– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter L ) –


 

An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Ll

 

Le . Li . Lo . Lu

Lab
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “b” is (often) stopped

/læ[b]/ – /læ[b]/ –

Label
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “e” turns into a true-schwa

– /LAY-bəl//ˈleiː.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Labelled
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/LAY-bəl-[d]//ˈleiː.bəl.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts third syllable

Labeling
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the “-ing” ending is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LAY-bə-ling/ – /ˈleiː.bə.lɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Labor
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /LAY-b’r//ˈleiː.bɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Laboratories
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “o” disappears, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is long, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/LæB-rə-tohr-eez//ˈlæb.ɹə.toɹ.iːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Laboratory
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the “o” disappears, the second “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/LæB-rə-tohr-ee/ – /ˈlæb.ɹə.toɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lack
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/læ-k/ – /læ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable –

Lacking
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced like the letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /-king//ˈlæ.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ladder
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “dd” combination is pronounced simply like a single flap-d (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-d’r//ˈlæ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lady
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/LAY-dee/ – /ˈleiː.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lake
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/lay-k/ – /leiː.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable –

Lamb
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “b” is silent

/læm//læm/

Lamp
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “p” is (often) almost stopped

/læm-[p]/ – /læm.[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Land
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “d” is (often) stopped

/læn-[d]/ – /læn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Landscape
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, and the “d” is (often) stopped, the “c” is hard, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “p” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/LæN[D]-skay[p]/ – /ˈlæn[d].skeiː[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Landscapes
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, and the “d” is (often) stopped, the “c” is hard, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “e” is silent

/LæN[D]-skay-ps/ – /ˈlæn[d].skeiː.ps/ – Notice also that the “ps” ending acts as a third syllable

Landslide (Land-Slide)
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “d” is (often) stopped, the “i” is long, the second “d” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/LæN[D]-slaiː[d]/ – /ˈlæn[d].slaiːn[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lane
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/layn/ – /leiːn/ –

Language
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the hard letter “g” directly after it), the first “g” is hard (pronounced separately from the letter “n”), the “u” is pronounced like the letter “w”, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LæNG-gwihdʒ//ˈlæŋ.gwə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Languish
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the hard letter “g” directly after it), the “g” is hard (pronounced separately from the letter “n”), the “u” is pronounced like the letter “w”, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

/LæNG-gwih-sh/ – /ˈlæŋ.gwə(ɪ).ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “sh” ending acts as a third syllable

Languished
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the hard letter “g” directly after it), the “g” is hard (pronounced separately from the letter “n”), the “u” is pronounced like the letter “w”, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, and since the root-word ends with the “sh” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/LæNG-gwihsh-[t]/ – /ˈlæŋ.gwə(ɪ)ʃ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “sh” combination  and the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Lapel
– For this word, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and the “e” is short

/lə-PEHL//lə.ˈpɛl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Laptop
– For this word, the “a” is short, the first “p” is (usually) stopped, the “o” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/[P]-tah[p]//ˈlæ[p].tɑ[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Large
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced the short letter “o”, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /lahr-dʒ//lɑɹ.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable –

Largely
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is soft, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /LAHRdʒ-lee//ˈlɑɹdʒ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Larger
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is soft, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /LAHR-dʒ’r//ˈlɑɹ.dʒɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Largest
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is soft, and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /LAHR-dʒihs-[t]//ˈlɑɹ.dʒə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Last
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/læs-[t]/ – /læs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Late
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/lay[t]//leiː[t]/

Lately
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/LAY[T]-lee//ˈleiː[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Later
 – For this word, the “a” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LAY-d’r//ˈleiː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lateral
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-d’r-əl//ˈlæ.ɾɚ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Latest
 – For this word, the “a” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /LAY-dihs-[t]//ˈleɪ.ɾə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Latin
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the “i” is an i-schwa

– /[T]-ihn//ˈlæ.[t]ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Latitude
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the first “t” is is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/-dih-too[d]//ˈlæ.ɾə(ɪ).tu[ɾ] / – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Latter
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” disappears

/-d’r//ˈlæ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Laugh
 – For this word, the “au” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “a”, and the final “gh” combination is pronounced like the letter “f”

– /læf//læf/

Laughable
 – For this word, the “au” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “a”, the final “gh” combination is pronounced like the letter “f”, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /-fuh-bəl//ˈlæ.fə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Laughing
 – For this word, the “au” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “a”, the “gh” combination is pronounced like the letter “f”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-fing/ – /ˈlæ.fɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Laughter
 – For this word, the “au” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “a”, the “gh” combination is pronounced like the letter “f”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LæF-t’r/ – /ˈlæf.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Launch
 – For this word, the “au” combination is pronounced like an “aw” combination

– /lawn-ch//lɔn.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable –

Laundromat
 – For this word, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/LAWN-dʒrə-mæ[t]//ˈlɔn.dʒɹə.mæ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lavaliere
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “e” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/læ-və-LEE-y’r//læ.və.ˈliː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Law
 – For this word, the “aw” combination is pronounced like in the word “saw” or “paw” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/law//lɔ/

Laws
 – For this word, the “aw” sound like in the word “saw” or “paw” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /law-z//lɔ.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable –

Lawsuit
 – For this word, the “aw” combination is pronounced like the the word “saw” or “paw” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ui” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/LAW-soo[t]//ˈlɔ.su[t] / – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Lawyer
 – For this word, the “awy” combination is pronounced like an “oy” combination, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /LOH-y’r//ˈloiː.ɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lawyers
 – For this word, the “awy” combination is pronounced like an “oy” combination, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /LOH-y’r-z//ˈloiː.ɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable –

Lay
 – For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/lay//leiː/

Layer
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “y” takes the consonant sound, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LAY-y’r//ˈleiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that –

Layman
 – For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the second “a” turns into an i-schwa

/LAY-mihn//ˈleiː.mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Layman’s
 – For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/LAY-mihn-z//ˈleiː.mə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

Layoff
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “y” takes the consonant sound (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/LAY-yawf//ˈleiː.jɔf/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Layout
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “y” takes the consonant, and the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/LAY-yow[t]//ˈleiː.jɑu[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Layouts
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “y” takes the consonant, and the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination

/LAY-yow-ts//ˈleiː.jɑu.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

Layton
 – For this name, the “ay” combination is pronounced like a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the “o” disappears

– /LAY[T]-’n//ˈleiː.[t]ən/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lazy
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/LAY-zee//ˈleiː.ziː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Le

Lead (past-tense verb or noun)
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/leh[d]/ – /lɛ[ɾ]/ –

Lead (present-tense verb or noun)
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/lee[d]/ – /liː[ɾ]/ –

Leader
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LEE-d’r//ˈliː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Leadership
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ship” suffix – the “sh” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is an
i-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LEE-d’r//ˈliː.ɾɚ.ʃə(ɪ)[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Leading
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LEE-ding//ˈliː.dɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Leaf
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/leef//liːf/

League
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “g” is hard, and the final “ue” combination is silent

/leeg//liːg/

Leak
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/lee[k]//liːk/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Leakage
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/LEE-kih-dʒ//ˈliː.kə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable –

Leakages
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” combines with the “-es” ending, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/LEE-kih-dʒihz//ˈliː.kə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Leaked
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “k” is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

– /lee[k]-t//liː[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Lean
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/leen//liːn/

Leap
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/lee[p]/ – /liː[p]/ –

Leaped
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “p” is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “p” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/lee[p]-t/ – /liː[p].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable –

Learn
 – For this word, the “ea” combination disappears

– /l’rn//lɚn/

Learned
 – For this word, the “ea” combination disappears, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/l’rn-d/ – /lɚn.d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable –

Lease
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/lees//liːs/

Leasing
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LEE-sing//ˈliː.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Least
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /lees-[t]//liːs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Leather
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “th” combination is voiced, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /LEH-th’r//ˈlɛ.ðɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Leave
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “e” is silent

/leev//liːv/

Lecture
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LEH[K]-ch’r//ˈlɛk.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Left
 – For this word, the “e” is short

/lehf-[t]//lɛf.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Leg
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “g” is hard

/lehg//lɛg/

Legal
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “g” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LEE-gəl/ – /ˈliː.gəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Legend
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “g” is soft, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/LEH-dʒihn-[d]//ˈlɛ.dʒə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Legendary
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “g” is soft, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LEH-dʒihn-dayr-ee//ˈlɛ.dʒə(ɪ)n.deɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Legislation
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “g” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /leh-dʒihs-LAY-sh’n//lɛ.dʒɪs.ˈleiː.ʃən/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Leisure
– For this word, the “ei” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-sure” suffix – the “s” is pronounced like voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LEE-zh’r//ˈliː.ʒɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lemon
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/LEH-mihn//ˈlɛ.mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lend
 – For this word, the “e” is short

/lehn-d//lɛn.d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable –

Length
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination, the “g” is pronounced like the letter “k” (pronounced separately from the letter “n”), and the final “th” combination is un-voiced

/lehng-kth//lɛŋ.kθ/ – Notice also that the “kth” ending acts as a second syllable

Less
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/lehs//lɛs/

Lesson
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/LEH-sihn//ˈlɛ.sə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lessons
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/LEH-sihn-z//ˈlɛ.sə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllables

Let
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/leh[t]//lɛ[t]/

Letter
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /LEH-d’r//ˈlɛ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Level
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, and the second “e” turns into a true-schwa

/LEH-vəl//ˈlɛ.vəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Levels
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/LEH-vəl-z/ – /ˈlɛ.vəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Levi
 – For this name, the “e” is long, and the “i” is long

/LEE-vai/ – /ˈliː.vaiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Levied
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/LEH-vee[d]//ˈlɛ.viː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Levy
 – For this name, the “e” is short, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/LEH-vee/ – /ˈlɛ.viː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Li

Liable
 – For this word, the first “i” is long, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is due to the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

– /LAI-uh-bəl//laiː.ə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Liability
 – For this word, the first “i” is long, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /lai-uh-BIHL-ih-dee//laiː.ə(ʌ).bɪ.lɪ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Libel
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the “e” turns into a true-schwa

– /LAI-bəl/ – /ˈlaiː.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Liberties
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the first “e” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/LIH-b’r-deez//ˈlɪ.bɚ.ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Liberty
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the first “e” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/LIH-b’r-dee//ˈlɪ.bɚ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Library
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LAI-brayr-ee//ˈlaiː.bɹeɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Libya
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “y” and the “a” (this is a product of transitioning from one sound to the next), and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/LIH-bee-yuh//ˈlɪ.biː.jə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

License
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced almos like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/LIGH-sihn-z//ˈlʌiː.sə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

Licensing
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LIGH-sihn-zing//ˈlʌiː.sə(ɪ)n.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lid
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/lih[d]//lɪ[ɾ]/

Lie
 – For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/lai//laiː/

Life
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

– /lighf//lʌiːf/

Lifeless (Life-less)
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the first “e” is silent, and for the “-less” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LIGHF-lihs//ˈlʌiːl.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lift
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/lihf-[t]//lɪf.[t]/ – Notice also that that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Light
 – For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “right” or “fight” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ligh-[t]//ˈlʌiː.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Lightly
 – For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “right” or “fight” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/LIGH[T]-lee//ˈlʌiː.[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lightning
 – For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “right” or “fight” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is a is (usually) stopped, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LIGH[T]-ning//ˈlʌiː[t].nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lightweight (light-Weight)
– For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “right” or “fight” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is (often) stopped, the “eigh” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Dipthing (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ligh[t]-way[t]//lʌiː[t].weiː[t]/ – Notice also that there is not discernible major stress in this word.  Depending on the sentence it can be in either the first or the second syllable –

Likable (Like-able)
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LIGH-kə.bəl//ˈlʌiː.kə.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Like
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “k” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/ligh-[k]//lʌiː.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Liked
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “k” is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

– /ligh[k]-t/ – /lʌiː[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Likelihood
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “e” is silent, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-hood” suffix – the “h” is pronounced, the “oo” combination turns into a true-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LIGHK-lee-hə[d]//ˈlʌiːk.liː.hə[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Likely
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “e” is silent, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/LIGHK-lee//ˈlʌiːk.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Limelight
 – For this word, the first “i” is long, the “e” is silent, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word, “fight” or “right” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/LAIM-ligh[t]//ˈlaiːm.lʌiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Limit
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/LIH-mih[t]//ˈlɪ.mə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Limitation
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/lih-mih-TAY-shihn//lɪ.mə(ɪ).ˈte.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Limited
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is(usually) stopped

– /LIH-mih-tih[d]//ˈlɪ.mɪ.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Limping
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LIHM-ping//ˈlɪm.pɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Line
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/lain//laiːn/

Lingering
 – For this word, the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination, the “g” is hard (pronounced separately from the “in” combination), for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LING-g’r-ing//ˈlɪŋ.gɚ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Link
 – For this word, the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” after it)

/ling-k//lɪŋ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Linkage
 – For this word, the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is one of two the standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /LING-kih-dʒ//ˈlɪŋ.kə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

Linked
 – For this word, the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), the “k” is (usually) stopped, and the since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

– /Ling[k]-t//lɪŋ[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

LinkedIn
 – For this name, the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), the “k” is (usually) stopped, the “e” is silent, and the second “i” (capitalized because it is the proper name of a business and that is how they chose to represent it) is short

– /Ling[k]-dihn//lɪŋ[k].dɪn/ – Notice also that there is no discernible word stress –

Lip
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/lih[p]//lɪ[p]/

Liquid
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/LIH-kwih[d]//ˈlɪ.kwə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

List
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/lihs-[t]//lɪs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Listen
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “t” is silent, and the “e” turns into an i-schwa

– /LIH-sihn//ˈlɪ.sə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Listened
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “t” is silent, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/LIH-sən-[d]//ˈlɪ.sən.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable –

Liter
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LEE-d’r//ˈliː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Literal
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /LIH-d’r-əl//ˈlɪ.ɾɚ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Literally
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” disappears, for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa and the “l” combines with the “ly” suffix, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /LIH-d’r-ə-lee//ˈlɪ.ɾɚ.ə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Literary
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the first “t” is a flap-t, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LIH-d’r-ayr-ee//ˈlɪ.ɾɚ.eɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Literature
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the first “t” is a flap-t, the “e” disappears, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LIH-d’r-uh-ch’r//ˈlɪ.ɾɚ.ə(ʌ).tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Litigate
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LIH-dih-gay[t]//ˈlɪ.ɾə(ɪ).e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Litigation
 – For this word, the first “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/lih-dih-GAY-shihn/ – /ˈlə(ɪ).ɾə(ɪ).ˈgeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Litter
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like a single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” disappears

– /LIH-d’r/ – /ˈlɪ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Little
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “tt” is pronounced simply like a single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “t” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent

– /LIH-dəl//ˈlɪ.ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Livable
 – For this word, the “i” is short , and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /LIHV-uh-bəl//ˈlɪv.ə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Live (adjective)
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the “e” is silent

– /laiv//laiːv/

Live (verb)
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “e” is silent

– /lihv//lɪv/

Lived
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and since the root word ends with the sound of the letter “v”, the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

– /lihv-[d]//lɪv.[d]/

Lively
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LAIV-lee//ˈlaiːv.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lives (plural noun)
– For this word, the “i” is long, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /laiv-z//laiːv.z/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts almost like a separate syllable –

Lives (infinitive verb)
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /lihv-z//lɪv.z/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts almost like a separate syllable –

Living
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /LIH-vihŋ//ˈlɪ.vɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lo

Load
 – For this word, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /loh[d]//lo[ɾ]/ –

Loaded
 – For this word, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /loh-dih[d]/ – /ˈlo.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Loan
 – For this word, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /lohn//lon/

Lobby
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “bb” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “b” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/LAH-bee//ˈlɑ.biː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lobbyist
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “bb” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “b” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “y” and the “i” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-ist” suffix – and the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LAH-bee-yihs[t]/ – /ˈlɑ.biː.jə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Lobes
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/lohb-z//lob.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

Lobster
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “b” is almost stopped, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LAH[B]-st’r//ˈlɑ[b].stɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Local
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “c” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LOH-kəl//ˈlo.kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Locally
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “c” is hard,for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa and the “l” combines with the “ly” suffix, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/LOH-kə-lee/ – /ˈlo.kə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Locate
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LOH-kay[t]//ˈlo.ke[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Located
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “c” is hard, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is is a flap-t, and the final “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /LOH-kay-dih[d]//ˈlo.kaɪ.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Location
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/loh-KAY-shihn//lo.ˈkeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Lock
 – For this word, the “o” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/lah-k//lɑ.k/ – Notice also that the “ck” ending acts as a second syllable –

Locked
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) – however, with the addition of the “-ed” ending – the “k” is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/lah[k]-t//lɑ[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Logged
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “g” but is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “g” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/law[g]-d//lɔ[g].d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

Logic
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “g” is soft, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LAH-dʒih[k]//ˈlɑ.dʒə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Logical
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “g” is soft, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LAH-dʒih-kəl/ – /ˈlɑ.dʒə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Logistic
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is soft, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/lə-dʒIHS-tihk/ – /lə(ʌ).ˈdʒɪs.tə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Logistics
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is soft, the first “i” is short, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /lə-dʒIHS-tih-ks//lə(ʌ).ˈdʒɪs.tə(ɪ).ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

London
 – For this word, the first “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the second “o” turns into an i-schwa

– /LUHN-dihn//ˈlʌn.də(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lonely
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is
the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LOHN-lee//ˈlon.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Long
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “ring” or “sing” (This is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /lawŋ//lɔŋ/

Longer
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination, the “g” is hard (pronounced separately from the letter “n”), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LAWNG-g’r//ˈlɔŋ.gɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Longitude
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “g” is soft (pronounced separately from the letter “n”), the “i” is an i-schwa, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/LAWN-dʒih-too[d]//ˈlɔn.dʒə(ɪ).tu[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Look
 – For this word, the “oo” combination turns into a true-schwa (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/lə-k//lə.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Looked
 – For this word, the “oo” combination turns into a true-schwa (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “k” is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” is silent, final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/lə[k]-t/ – /lə[k].t/ –

Loofah
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ah” combination turns into a u-schwa

– /LOO-fuh//ˈlu.fə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Loose
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/loos//lus/

Loosely
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LOOS-lee/ – /ˈlus.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Loosen
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/loos//lus/

Looted
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “t” is a flap-t but is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/LOO-[t]-ihd/ – /ˈlu.[ɾ].ə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lord
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/lor-[d]//loɹ.ɾ/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Lorry
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/LOHR-ee//ˈloɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Los Angeles
 – For this name, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “A” is short, the “g” is soft, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the second “e” turns into an i-schwa

/laws-æN-dʒə-lihs//lɔs.ˈæn.dʒə.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Lose
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/looz//luz/

Losing
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LOO-zing/ – /ˈlu.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Loss
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/laws/ – /lɔs/ –

Losses
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /LAW-sihz//ˈlɔ.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lost
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/laws-[t]//lɔs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Lot
 – For this word, the “o” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/lah-[t]//lɑ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Loud
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/low-[d]//lɑu.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Loudly
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LOW[D]-lee//ˈlɔ[d].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Love
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the final “e” is silent

/luhv//lʌv/

Lovely
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LUHV-lee//ˈlʌv.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lover
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LUH-v’r//ˈlʌ.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lovers
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /LUH-v’r-z//ˈlʌ.vɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

Loves
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/luhv-z//lʌv.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a separate syllable

Low
 – For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”)

/loh//lo/

Lower
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “w” is pronounced separately from the letter “o” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of the “ow” combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” disappears

/LOH-w’r/ – /ˈlo.wɚ/ – Notice that the stress is on the first syllable –

Lowest
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “w” is pronounced separately from the letter “o” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of the “ow” combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LOH-ihs[t]/ – /ˈlo.ə(ɪ)s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Loyal
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “oy” combination, the “y” takes the consonant sound, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LOY-yəl//ˈloiː.jəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lu

Luck
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/luh-k//lʌ.k/ – Notice also that the “ck” ending acts as a second syllable

Luckily
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LUH-lih-lee//ˈlʌ.kə(ɪ).liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lucky
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/LUH-kee//ˈlʌ.kiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lucrative
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “c” is hard, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LOO-kruh-tihv//ˈlu.kɹə(ʌ).tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Luggage
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /LUH-gih-dʒ//ˈlʌ.ɡə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable –

Lukewarm
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “e” is silent, and the “a” is pronounced like the long letter “o”

/look-wohr-m/ – /luk.woɹ.m/ – Notice also that this word is pronounced as if it were two separate words, therefore there is no distinguishable major word-stress –

Lump
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the final “p” is (sometimes) stopped

/lum-[p]//ˈlʌm.[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” ending acts as a second syllable

Lunch
 – For this word, the “u” is short

/luhn-ch//lʌn.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

Lung
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/lung//ˈlʌŋ/

Lunge
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “n” is pronounced normally (the “g” which follows it does not affect the pronunciation), the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/luhn-dʒ/ – /lʌn.dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lunging
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “n” is pronounced normally (the “g” which follows it does not affect the pronunciation),the “g” is soft (pronounced separately from the letter “n”), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/LUHN-dʒing/ – /ˈlʌn.dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Lure
 – For this word, the “u” is long, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “u” and the “r”, and the final “e” is silent

/LOO-ər/ – /ˈlu.əɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Luxurious
 – For this word, the first “u” is a u-schwa, the “xu” combination is pronounced like the hard letter “g” combined with the voiced version of the “sh” combination, the second “u” disappears, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next),  and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /luhg-ZH’R-ee-yihs//lʌg.ˈʒɚ.iː.jə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Luxury
 – For this word, the first “u” is short, the “xu” combination is pronounced like the hard letter “g” combined with the voiced version of the “sh” combination, the second “u” disappears, and finally the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /LUHG-zh’r-ee//ˈlʌg.ʒɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter L ) –


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