIH-dih-gay[t]//ˈlɪ.ɾə(ɪ).e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Litigation
– For this word, the first “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/lih-dih-GAY-shihn//ˈlə(ɪ).ɾə(ɪ).ˈgeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Litter
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like a single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” disappears

/LIH-d’r//ˈlɪ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Little
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “tt” is pronounced simply like a single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “t” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent

/LIH-dəl//ˈlɪ.ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Livable
– For this word, the “i” is short , and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LIHV-uh-bəl//ˈlɪv.ə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Live (adjective)
– For this word, the “i” is long, and the “e” is silent

/laiv//laiːv/

 

Live (verb)
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the “e” is silent

/lihv//lɪv/

 

Lived
– For this word, the “i” is short, and since the root word ends with the sound of the letter “v”, the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/lihv-[d]//lɪv.[d]/

 

Lively
– For this word, the “i” is long, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LAIV-lee//ˈlaiːv.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Lives (plural noun)
– For this word, the “i” is long, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/laiv-z//laiːv.z/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts almost like a separate syllable

 

Lives (infinitive verb)
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/lihv-z//lɪv.z/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts almost like a separate syllable

 

Living
– For this word, the first “i” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LIH-vihŋ//ˈlɪ.vɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter L ) –


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