– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter M:  Ma ) –


 

An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Ma

 

Me . Mi . Mo . Mp . Mr . Ms . Mu . My

 

MA
– For this acronym (as with all acronyms which do not spell a discernible word) we pronounce each letter as the name of that letter

/ehm-ay//ɛm.eiː/ – Notice also that there is no discernible stress –

 

Machine
– For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ch” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the long “e”, and the final “e” is silent

/muh-SHEEN//mə(ʌ).ˈʃiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Machine-Gun
– For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ch” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the long “e”, the “e” is silent, the “G” is hard, and the “u” is short

/muh-SHEEN-guhn//mə(ʌ).ˈʃiːn.gʌn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Machinery
– For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ch” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the long “e”, the “e” disappears, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/muh-SHEE-n’r-ee//mə(ʌ).ʃiː.nɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Mad
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/mæ[d]//mæ[ɾ]/

 

Made
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/mæ[d]//mæ[ɾ]/

 

Madrid
– For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is short, and the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

/muh-dʒRIH-[d]//mə(ʌ).dʒɹɪ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Magazine
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the “g” is hard, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “e” is silent

/MæG-uh-zeen//ˈmæg.ə(ʌ).ziːn/ – Notice also that the stress is (usually) on the first syllable (but it can also be on the third syllable) –

 

Magic
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “g” is soft, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-dʒihk//ˈmæ.dʒə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Magistrate
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the “g” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” is a True Long A, the second “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/-dʒihs-chre[t]//ˈmæ.dʒə(ɪ)s.tʃɹe[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Magnifying
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “g” is hard, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “y” and the “i” of the “-ing” suffix (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MæG-nih-fai-ying//ˈmæg.nə(ɪ).faiː.jɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mail
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it)

/mayl//meɪl/

 

Mailing
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MAYL-ing//meɪl.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Main
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

/mayn//meiːn/

 

Mainly
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MAYN-lee//meiːn.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Maintain
– For this word, the first “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the second “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

/mayn-TAYN//meiːn.ˈteiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Maintained
– For this word, the first “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the second “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and since the root word-ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/mayn-TAYN-d//meiːn.ˈteiːn.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Maintenance
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MAYN[T]-nihns//ˈmeiːn[t].nə(ɪ)ns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Majestic
– For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/muh-dʒEHS-tih[k]//mə(ʌ).ˈdʒɛs.tə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Majority
– For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/muh-dʒOHR-ih-dee//mʌ.ˈdʒoɹ.ɪ.ɾɪ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Make
– For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, and the final “e” is silent

/may-k//me.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Makeshift
– For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “e” is silent, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/MAYK-shihf-[t]//ˈmek.ʃə(ɪ)f.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Malaysia
– For this word, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “ay” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/mə-LAY-zhuh//məl.ˈeiː.ʒə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Malaysian
– For this word, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “ay” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the final “a” turns into an i-schwa

/mə-LAY-zhihn//məl.ˈeiː.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Maldivan
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the second “a” turns into an i-schwa

/MAWL-dih-vihn//ˈmɔl.də(ɪ).və(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Maldives
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “i” is long, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/MAWL-daiv-z//ˈmɔl.daiːv.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Male
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/mayl//meɪl/

 

Mall
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/mawl//mɔl/

 

Malleable
– For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “e” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MAYL-ee-yuh-bəl//ˈmeɪl.iː.jə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Malls
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l”(this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “s”

/mawl-z//mɔl.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts like a second syllable

 

Man
– For this word, the “a” is short

/mæn//mæn/

 

Manage
– For this word, the first “a” is short, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-nih-dʒ//ˈmæ.nə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “g” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Manageable (Manage-able)
– For this word, the first “a” is short, for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-nih.dʒuh.bəl//ˈmæ.nə(ɪ).dʒə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Management
– For this word, the first “a” is short, for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-nihdʒ-mihn[t]//ˈmæ.nə(ɪ)dʒ.mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Management‘s
– For this word, the first “a” is short, for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-nihdʒ-mihn-ts//ˈmæ.nə(ɪ)dʒ.mə(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Manager
– For this word the first “a” is short, for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” combines with the “-er” suffix, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-nih-dʒ’r//ˈmæ.nə(ɪ).gɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Managerial
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, the “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-nih-dʒEER-ee-əl//ˌmæ.nə(ɪ).ˈdʒiːɹ.iː.əl/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Managers/’s/s
– These words (whether plural, possessive, or plural-possessive) are all pronounced the same – The first “a” is short, for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” combines with the “-er” suffix, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/-nih-dʒ’r-z//ˈmæn.ə(ɪ).dʒɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Managing
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-nih-dʒing//ˈmæ.nə(ɪ).dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mandatory
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ory” suffix – the “o” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the common pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MæN-də-tohr-ee//ˈmæn.də.toɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Manipulate
– For this word, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mə-NIH-pyoo-lay[t]//mə.ˈnɪ.pju.le[iː][t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Manipulated
– For this word, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/mə-NIH-pyoo-lay-dih[d]//mə.ˈnɪ.pju.leiː.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Manipulation
– For this word, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/muh-nih-pyoo-LAY-shihn//mə(ʌ).ˌnə(ɪ).pjuˈleiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress is on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Mankind (Man-kind)
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “i” is long, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/mæn-KAIN-[d]//mæn.kaiːn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Manner
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” disappears

/-n’r//ˈmæ.nɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Manners
 – For this word, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)the “e” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/-n’r-z//ˈmæ.nɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllables and that the “z” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Manual
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MæN-yoo-əl//ˈmæn.ju.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Manufacture
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “a” is also short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ture” suffix –the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mæn-yoo-[K]-ch’r//ˌmæn.ju.ˈfæ[k].tʃɚ/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress is on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Manufacturer
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “a” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ture” suffix –the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the “e” combines with the “-er” ending, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mæn-yoo-[K]-ch’r-r’r//mæn.ju.ˈfæ[k].tʃɚ.ɹɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that there is a phantom letter “r” in-between the first “r” and the disappearing “e”, this is only to make it possible to distinguish between the two “r” sounds –

 

Manufacturing
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “a” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mæn-yoo-[K]-ch’r-ing//ˌmæn.ju.ˈfæ[k].tʃɚ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Manure
– For this word, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, there is a phantom-w in-between the “u” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/mə-NOO-w’r//mə.ˈnu.wɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Many
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “e”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/MEH-nee//ˈmɛ.niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Map
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/mæ-[p]//mæ.[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” (when not stopped) ending acts as a second syllable

 

Marathon
– For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “th” combination is un-voiced, and the “o” is short

/MAYR-uh-thahn//ˈmeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).θɑn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

March
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/mahr-ch//mɑɹ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Marginalize
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MAHR-dʒihn-ə-laiz//ˈmɑɹ.dʒə(ɪ)n.ə.laiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Marginalized
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/MAHR-dʒihn-əl-aiz-d//ˈmɑɹ.dʒə(ɪ)n.əl.aiːz.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Marijuana
– For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is an i-schwa, the “ju” combination is pronounced like the letter “w”, the first “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/mayr-ih-WAW-nuh//ˌmeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)ˈwɔ.nə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Marital
– For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MAYR-ih-dəl//ˈmeɪɹ.ə(ɪ).ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mark
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/mahr-k//mɑɹ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Market
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/MAHR-kih[t]//ˈmɑɹ.kə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Marketing
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MAHR-kih-ding//ˈmɑɹ.kə(ɪ).ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Marriage
– For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ia” combination is turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/MAYR-idʒ//ˈmeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Marriages
– For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ia” combination turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, the final “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/MAYR-ih-dʒihz//ˈmeɪɹ.ə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Married
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “i” (converted from the letter “y” due to the addition of the suffix) – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d, but is (often) stopped

/MAYR-ee[d]//ˈmeɪɹ.iː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Marry
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/MAYR-ee//ˈmeɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Marvelous
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MAHR-və-lihs//ˈmɑɹ.və.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Maryland
– For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “y” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-land” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/MAYR-ə-lihn[d]//ˈmeɪɹ.ə.lə(ɪ)n[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mask
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “k” is (sometimes) stopped

/mæ-s[k]//ˈmæ.s[k]/ – Notice also that the “sk” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Mass
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/mæs//mæs/

 

Massacre
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), second “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, and the final “e” is silent

/-sə-k’r//ˈmæs.ə.kɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Massage
– For this word, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the final “e” is silent (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/muh-SAHZH//mə(ʌ).ˈsɑʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Massaging
– For this word, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” sounds like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/muh-SAH-zhing//mə(ʌ).ˈsɑ.ʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Massive
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-sihv//ˈmæ.sɪv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Master
– For this word, the “a” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MæS-t’r//ˈmæs.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Match
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/mæ-ch//mæ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Matches
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced (almost) like the letter “z”

/-chihz//ˈmæ.tʃə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Matching
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-ching//ˈmæ.tʃɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mate
– For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/may[t]//me[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Material
– For this word, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/muh-TEER-ee-yəl//mə(ʌ).ˈtiːɹ.iː.jəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Materials
– For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/muh-TEER-ee-yəl-z//mə(ʌ).ˈtiːɹ.iː.jəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Maternal
– For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/muh-T’R-nəl//mə(ʌ).ˈtɚ.nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Maternity
– For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/muh-T’R-nih-dee//mə(ʌ).ˈtɚ.nə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Math
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/mæth//mæθ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Mathematician
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the “th” combination in un-voiced, the “e” disappears, the second “a” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the third “a” turns into an i-schwa

/mæ-th-mə-TIH-shihn//mæ.θ.mə.ˈtɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Mathematics
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is short, the second “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mæ-thə-Mæ-dih-ks//ˌmæ.θə.ˈmæ.ɹə(ɪ).ks/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Matrimonial
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the second “i” is a long “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mæ-chrih-MOH-nee-yəl//mæ.tʃɹə(ɪ).ˈmo.niː.jəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Matrix
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/MAY-trih-ks//ˈmeiː.tʃɹə(ɪ).ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a third syllable

Matter
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t, (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” disappears

/-d’r//ˈmæ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Matthew
– For this name, the “a” is short, the “tth” combination is pronounced simply like the un-voiced “th” combination, and the “ew” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”

/MæTH-yoo//ˈmæθ.ju/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Maximum
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “u” is a u-schwa

/MæK-sih-muhm//ˈmæk.sə(ɪ).mə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

May
– For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/may//meiː/

 

Maybe
– For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the True Long “A” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is long

/MAY-bee//ˈme.biː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mayor
– For this word, the “a” is long, the “y” takes the consonant sound, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MAY-y’r//ˈmeiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mazes
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “e” turns into an i-schwa and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/MAY-zihz//ˈmeiː.zə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter M ) –


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