– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter L:  Lu ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue — a.k.a. — American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in The English Language, with more words added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of The English Language — both world-wide, and through-out America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Lu

 

La . Le . Li . Lo . Ly

 

Luanda
– For this word, the “u” is long, there is a phantom “w” in-between the “u” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/loo-WAHN-duh//lu.ˈwɑn.də(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –  Take The TOEFL iBT Exam in Luanda

 

Lucidity
– For this word, the “u” is long, the “c” is soft, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/loo-SIH-dih-tee//lu.ˈsɪ.ɾə(ɪ).tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Luck
– For this word, the “u” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/luh-k//lʌ.k/ – Notice also that the “ck” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Luckily
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LUH-lih-lee//ˈlʌ.kə(ɪ).liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Lucky
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/LUH-kee//ˈlʌ.kiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Lucrative
– For this word, the “u” is long, the “c” is hard, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LOO-kruh-tihv//ˈlu.kɹə(ʌ).tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Luggage
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LUH-gih-dʒ//ˈlʌ.ɡə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Lukewarm
– For this word, the “u” is long, the “e” is silent, and the “a” is pronounced like the long letter “o”

/look-wohr-m//luk.woɹ.m/ – Notice also that this word is pronounced as if it were two separate words, therefore there is no distinguishable major word-stress –

 

Lump
– For this word, the “u” is short, and the final “p” is (sometimes) stopped

/lum-[p]//ˈlʌm.[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Lunch
– For this word, the “u” is short

/luhn-ch//lʌn.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Lung
– For this word, the “u” is short, and the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/lung//ˈlʌŋ/

 

Lunge
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “n” is pronounced normally (the “g” which follows it does not affect the pronunciation), the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/luhn-dʒ//lʌn.dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Lunging
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “n” is pronounced normally (the “g” which follows it does not affect the pronunciation),the “g” is soft (pronounced separately from the letter “n”), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LUHN-dʒing//ˈlʌn.dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Lure
– For this word, the “u” is long, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “u” and the “r”, and the final “e” is silent

/LOO-ər//ˈlu.əɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Luxurious
– For this word, the first “u” is a u-schwa, the “xu” combination is pronounced like the hard letter “g” combined with the voiced version of the “sh” combination, the second “u” disappears, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/luhg-ZH’R-ee-yihs//lʌg.ˈʒɚ.iː.jə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Luxury
– For this word, the first “u” is short, the “xu” combination is pronounced like the hard letter “g” combined with the voiced version of the “sh” combination, the second “u” disappears, and finally the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/LUHG-zh’r-ee//ˈlʌg.ʒɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

– ( American English PronunciationLetter L ) –


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Aa . Bb . Cc . Dd . Ee . Ff . Gg . Hh . Ii . Jj . Kk . Ll . Mm . Nn . Oo . Pp . Qq . Rr . Ss . Tt . Uu . Vv . Ww . Xx . Yy . Zz
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