– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter M:  Mi ) –


 

An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Mi

 

Ma . Me . Mo . Mp . Mr . Ms . Mu . My

 

Mic
– For this abbreviation, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/migh-[k]//mʌiː.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Mice
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/migh-s//mʌiː.s/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Micro-
– For this word or prefix, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is hard, and the final “o” is long

/MIGH-kroh//ˈmʌiː.kɹo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Microphone (micro-Phone)
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is hard, the first “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation for this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/MIGH-kruh-fohn//ˈmʌiː.kɹə(ʌ).fon/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Microphones (micro-Phones)
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is hard, the first “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation for this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” is long, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/MIGH-kruh-fohn-z//ˈmʌiː.kɹə(ʌ).fon.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Mid-
– For this prefix, the “i” is short, and the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/mih[d]//mɪ[ɾ]/

 

Mid-Day
– For this word, the “i” is short, the first “d” is a flap-d but is stopped, the second “d” is pronounced as normal, and the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/MIH[D]-day//ˈmɪ[ɾ].de/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Middle
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “dd” combination is pronounced simply like the single a flap-d (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “d” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/MIH-dəl//ˈmɪ.ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Midnight (mid-Night)
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “night” or “light” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/MIH[D]-nigh[t]//ˈmɪ[ɾ].nʌiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Might
– For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word, “night” or “flight” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/migh[t]//mʌiː[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Migraine
– For this word, the first “i” is long, the “g” is hard, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/MAI-grayn//ˈmaiː.gɹeiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Migraines
– For this word, the first “i” is long, the “g” is hard, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “es” suffix – the “e” is silent and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/MAI-grayn-z//ˈmaiː.gɹeiːn.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Milan
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/mih-LAHN//mə(ɪ).ˈlɑn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Mild
– For this word, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” and phantom-schwa combination in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

/MAI-yəl-[d]//ˈmaiː.jəl.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Mile
– For this word, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” and phantom-schwa combination in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/MAI-yəl//ˈmaiː.jəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Milestone (Mile-Stone)
– For this word, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” and phantom-schwa combination in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the first “e” is silent

/MAI-yəl-stohn//ˈmaiː.jəl.ston/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Milestones (Mile-Stones)
– For this word, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” and phantom-schwa combination in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the first “e” is silent, the “o” is long, the second “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/MAI-yəl-stohn-z//ˈmaiː.jəl.ston.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Military
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/MIH-lih-tayr-ee//ˈmɪ.lə(ɪ).teɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Milk
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “k” is (sometimes) stopped

/mihl-[k]//mɪl.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Milligram (milli-Gram)
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, and the “a” is short

/MIH-lih-græm//ˈmɪ.lə(ɪ).gɹæm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Millimeter (milli-Meter)
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is an i-schwa, the first “e” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and the second “e” disappears

/MIH-lih-mee-d’r//ˈmɪ.lə(ɪ).miː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Million
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is pronounced like the consonant form of the letter “y”, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/MIHL-yihn//ˈmɪl.jə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Millionaire
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y”, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-aire” suffix – the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/MIHL-yihn-ayr//ˈmɪl.jə(ɪ)n.eɪɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Millions
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is pronounced like the consonant form of the letter “y”, the “o” turns into a i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/MIHL-yihn-z//ˈmɪl.jə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mind
– For this word, the “i” is long, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/main-[d]//maiːn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Mindset (Mind-set)
– For this word, the “i” is long, the “d” is (usually) stopped, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/MAIN[D]-seh[t]//ˈmaiːn[d].sɛ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mine
– For this word, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/main//maiːn/

 

Mineral
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “e” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MIH-n’r-əl//ˈmɪ.nɚ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mines
– For this word, the “i” is long, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/man-z//maiːn.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Miniature
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MIH-nee-ə-ch’r//ˈmɪ.niː.ə.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Minimize
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MIH-nih-maiz//ˈmɪ.nɪ.maɪz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Minimum
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the “u” is a u-schwa

/MIH-mih-muhm//ˈmɪ.nə(ɪ)mə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Minister
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this
suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MIH-nih-st’r//ˈmɪ.nə(ɪ).stɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Ministry
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/MIH-mihs-chree//ˈmɪ.nə(ɪ)s.tʃɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Minor
– For this word, the “i” is long, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MAI-n’r//ˈmaiː.nɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Minority
– For this word, the first “i” is long, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” is long (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the
final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mai-NOHR-ih-dee//maiː.ˈnoɹ.ə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Minute (adjective)
– For this word, the “i” is long, the “u” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/mai-NOO[T]//maiː.ˈnu[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Minute (noun)
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “u” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/MIH-nih[t]//ˈmɪ.nə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Minutes
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “u” turns into an i-schwa, and the “e” is silent

/MIH-nih-ts//ˈmɪ.nɪ.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Miracle
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, there is a phantom-schwa, in-between the “c” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent

/MEERih-kəl//ˈmiːɹ.ə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Miraculous
– For this word, the “i” disappears, the “a” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/m’r-æ-kyou-lihs//mɚ.ˈæ.kju.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Miraculously
– For this word, the “i” disappears, the “a” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/m’r-æ-kyou-lihs-lee//mɚ.ˈæ.kju.lə(ɪ)s.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mirror
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “rr” combination is pronounced like two separate letters “r” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue and is the product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEER-r’r//ˈmiːɹ.ɹɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Misbehave (miss-Behave)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/mihs-bee-HAYV//ˌmə(ɪ)s.biː.ˈheiːv/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Misbehaving (miss-Behaving)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mihs-bee-HAY-ving//ˌmə(ɪ)s.biː.ˈheiː.vɪŋ/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Miscalculating (miss-Calculating)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “c” is hard, the first “a” is short, the second “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mihs-KæL-kyou-lay-ding//mɪs.ˈkæl.kju.leiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Misdemeanor (miss-Demeanor)
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MIHS-də-mee-n’r//ˈmɪs.də.miː.nɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Miserable
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “e” disappears, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MIH-z’ruh-bəl//ˈmɪzɚ(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mislead (miss-Lead)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/mihs-LEE[D]//mɪs.ˈliː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Misleading (miss-Leading)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mihs-LEE-ding//mɪs.ˈliː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Misnomer (miss-Nome-er)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “o” is long, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mihs-NOH-m’r//mə(ɪ)s.ˈno.mɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Miss
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/mihs//mɪs/

 

Missed
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/mihs-[t]//mɪs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Misses
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-es” ending – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/MIH-sihz//ˈmɪ.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Missing
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MIH-sing//ˈmɪ.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mistake (miss-Take)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, and the final “e” is silent

/mihs-TAYK//mə(ɪ)s.ˈtek/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Mistaken (miss-Taken)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard
pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mihs-TAY-kihn//mə(ɪ)s.ˈte.kə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Mitigate
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the first “t” is a flap-t, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MIH-dih-gay[t]//ˈmɪ.ɾə(ɪ).ge[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mitigation
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the first “t” is a flap-t, the “g” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mih-dih-GAY-shihn//mɪ.ɾə(ɪ).ˈgeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Mix
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/mih-ks//mɪ.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Mixed
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/MIH-ks-[t]//ˈmɪ.ks.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Mixture
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combinationand for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MIH-ks-ch’r//ˈmɪ.ks.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter M ) –


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