– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter M:  Me ) –


 

An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Me

 

Ma . Mi . Mo . Mp . Mr . Ms . Mu . My

 

Me
– For this word, the “e” is long

/mee//miː/

 

Meal
– For this word, the “e” is long, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

/MEE-əl//ˈmiː.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mean
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/meen//miːn/

 

Meaning
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEE-ning//ˈmiː.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Means
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/meen-z//miːn.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Meant
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/mehn-[t]//mɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Meanwhile
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “w” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” and a phantom-schwa in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/MEEN-wai-yəl//ˈmiːn.waiː.jəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Measure
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” silent

/MEH-zh’r//ˈmɛ.ʒɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Measurement
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, the second “e” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEH-zh’r-mihn-[t]//ˈmɛ.ʒɚ.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Measures
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, the second “e” silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/MEH-zh’r-z//ˈmɛ.ʒɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Meat
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/mee-[t]//ˈmiː.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Mechanic
– For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “a” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is
(sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mih--nih[k]//mə(ɪ).ˈkæ.nə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Mechanical
– For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “a” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is
(sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mih--nih-kəl//mə(ɪ).ˈkæ.nə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Mechanics / ‘s / s’
– For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “a” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mih--nih-ks//mə(ɪ).ˈkæ.nə(ɪ).ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Media
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “a” turns into a u-schwa

/MEE-dee-yuh//ˈmiː.ɾiː.jə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mediation
– For this word, the “e” is long, the first “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “a” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mee-dee-YAY-shihn//miː.ɾiː.ˈjeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Mediator
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “o” disappears

/MEE-dee-yay-d’r//ˈmiː.ɾiː.je.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Medical
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEH-dih-kəl//ˈmɛ.ɾə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Medication
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/meh-dih-KAY-shihn//ˌmɛ.ɾə(ɪ).ˈkeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Medicine
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/MEH-dih-sihn//ˈmɛ.ɾə(ɪ).sə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Medieval
– For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mihd-EE-vəl//mə(ɪ)ɾ.ˈiː.vəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Mediocre
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “o” is long, the “c” is hard, and the final “e” is silent

/mee-dee-OH-k’r//miː.ɾiː.ˈjo.kɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Meditating
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEH-dih-tay-ding//ˈmɛ.ɾə(ɪ).te.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Meditation
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEH-dih-tay-shihn//ˈmɛ.ɾə(ɪ).te.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mediterranean
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the third “e” is long, and the second “a” turns into an i-schwa

/meh-dih-t’r-AY-nee-ihn//ˌmɛ.ɾə(ɪ).tɚ.ˈeiː.niː.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Medium
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “u” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “u” is a u-schwa

/MEE-dee-yuhm//ˈmiː.ɾiː.jə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Meet
– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/mee-[t]//miː.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Meeting
– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEE-ding//ˈmiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Meets
– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/mee-ts//miː.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Mega-Cities
– For this compound word, the first “e” is short, the “g” is hard, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “C” is soft, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/MEH-guh-sih-deez//ˈmɛ.gə(ʌ).sə(ɪ).ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Meld
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/mehl[d]//ˈmɛl[d]/

 

Melding
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounce like in the word “sing” or “ring” (This is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEHL-ding//ˈmɛl.dɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Melodic
– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mə-LAH-dih[k]//mə.ˈlɑ.ɾə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Melt
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/mehl-[t]//mɛl.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Meltdown
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “how” or “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/MEH[T]-down//mɛl[t].dɑun/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Member
– For this word, the first “e” is short, and the second “e” disappears

/MEHM-b’r//ˈmɛm.bɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Membership
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-ship” suffix – the “sh” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is an
i-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEHM-b’r-shih[p]//ˈmɛm.bɚ.ʃə(ɪ)[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Memoir
– For this word, the “e” is short, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the second letter “m” and the “o”, and the “oi” combination is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/MEHM-wahr//ˈmɛm.wɑɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first stress

 

Memorandum
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “o” disappears, the “a” is short, and the final “u” turns into a u-schwa

/meh-m’r-æN-duhm//ˌmɛ.mɚ.ˈæn.də(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Memorial
– the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/meh-MOHR-ee-əl//mɛ.ˈmoɹ.iː.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Memory
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/MEH-muh-ree//ˈmɛ.mə(ʌ).ɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mental
– For this word, the “e” is short, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEHN-təl//ˈmɛn.təl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mentality
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “a” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mehn--lih-dee//mɛn.ˈtæ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Mentally
– For this word, the “e” is short, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “l” combines with the “-ly” ending and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEHN-tə-lee//ˈmɛn.tə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mention
– For this word, the “e” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEHN-shihn//ˈmɛn.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mentioned
– For this word, the “e” is short, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/MEHN-shihn-d//ˈmɛn.ʃə(ɪ)n.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mentor
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the “o” is long

/MEHN-tohr//ˈmɛn.toɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Menu
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”

/MEHN-yoo//ˈmɛn.ju/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mercedes
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is pronounced like a True Long “A”, the “d” is a flap-d, the last letter “e” is long, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/m’r-SAY-deez//mɚ.se.ɾiːz/ – Noticed also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Mere
– For this word, the first “e” is long, and the second “e” is silent

/meer//miːɹ/

 

Merely
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the second “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/MEER-lee//ˈmiːɹ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Merge
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/m’r-dʒ//mɚ.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Merged
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “g” is soft, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the soft letter “g” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and, according to the rules of the pronunciation of the “-ed” ending, the “d” should be pronounced normally, however, as we pronounce it naturally it actually sounds like the letter “t”

/m’rdʒ-t//mɚdʒ.t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Merger
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “g” is soft, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/M’R-dʒr//ˈmɚ.dʒɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mergers
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “g” is soft, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/M’R-dʒr-z//ˈmɚ.dʒɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Mesh
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

/meh-sh//mɛ.ʃ/ – Notice also that the “sh” combination acts as a second syllable

 

Mesmerism
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEHZ-m’r-ih-zəm//ˈmɛz.mɚ.ə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mesmerizing
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “e” disappears, the “i” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEHZ-m’r-ai-zihŋ//ˈmɛz.mɚ.aiː.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mesopotamia
– For this word, the “e” is short, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “a” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/meh-sə-pə-TAY-mee-yuh//mɛ.sə.pə.ˈt/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Mess
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/mehs//mɛs/

 

Message
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEH-sihdʒ//ˈmɛ.sə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Messaging
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is dropped (this is due to the addition of the “-ing” suffix), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEH-sih-dʒɪŋ//ˈmɛ.sə(ɪ).dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Messy
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/MEH-see//ˈmɛ.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Met
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/meh[t]//mɛ[t]/

 

Metal
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEH-d’l//ˈmɛ.ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Metaphor
– For this word, the “e’ is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-or” suffix – the “o” is long (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEH-duh-fohr//ˈmɛ.ɾə(ʌ).foɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Metaphors
– For this word, the “e’ is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-or” suffix – the “o” is long (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounce almost like the letter “z”

/MEH-duh-fohr-z//ˈmɛ.ɾə(ʌ).foɹ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Meter
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and the second “e” disappears

/MEE-d’r//ˈmiː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Meters
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “e” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/MEE-d’rz//miː.ɾɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Meteor
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “e” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “o” disappears

/MEE-dee-y’r//ˈmiː.ɾiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Meteorite
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “e” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “o” disappears, and for the “ite” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/MEE-dee-y’r-igh[t]//ˈmiː.ɾiː.jɚ.ʌiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Method
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/MEH-thih[d]//ˈmɛ.θə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Methodical
– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/meh-THAH-dih-kəl//mɛ.θɑ.ɾɪ.kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Metric
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEH-chrih[k]//ˈmɛ.tʃɹə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Metrics
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEH-chrih-ks//ˈmɛ.tʃɹə(ɪ).ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Metropolis
– For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the letter “r” directly after it), the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the “i” is an i-schwa

/mih-CHRAH-pə-lihs//mɛ.tʃɹɑ.pə.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Metropolises
– For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the letter “r” directly after it), the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/mih-CHRAH-pə-lih-sihs//mɛ.tʃɹɑ.pə.lə(ɪ).sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Metropolitan
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the letter “r” directly after it), the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is short, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/meh-chrə-PAH-lih-tihn//ˌmɛ.tʃɹə.ˈpɑ.lə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Mexico
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and the final “o” is long

/MEK-sih-koh//ˈmɛk.sə(ɪ).ko/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter M ) –


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