– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter L:  Lo ) –


 

An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Lo

 

La . Le . Li . Lu

 

Load
– For this word, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is flap-d but is (often) stopped

/loh[d]//lo[ɾ]/ –

 

Loaded
– For this word, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/loh-dih[d]//ˈlo.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Loan
– For this word, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/lohn//lon/

 

Lobby
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “bb” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “b” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/LAH-bee//ˈlɑ.biː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Lobbyist
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “bb” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “b” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “y” and the “i” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-ist” suffix – and the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LAH-bee-yihs[t]//ˈlɑ.biː.jə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Lobes
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/lohb-z//lob.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Lobster
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “b” is almost stopped, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LAH[B]-st’r//ˈlɑ[b].stɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Local
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “c” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LOH-kəl//ˈlo.kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Locally
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “c” is hard,for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa and the “l” combines with the “ly” suffix, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/LOH-kə-lee//ˈlo.kə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Locate
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LOH-kay[t]//ˈlo.ke[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Located
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “c” is hard, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is is a flap-t, and the final “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/LOH-kay-dih[d]//ˈlo.kaɪ.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Location
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/loh-KAY-shihn//lo.ˈkeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Lock
– For this word, the “o” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/lah-k//lɑ.k/ – Notice also that the “ck” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Locked
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) – however, with the addition of the “-ed” ending – the “k” is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/lah[k]-t//lɑ[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Logged
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “g” but is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “g” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/law[g]-d//lɔ[g].d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Logic
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “g” is soft, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LAH-dʒih[k]//ˈlɑ.dʒə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Logical
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “g” is soft, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LAH-dʒih-kəl//ˈlɑ.dʒə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Logistic
– For this word, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is soft, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/lə-dʒIHS-tihk//lə(ʌ).ˈdʒɪs.tə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Logistics
– For this word, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is soft, the first “i” is short, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/lə-dʒIHS-tih-ks//lə(ʌ).ˈdʒɪs.tə(ɪ).ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

London
– For this word, the first “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the second “o” turns into an i-schwa

/LUHN-dihn//ˈlʌn.də(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Lonely
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is
the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LOHN-lee//ˈlon.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Long
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “ring” or “sing” (This is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/lawŋ//lɔŋ/

 

Longer
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination, the “g” is hard (pronounced separately from the letter “n”), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LAWNG-g’r//ˈlɔŋ.gɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Longitude
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “g” is soft (pronounced separately from the letter “n”), the “i” is an i-schwa, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/LAWN-dʒih-too[d]//ˈlɔn.dʒə(ɪ).tu[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Look
– For this word, the “oo” combination turns into a true-schwa (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/lə-k//lə.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Looked
– For this word, the “oo” combination turns into a true-schwa (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “k” is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” is silent, final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/lə[k]-t//lə[k].t/ –

 

Loofah
– For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ah” combination turns into a u-schwa

/LOO-fuh//ˈlu.fə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Looming
– For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LOO-ming//luˈmɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Loose
– For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/loos//lus/

 

Loosely
– For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LOOS-lee//ˈlus.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Loosen
– For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/loos//lus/

 

Looted
– For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “t” is a flap-t but is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/LOO-[t]-ihd//ˈlu.[ɾ].ə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Lord
– For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/lor-[d]//loɹ.ɾ/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Lorry
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/LOHR-ee//ˈloɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Los Angeles
– For this name, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “A” is short, the “g” is soft, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the second “e” turns into an i-schwa

/laws-æN-dʒə-lihs//lɔs.ˈæn.dʒə.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Lose
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/looz//luz/

 

Losing
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LOO-zing//ˈlu.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Loss
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/laws//lɔs/

 

Losses
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/LAW-sihz//ˈlɔ.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Lost
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/laws-[t]//lɔs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Lot
– For this word, the “o” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/lah-[t]//lɑ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Loud
– For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/low-[d]//lɑu.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Loudly
– For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LOW[D]-lee//ˈlɔ[d].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Lounge
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/LOWN-dʒ//loun.dʒ/ – Notice also that the “g” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Love
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the final “e” is silent

/luhv//lʌv/

 

Lovely
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LUHV-lee//ˈlʌv.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Lover
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LUH-v’r//ˈlʌ.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Lovers
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/LUH-v’r-z//ˈlʌ.vɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Loves
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/luhv-z//lʌv.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Low
– For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”)

/loh//lo/

 

Lower
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “w” is pronounced separately from the letter “o” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of the “ow” combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” disappears

/LOH-w’r//ˈlo.wɚ/ – Notice that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Lowest
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “w” is pronounced separately from the letter “o” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of the “ow” combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LOH-ihs[t]//ˈlo.ə(ɪ)s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Loyal
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “oy” combination, the “y” takes the consonant sound, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LOY-yəl//ˈloiː.jəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter L ) –


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