– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter M:  Mu ) –


 

An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Mu

 

Ma . Me . Mi . Mo . Mp . Mr . Ms . My

 

Much
– For this word, the “u” is short

/muh-ch//mʌ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Mud
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/muh-[d]//mʌ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Mugged
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “g” but is (often) stopped (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root word ends with the letter “g” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/muh[g]-d//mʌ[g].d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Mugging
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/muh-ging//mʌ.gɪŋ/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Muggy
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/MUH-gee//ˈmʌ.giː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Multi-
– For this prefix, the “u” is short, and the “i” is long

/MUHL-tai//ˈmʌl.taiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Multi-Lateral
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “i” is long, the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/muhl-tai--d’r-əl//ˌmʌl.taiː.ˈlæ.ɾɚ.əl/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Multi-Media
– For this word, the “u” is short, the first “i” is long, the “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/muhl-tai-MEE-dee-yuh//ˌmʌl.taiː.ˈmiː.ɾiː.jə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Multi-National
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “i” is long, the “a” is short, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/məl-tai--shih-nəl//ˌmʌl.taiː.ˈnæ.ʃə(ɪ).nəl/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Multiple
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/MUHL-tih-pəl//ˈmʌl.tə(ɪ).pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Multiply
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i” (this is not standard pronunciation of the “ly” ending)

/MUHL-tih-plai//ˈmʌl.tə(ɪ).plaiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mum
– For this word, the “u” is short

/muh-m//ˈmʌ.m/ – Notice also that the “m” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Mundane
– For this word, the “u” is a u-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/muhn-DAYN//mʌn.ˈdeiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Municipality
– For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is short, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/myou-nih-sih--lih-dee//ˌmju.nɪ.cɪ.ˈpæ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Mural
– For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MYOO-rəl//ˈmju.ɹəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Murder
– For this word, the “u” disappears, the d is a flap-d, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/M’R-d’r//ˈmɚ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Muscle
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “sc” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s”, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “sc” combination and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” silent

/MUH-səl//ˈmʌ.səl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Muscles
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “sc” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s”, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “sc” combination and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/MUH-səl-z//ˈmʌ.səl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Muscular
– For this word, the first “u” is short, the “c” is hard, the second “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the “a” disappears

/MUHS-kyou-l’r//ˈmʌs.kju.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Museum
– For this word, the first “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “e” is long, and the second “u” is a u-schwa

/myoo-ZEE-uhm//mju.ˈziː.ə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Museums
– For this word, the first “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “e” is long, the second “u” is a u-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/myoo-ZEE-uhm-z//mju.ˈziː.ə(ʌ)m.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Music
– For this word, the first “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MYOO-zih[k]//ˈmju-zə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Musical
– For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MYOO-zih-kəl//ˈmju.zə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Musician
– For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/myoo-ZIH-shin//mju.ˈzɪ.ʃɪn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Musicians/‘s/s’
– For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/myoo-ZIH-shin-z//mju.zɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Muslim
– There are two common pronunciations for this word: 1. The “u” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the “i” turns into an i-schwa. 2. The “u” turns into a true-schwa, and the “i” turns into an i-schwa

/MUHZ-lihm//ˈmʌz.lə(ɪ)m/ – Or – /MOOS-lihm//ˈmus.lə(ɪ)m/ – Notice also that, in both version, the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mussel
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” turns into a true-schwa

/MUH-səl//ˈmʌ.səl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mussels
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/MUH-səl-z//ˈmʌ.səl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Must
– For this word, the “u” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/muh-s[t]//ˈmʌ.s[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Mustang
– For this word, the “u” us short, the “a” is short, and the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MUHS-tæng//ˈmʌs.tæŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Mustard
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “a” disappears, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/MUHS-t’r-[d]//ˈmʌs.tɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the final “d” (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Mutation
– For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” combination sounds like the “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/myooTAY-shihn//mju.ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Mutual
– For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MYOO-choo-əl//ˈmju.tʃu.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter M ) –


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