– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter M:  Mo ) –


 

An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Mo

 

Ma . Me . Mi . Mp . Mr . Ms . Mu . My

 

Mobile
– For this word, the “o” is long, and the “i” can either be long, or is turns into a phantom-schwa, and in both versions, the “e” is silent

/MOH-bail//ˈmo.baiːl/ – Or – /MOH-bəl//ˈmo.bəl/ – Notice also that (in both pronunciations) the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mockumentary
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “e” is short, and for the “-ary” suffix” – the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mahk-you-MEHN-t’-ree//ˌmɑk.ju.ˈmɛn.tɚ.iː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Model
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “e” turns into a true-schwa

/MAH-dəl//ˈmɑ.ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Modern
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “e” disappears

/MAH-d’rn//ˈmɑ.ɾɚn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Modest
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MAH-dihs-[t]//ˈmɑ.ɾə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Moisture
– For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears

/MOYS-ch’r//ˈmɔɪs.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Moisturize
– For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the
standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MOYS-ch’r-aiz//ˈmɔɪs.tʃɚ.aiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Moisturizer
– For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, the “i” is long, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MOYS-ch’r-ai-z’r//ˈmɔɪs.tʃɚ.aɪ.zɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mom
– For this word, the “o” is short

/mah-m//mɑ.m/ – Notice also that the “m” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Moment
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/MOH-mihn-[t]//ˈmo.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Momentous
– For this word, the first “o” is long, the “e” is short, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is
the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/moh-MEHN-tihs//mo.ˈmɛn.tə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Momentum
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “e” is short, and the “u” turns into a u-schwa

/moh-MEHN-tuhm//mo.ˈmɛn.tə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Mommy
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/MAH-mee//ˈmɑ.miː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Monday
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/MUHN-day//ˈmʌn.deiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Money
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the “ey” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/MUH-nee//ˈmʌ.niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Monitor
– For this word, the first “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MAH-nih-t’r//ˈmɑ.nə(ɪ).tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Monitoring
– For this word, the first “o” is short, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MAH-nih-t’ring//ˈmɑ.nə(ɪ).tɚ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Monkey
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), and the “ey” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/MUNG-kee//ˈmʌŋ.kiː/ – Notice also that the stress in on the first syllable

 

Monopoly
– For this word, the first “o” disappears, the second “o” is short, the third “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/m’-NAH-pə.lee//m’nɑ.pə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Monotonous
– For this word, the first “o” disappears, the second “o” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, the third “o” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mih-NAH-[t]ih-nihs//mə(ɪ).ˈnɑ.[t]ə(ɪ).nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Monsieur
– For this word, the “on” combination turns into an i-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y”, and the “eu” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “u”

/mih-SYOOR//mə(ɪ).ˈsjur/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Month
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/muhn-th//mʌn.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Monthly
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “th” combination is un-voiced, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MUHN-th-lee//ˈmʌn.θ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Months
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/muhn-ths//mʌn.θs/ – Notice also that the “ths” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Mood
– For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped,

/moo[d]//mu[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) act as a second syllable

 

Moon
– For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/moon//mun/

 

Moose
– For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/moos//mus/

 

Moral
– For this word, the “o” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MOHR-əl//ˈmoɹ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Morale
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is short, and the final “e” is silent

/mə-RæL//mə.ˈɹæl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Morally (Moral-ly)
– For this word, the “o” is long, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MOHR-ə-lee//ˈmoɹ.ə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Moratorium
– For this word, the first “o” is long the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the second “o” is long, and the for the “-ium” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “u” is a u-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mohr-ih-TOHR-ee-uhm//ˌmoɹ.ə(ɪ).ˈtoɹ.iː.ə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

More
– For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/mohr//moɹ/

 

Moreover (more-over)
– For this word, the first “o” is long, the first “e” is silent, the second “o” is long, and the second “e” disappears

/mohr-OH-v’r//moɹˈo.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Morning
– For this word, the “o” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MOHR-ning//ˈmoɹ.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mortality (Mortal-ity)
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “a” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mohr--lih-dee//moɹ.ˈtæ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Mortgage
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “t” is silent, the first “g” is hard, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MOHR-gih-dʒ//ˈmoɹ.gə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Moscow
– For this word, the first “o” is short, the “c” is hard, the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “how” or “now”

/MAHS-kow//ˈmɑs.kɑu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mosque
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the letter “k” but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/mahs-[k]//mɑs.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Mosques
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the letter “k”, and the “e” is silent

/mahs-ks//mɑs.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Most
– For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/moh-s[t]//mo.s[t]/ – Notice also that the “st” ending (even when the “t” is stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Mostly
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MOHS[T]-lee-//ˈmos[t]-lee/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mother
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “th” combination is voiced, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MUH-th’r//ˈmʌ.ðɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mothers/’s/s’
– For this word (whether plural, possessive, or plural-possessive), the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “th” combination is voiced, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/MUH-th’rz//ˈmʌ.ðɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mother-Ship
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “th” combination is voiced,, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), then the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/MUH-th’r-shih[p]//ˈmʌ.ðɚ.ʃə(ɪ)[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Motion
– For this word, the first “o” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MOH-shihn//ˈmo.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Motivate
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is short, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent, (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MOH-dih-vay[t]//ˈmo.ɾɪ.ve[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Motivated
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the “e” joins with the “-ed” ending, and since the root word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/MOH-dih-vay-dih[d]//ˈmo.ɾɪ.veiː.ɾə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Motivating
– For this word, the “o” is long, the first “t” is a flap-t, the first “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the “e” is dropped to add the “-ing”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MOH-dih-vay-ding//ˈmo.ɾɪ.veiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Motivation
– For this word, the first “o” is long, the first “t” is a flap-t,for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the “e” is dropped to add the “-tion”, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mo-dih-VAY-shihn//mo.ɾɪ.ˈveiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Motor
– For this word, the first “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MOH-d’r//ˈmo.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Motorbike (motor-Bike)
– For this word, the first “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/MOH-d’r-bigh-k//ˈmo.ɾɚ.bʌiː.k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “k” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Motorcycle (motor-Cycle)
– For this word, the first “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the first “c” is soft, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the second “c” is hard, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “c” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent

/MOH-d’r-sigh-k’l//ˈmo.ɾɚ.sʌiː.kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mount
– For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like t”ow” combination, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/mown-[t]//ˈmɑun.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Mountain
– For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the “ai” combination turns into an i-schwa, however, if the “t” is stopped, then the “ai” combination disappears

/MOWN-tihn//ˈmaun.tə(ɪ)/ – Or – /MOWN-‘n//ˈmaun.ʔn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mountains
– For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, the “ai” combination turns into an i-schwa, however, if the “t” is stopped, then the “ai” combination disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/MOWN-[t]ihn-z//ˈmaun.[t]ə(ɪ)n.z/ –Or – /MOWN-‘n-z//ˈmaun.ʔn.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Mouse
– For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/mows//mɑus/

 

Mouth
– For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “th” combination is un-voiced

/mow-th//mɑu.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Move
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the final “e” is silent

/moo-v//mu.v/ – Notice also that the “v” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Moved
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “v” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/moov-[d]//muv.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Movement (Move-ment)
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, the first “e” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MOOV-mihn-[t]//ˈmuv.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Movie
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/MOO-vee//ˈmu.viː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Moving
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MOO-ving//ˈmu.vɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mozart
– For this name, the “o” is long, the “z” is pronounced like a “ts” combination, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/MOHTS-ahr-[t]//ˈmots.ɑɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter M ) –


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